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Academic, Education & Teaching Web Resources

Following are academic, educational and teaching resources gleaned during Internet reference searches.
No compensation received for these listing, except an occasional link exchange.

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Topical
Index
School Crisis Guide | Cyber-Abuse & Child Protection | Assorted | Career Development | College & University Profiles | Distance Education/Online Courses, Homework & Study Skills Center, Service Learning | Accounting/Business/Economics | Art & Music | Communications/Journalism/Media | Education | English/Grammar: Literacy, Literature/Reading, Storytelling/Folklore, Style Guides, Writing Guides | History: Military History/Wars, U.S. Presidents/Government, Abraham Lincoln | Languages | Leadership Studies/Character & Virtue | Legal Studies/Law/Civil Rights: Copyright/Fair Use/Intellectual Property | Libraries, Museums/On-line Archives | Mathematics | Philosophy/Ethics/Bioethics & Healthcare | Psychology | Reference Section: Dictionaries/Encyclopedias, Speeches/Quotations | Sciences: Anatomy/Physiology, Animals/Mammals/Birds/Bugs, Astronomy/Space, Biology, Botany/Horticulture, Chemistry, Environment/Ecology, Physics | Teaching Resources/Professional Development | Technology/Tutorials

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New icon For your convenience, following are new links: New icon                   updated: 10/27/2014

School Crisis Guide:               Index

Cyber-Abuse and Child Protection:               Index

  • Cyber Safety – An Interactive Guide To Staying Safe On The Internet (InformED). Covers Cyber Bullying, Identity Theft, Plagiarism, Computer Viruses, and General Internet Safety.
  • Cyber Safety: Top 10 Tips for Youth
  • Family Watchdog (National Sex Offender Registry): "Free national US search for registered sex offenders. Map registered sex offenders to see who lives in your area." The mission is to build a bilingual safety portal for awareness of nearby threats by providing accessible and accurate sex offender location information. Contains information from all states, and is updated on a daily basis to ensure that the information is as current as the states from which sex offender data is received.
  • GetNetWise - Families: The Internet offers kids many opportunities for learning, constructive entertainment, and personal growth. At the same time, parents are concerned about the risks kids face online. The challenge for parents is to educate themselves and their children about how to use the Internet safely. Includes: Online Safety Guide | Tools for Families | Web Sites for Kids | Reporting Trouble.
  • Internet Keep Safe Coalition (iKeepSafe): Positive resources for parents, educators and policymakers who teach youths how to use new media devices and platforms in safe and healthy ways.
  • OnGuardOnline.gov: Practical tips from the federal government (FTC, Justice Dept., Homeland Security, IRS, US Postal Inspection Service, Commerce Dept., SEC, FDIC, NCIS) and the technology industry to help you be on guard against Internet fraud, secure your computer, and protect your personal information.
    • Protect Kids Online: Parents can help reduce kids risks of socializing online by talking to them about making safe, responsible decisions.
  • Online Safety Guide: Kids, teens & families. What kinds of risks are there? Risks by technology and privacy information.
  • Online Safety Resources - Yahoo: Making smart choice online. Online safety skills for Teens, and for Parents.
  • Parry Aftab, Esq., The Privacy Lawyer™: Managing cybercrime, privacy and cyber-abuse risks. Check out resource sections on Best Practices, CyberLaw, Internet Safety, Cyberbullying, and more.
  • Safety Tips for Parents (LeanrtheNet.com): Protect children from online exploitation.
  • Stay Safe Online: powered by National Cyber Security Alliance to educate and empower a digital society to use the Internet safely and securely at home, work, and school, protecting the technology individuals use, the networks they connect to, and our shared digital assets.
  • Stop Bullying: created by the U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration. Provides information from various government agencies on what bullying is, what cyberbullying is, who is at risk, and how you can prevent and respond to bullying. Stop Bullying Now!
  • Teach Online Safety (StaySafeOnline.org): Help students & children learn about cybersecurity, cyberethics, and cybersafety with these teaching materials, lesson plans and online safety resources.
  • WiredSafety.org: the world's largest Internet safety and help group. Provides help, information and education to Internet and mobile device users of all ages. Helps victims of cyberabuse ranging from online fraud, cyberstalking and child safety, to hacking and malicious code attacks. Also help for parents with issues, such as MySpace and cyberbullying.

Assorted:               Index

  • The AAA Digest of Motor Laws: online compendium of laws and rules related to driving and owning a motor vehicle in the United States and Canada. Use the map to browse each state’s traffic laws, driver’s license, vehicle titling and registration requirements, and fees and taxes.
  • All Free Christmas Crafts: the best free Christmas crafts, tutorials, tips and DIY Christmas decorations.
  • Busted Halo’s The Freshman Survival Guide: the first to deal with the whole student, treating the intellectual, physical, emotional and spiritual lives of college students as intimately connected aspects of their overall success.
  • Calendar-365: Calendar is very useful when you are looking for a specific date (holiday or vacation for example). Also every week number for every day is displayed for the year with all public/bank holidays and week numbers, a nice moon calendar and a lot more.
  • College Life (CollegeConfidential.com): covers all aspects of the post-decision phase: from travel planning, to packing, to freshman year.
    • Study Skills Information (Cook Counseling Center – Virginia Tech): Check left margin for study skills, tips, and techniques that will promote various aspects of overall learning and study skills, whether your problem is concentration or just needing to reassess your study environment.
  • The Courage To Speak Foundation: Our mission is "to save lives by empowering youth to be drug free through fostering education and open communication about the dangers of drug and alcohol use."
  • Curious: Believe in lifelong learning. Learning for its own sake. Learning that happens beyond classrooms, and not only in academic subjects (unless you count beer brewing, pipe soldering, and organic gardening as academic). Learning as a necessity of living.
  • Family Education: Information for parents on every aspect of family life. Includes resources on child health, child development, nutrition and fitness for the whole family, and child safety.
  • The Higher Education Compliance Alliance: designed to be a continuously updated resource for administrators and others on campus seeking to understand their compliance obligations. The website will aggregate compliance news and resources from participating associations. It will include advice from college and university attorneys and risk managers.
  • sPumpkin Carving 101: Carving history, choosing pumpkins, carving tools and stencils.
  • The Random Acts of Kindness Foundation -  inspires people to practice kindness and to 'pass it on' to others. With all of the pressures of everyday living, too often we forget the difference that simple acts of kindness can make In Your Classroom and In Your Community.
  • Study in the States (Department of Homeland Security): A new DHS website to assist international students interesting in studying in the United States.…It will be a "one-stop shop" for questions about visas, visa renewals and qualification requirements for students looking to come to the United States to study.
  • Textbooks.org: Provides an advanced price comparison search tool that instantly checks textbook prices at 45+ online merchants. Presents the prices plus shipping costs for new, used, ebook, international, and rental textbooks at each of these merchants.
    • Chegg: Students have the option to rent textbooks, as well as buy both new and used textbooks. Chegg also lets you sell textbooks directly to us, and we'll pay top dollar for your books.
    • College Book Renter (CBR): the no-nonsense approach to textbook rental. Renting textbooks has never been easier!
    • Direct Textbook – Find Books Fast, Find Books for Less. Helping students search the best online bookstores for price and availability since 2002.
  • TimeMe: Free web-based timer and stopwatch for your web browser. It can be used to time meetings, class tests or any other events. Due to its huge display it can be easily used in conference rooms with many people or classrooms with students.
  • Tips for Traveling Abroad: U.S. State Dept., Bureau of Consular Affairs. Emergency U.S. Embassies and Consulates contact information, Do’s & Don’ts, travel tips, precautions, customs and import restrictions…
    • MD Travel Health : Complete travel health information for physicians and travelers. Helps travelers look up the country of their choice and offers suggestions on which vaccinations to get, what symptoms to look out for, what precautions to take and what food items to avoid.
  • USA Ultimate: National Governing Body for the sport of Ultimate in the United States. "To advance the sport of Ultimate in the United States by enhancing and promoting Character, Community, and Competition."
  • WatchKnowLearn: Index of over 33,000+ educational videos, placing them into a directory of over 3,000 categories. The videos are available without any registration or fees to teachers in the classroom and to students at home 24/7. Users can dive into our innovative directory or search for videos by subject and age level. Video titles, descriptions, age level information, and ratings are all edited for usefulness.
  • YouTube EDU: devoted to videos of interviews, courses, and lectures from professors at top colleges and universities.

  Career Development:               Index

  • Careers: How-To Guide (Wall Street Journal). Includes Your Career in a Tough Economy | How to Start a Job Search | How to Succeed in a Job Interview | Managing Your Career | How to Overcome Career Obstacles | How to Identify Job Opportunities | How to Search for a Job | How to Work With Executive Recruiters.

College & University Profiles:               Index

  • American School Search: dedicated to helping you find the right school or university that matches your needs and provides you with the skills you need to start a new and rewarding career.
  • BrainTrack: profiles almost every US higher-education institution with original overviews, home page links, detailed degree data, similar schools, and more. Includes guides for finding schools, such as by religion, and articles on topics such as financial aid, accreditation, transfers, and international studies in the US. All of our listed US colleges and universities are recognized by the US Department of Education as being accredited.
  • Catholic Colleges and Universities in the United States (USCCB): Degree-granting institutions of Catholic higher education in the United States.
  • CollegeAtlas - A World of Higher Learning: Helping aspiring students and education minded professionals make an informed decision about which college to attend or which degree program to pursue by providing them with relevant, reliable and up-to-date information about college and higher education opportunities.
  • CollegeView  Lets you research over 3000 colleges to find the perfect fit. There’s even a help course for pointers on preparing those dreaded admission essays. You can search for scholarships, download the admissions applications and in general find all pertinent information without having to individually correspond with every institution in which you might be interested. This site is not just for high schoolers; it also has career counseling for those of us who do not know what we want to be when we grow up.
  • MatchCollege: Over 6,000 colleges and universities listed, providing information on housing, financial aid, tuition, admissions, athletics, current events and more…Schools can be filtered by state, city and type of degrees offered.
Distance Education, Online Courses:               Index
  • Accredited Online Colleges: Complete Directory of Top Accredited Online Schools, Online Colleges and Online Universities. A searchable directory of online colleges and universities to let you find the online accredited colleges that fit your own educational needs.
  • The GED Academy: GED practice tests with hundreds of actual GED practice test questions in all five subject areas - math, science, reading, social studies, and test writing including the essay.
  • MIT OpenCourseWare: free publication of MIT course materials that reflects almost all the undergraduate and graduate subjects taught at MIT. OCW is open and available to the world and is a permanent MIT activity.
    • Tufts University OpenCourseWare: Includes a wide range of materials, including lecture notes, syllabi, extensive bibliographies, and various media presentations. Visitors can click on the "Courses" heading, which will return a complete list of all the currently available course materials. Ranging from an introductory course on agricultural science and policy to a "physics for humanists" course, there are a number of real finds here.
  • Parliament Tutors: free online test preparation tools for all students (no registration required!). Check out the Full-length Diagnostic Exam to assess your skills.
Homework & Study Skills Center:               Index
  • Academic Earth: free access to video courses and academic lectures from leading colleges and universities. Subjects: AP Test Prep | Architecture | Astronomy | Biology | Chemistry | Computer Science | Economics | Engineering | Entrepreneurship | Environmental Studies | History | International Relations | Law | Literature | Mathematics | Media Studies | Medicine | Philosophy | Physics | Political Science | Pre-Med | Psychology | Religious Studies.
  • CosmoLearning (CL): an educational website committed to improve the quality of homeschooling, teaching and student excellence, helping educators and self-learners alike anywhere in the world. Provides video lectures, courses, documentaries, books, quizzes, lecture notes and much more.
  • Fact Monster: reference site for kids that provides a dictionary, encyclopedia, almanac as well as homework help and a variety of daily features, including This Day in History, Today's Birthday, and educational games – Fact Monster is indeed a monster site!
  • Fora.tv: A collection of free video lectures & talks from some of the world's most influential thinkers.
  • Free Test Online - Standardized Tests Math and Science Practice for SAT, ACT, CLEP, Advanced Placement and GMAT standardized tests. Designed for students who are looking for free test practice and help and teachers who are searching for teaching resources.
  • FreeVideoLectures: Bringing Free Education to All: "to organize the world's educational videos and make them universally accessible and down-loadable". Offers 90 + free online video courses from leading universities. All courses are categorized by Subjects and Universities. Subjects range from the usual Anatomy, Economics, and History.
  • Homework Center (Fact Monster from Information Please). Homework Help on English, math, history, geography, science, and social studies.
    • Homework Helper (refdesk.com): Covers Grades 1-12, College, Tools for Research Papers, etc.
    • HomeworkNYC.org developed by The New York Public Library, the Brooklyn Public Library and the Queens Public Library in coordination with the New York City Department of Education as part of the "Learning in Libraries" initiative, supported by The Wallace Foundation. The site will assist students throughout New York City with their homework, research and studies." Learning in Libraries" focuses on changing the way libraries serve youth outside of the classroom.
    • HomeworkSpot.com: K-12 homework-related resources for English, math, science, history, art, music, technology, foreign language, college prep, health, life skills, extracurricular activities and much more. Also features a powerful reference center that provides free, immediate access to many of the world's best libraries, museums, and current event sources.
    • Infoplease Homework Center: "Largest free reference site. Encyclopedia, Dictionary, Almanacs, and Homework Help on English, math, history, geography, science, and social studies."
  • Learning Treasures - Homeschooling Resources: free worksheets for Language Arts, History, Geography, Science, Math, and preschool/homeschooling curriculum.
  • National Geographic for Kids: Homework Help: Research information on Animals, History/Culture, Geography/Maps, Photos/Art, Science/Nature.
  • Scholastic.com: 'Where Children Love to Learn and Learn to Grow.' This site has a wealth of information organized into sections, including one for Families that has 'everything you need to know to encourage a love of learning,' one for Kids where the younger set can find lots of online fun and experience their favorite characters coming to life, and a section for Teachers chock full of classroom tools and other resources. Continually updated with weekly articles and new activities.
  • Study Skills Tip Sheets and Advice: Created by Emory University's College of Arts and Sciences to help students accomplish their goals. On the site, visitors will find nine different documents, including "Science and Math Tips for Success", "Note-taking", and "Essential Tips for Freshmen (and other students too)".
Service Learning:               Index
  • The National Service-Learning Clearinghouse (NSLC): supporting the service-learning efforts of schools, higher education institutions, communities, and tribal nations. Offers timely information and relevant resources, thousands of free online resources, the nation's largest library of service-learning materials, national service-learning listservs, and reference and technical assistance services.
  • United We Serve: promoting and fostering volunteering and national service in America.
    • Volunteer.gov.: America's natural and cultural resources volunteer portal which lists volunteer opportunities on public lands in the United States.
Accounting, Business and Economics:               Index

  • Accounting Coach: Online Free Accounting Course to Help You Become Financially Literate: Discover accounting with the world's largest free online accounting course. Learn accounting principles, debits/credits, financial ratios, payroll accounting, and more.
  • Accounting Made Simple: helping students, small business owners, and others interested in learning, refreshing and applying accounting knowledge. Aspects ranging from principles of financial and managerial accounting to practical advice are covered in lectures, tutorials, articles.
  • American Fact Finder (US Census Bureau): Your source for population, housing, economic, and geographic data.
  • Basics of Building Credit: The goal of the lesson plans are to educate children between the ages of 6-18 about the different aspects of building credit and credit card ownership. Scroll down for the free lesson plans by school grades.
  • Bankers' Almanac Banking Dictionary: a glossary of key banking words/phrases and terms.
  • Better Money Habits (Khan Academy & Bank of America Partnership): New way to learn the "why" and the "how" behind personal finance to help you put that knowledge into practice more effectively than ever before.
  • Business Dictionary: over 20,000 definitions and over 115,000 links between related terms providing a clear and concise description of any and all business terms.
  • BusinessUSA.gov: The cross-agency web site managed by the U.S. Small Business Administration. Includes Small Business Guides, Gov’t Forms, State & Local Info and Resources. Also, a new search feature to help business owners and prospective business owners find government financial assistance for their enterprises.
  • Business Plans and Profiles Index (Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh): A subject guide to sample business plans and profiles for specific business types. This index lists types of small businesses and a corresponding sample business plan, profile or book about the business with sources provided after each entry.
  • Business Reference Services (LOC): All major business subjects are covered, including industry information, commerce, statistics, banking, insurance, economics, finance, investment, marketing, and more.
  • Business Writer’s Free Library Writing letters or memos in the world of business is an acquired skill, and those beginning to learn about this process will appreciate this site, which was designed by the Authenticity Counseling Company. The helpful resources offered here are divided into several sections, including "General Resources and Advice", "Basic Writing Skills", and "Basic Composition Skills". One other section is worth noting as well, and this is the section titled "Some Types of Correspondence". This is perhaps the section most relevant to business writing practices, as it includes sample memos, meeting minutes, and procedures for composing effective business emails.
  • CasePlace.org: an online library of curated reading materials, multimedia content, and teaching modules that focuses on social, environmental and ethical issues in business.
  • The Catholic Labor Network: Catholic Church's teachings on labor issues, & economic justice. Excellent selection of Catholic Social Teachings.
  • Catholic Teaching on Economic Life: (USCCB). Statements on economic life from U.S. bishops, Pope Benedict XVI & the Holy See.
  • Consumer Price Index deflator: areppim’s Mathematics & Financial Calculators. The real value of US dollars after deflating with the Consumer Price Index (CPI), 1913-2013. "This CPI-based deflator is used to calculate real dollar values when dealing with private consumption. If your interest extends to private investment, exports, imports or government consumption, expenditure and investment, please use  areppim’s GDP deflator-based calculator."
  • Dave Marshall’s Bean Counter: features free tutorials on basic business accounting and bookkeeping.
    • My Accounting Course: free online accounting course that provides financial accounting examples and problems for students and professionals…"over 400 articles discussing different accounting topics."
  • Econ in the Classroom - The Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago: a wide range of educational resources designed for economics and finance educators. Visitors should take a look at the Making Learning Economics Fun student workbook and teacher's guide.
  • Economic and Personal Finance Resources - Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City. For educators, bankers and consumers of all ages to understand how the economy functions and know what tools are available make better financial decisions.
  • The Economic Research Service (USDA): a primary source of economic information and research programs to inform public and private decision-making on economic and policy issues involving food, farming, natural resources, and rural development.
  • Economics U$A - 21st Century Edition (Annenberg Learner). This primer on micro- and macroeconomics includes 28 30-minute programs. These materials cover topics such as Supply and Demand, Economic Efficiency, and Profits and Interest. Educators will be glad to learn that the complete program website includes discussion questions, worksheets, and additional activities for the classroom.
  • ExecutivePlanet guide to international business culture, customs, and etiquette, which covers many aspects of doing business worldwide. Dress is covered as is entertaining appropriately and even acceptable public behavior.
  • Financial Education in the Math Classroom (Math Forum at Drexel University): Focuses solely on teaching financial education in the math classroom. Topics include Credit & Debt, Credit Costs, Interest Rates, Mortgages, Financial Planning & Money Management, Banking, Comparison Shopping/Buying Goods and Services, Spending.
  • GameTheory.net -  provides resource materials to educators and students of game theory, including the application of game theory to economics, business, political science, computer science, and other disciplines.
  • Guide to American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) Compliance: Agencies and companies hoping to benefit from the half-trillion dollars in economic stimulus spending need to understand the scope and seriousness of ARRA reporting requirements aimed at preventing fraud, waste and abuse. Investing time, effort and resources today to establish and improve compliance processes and controls can help organizations mitigate potentially catastrophic problems later. Explore the resources to learn more.
  • IRS Exempt Organizations Select Check. The IRS has launched a new tool to find more information about tax-exempt organizations. "In addition, organizations that have automatically lost their tax exemptions may now be searched by EIN, name, city, state, ZIP Code, country, exemption type, and revocation posting date, rather than only by state."
  • Investopedia: With a nice collection of free tutorials that can take you from the most basic skills to advanced information, this site can be considered one of the best beginner’s resource online to learn to invest money. There are even real exercises and mock tests to help you if you are taking CFA professional exams.
  • Learn Marketing: offers a variety of resources designed to provide education in the field of marketing - including PowerPoints, clipart, lectures, quizzes, glossaries and more. It includes information on marketing mix, research and segmentation. Marketing information is directed both at domestic and international fields.
  • The Levy Economics Institute of Bard College: to "serve the wider policymaking community in the United States and the rest of the world by enabling scholars and leaders in business, labor, and government to work together on problems of common interest."
  • Living Wage Calculator: Helps estimate the cost of living in your community or region. It's an interesting policy tool and it can be used to teach students about economics, the job market, and much more.
  • MyMoney.gov (U.S. Financial Literacy and Education Commission): dedicated to teaching all Americans the basics about financial education. Whether you are planning to buy a home, balancing your checkbook, or investing in your 401k, the resources on MyMoney.gov can help you do it better.
    • MyMoney.gov – Resources for Teachers and Educators: Provides information about and links to a collection of federal guides and curricula for teaching financial capability concepts.…including those who work with children as well as practitioners who teach adults.
  • Practical Money Skills for Life: Financial Literacy for Everyone: an online resource for educators, parents and students focused on financial literacy and education.
  • Resources for Economists on the Internet (American Economic Association): a categorized list of resources relevant to economists.
  • Retirement Planning Resources (Annuity FYI): Includes Retirement Planning, Social Security, Railroad Retirement, Individual Retirement Accounts (IRAs), Rollovers, Early Withdrawals, IRS Guidance, State Taxation, Pensions, Annuities & Life Insurance, Medicare and Medicaid, Long Term Care, and more.
  • Small Business Learning Center: Free Online Courses. Programs and services to help you start, grow and succeed. Most of the courses take approximately 30 minutes to complete, and they include such offerings as "Starting Your Small Business," "Developing a Successful Business Plan," and "Building Your Brand."
  • Smart About Money (National Endowment for Financial Education): a non-profit that aims to educate and prepare Americans to successfully face financial challenges throughout all stages of life. Check out an excellent "Resource Library" link that contains articles, online courses, curriculum, and tools from NEFE and other unbiased sources…choose from almost two dozen topics, including "Home Ownership", "Bankruptcy", "Investing", "Hiring a Financial Planner", and "Buying a Car".
  • Statlect - Digital Textbook on Probability, Statistics: Includes: Fundamentals of probability theory, Probability distributions, Fundamentals of statistics, Glossary of probability and statistics terms.
  • StartupNation If you are looking for expert advice on all aspects of starting and growing a business, and want to learn in an entertaining way, you've come to the right place - StartupNation®. If so, you are joining a robust community of entrepreneurs and small business owners who are also "living the dream" everyday.
  • The Ultimate Business Ethics Resource (Lead411.cm): Includes Ethics of Finance | Human Resource Management | Sales & Marketing | Production | Property & Intellectual Property Rights |Technology | International Business.
  • U.S. Federal Reserve – History Web Gateway: "…offers students, educators, researchers, and others information about the founding of the Fed and its purpose, more than 230 biographies of key individuals, essays on major events in the Fed’s history, and access to various Fed archives."
  • United States Money - A Guide to Information Sources (LOC): Resources on the history of money in the United States from colonial times to the present. Although the focus is on the United States, we have included a few selected resources that also briefly cover the early history of money elsewhere in the world.
  • U.S. Treasury - Office of Financial Education: Educational resources developed by organizations within the U.S. Treasury and designed for teachers, including the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, and others. The materials here include "Money Smart", which is a curriculum designed to help adults understand basic financial services and "Building Wealth", which presents an overview of such important strategies as creating a household budget and managing debt.
  • YouAreHere (Federal Trade Commission): a "virtual mall" that will help students in 5th-8th grade learn to protect their privacy, spot frauds and scams, and avoid identity theft. The FTC Web site introduces key consumer and business concepts and helps youngsters understand their role in the marketplace.
    • Parents and Teachers: For your convenience, we have provided a brief description of each store in the mall. We’ve also provided fact sheets, lesson plans and classroom activities that complement the site. The site can be used to support lessons in critical thinking, language arts, writing, media literacy, business, civics, and social studies.

Art and Music:               Index

  • Art & Music - Lesson Corner: lesson plans and worksheets
  • Color Theory Tutorial Color theory has been worked on by a number of individuals over the years, and those with an interest in the field include artists, scientists, and of course, interior designers. Visitors can learn about the basics of color, complementary colors, and concepts such as contrast, dominance, proportion, and intensity.
  • Guitar Chords 365: Learn to play the guitar. All the Guitar Chords are organized by family and in Alphabetic Order so that you can find the Chord you are looking for easily! These are the most popular guitar chords that most beginners start with. Click on the family and then the name of the guitar chord to see to play the chord!
  • Google Cultural Institute: Discover exhibits and collections from museums and archives all around the world. Explore cultural treasures in extraordinary detail, from hidden gems to masterpieces.
    • LIFE Photo Archive: Search millions of photographs from the LIFE photo archive, stretching from the 1750s to today. Most were never published and are now available for the first time through the joint work of LIFE and Google.
    • The Metropolitan Museum of Art (MOMA): over 400,000 images available for free download for non-commercial use as a part of its Open Access for Scholarly Content initiative.
  • The Performing Arts Encyclopedia (PAE): Library of Congress: The PAE provides information about the Library's unsurpassed collections of scores, sheet music, audio recordings, films, photographs, and other materials.
  • Stradivari Quartet 1963-1996 recordings now available online in Iowa Digital Library (The University of Iowa Libraries). Forty-four years after its first public performance, the Stradivari String Quartet now has audio recordings from 1963-1996 publicly available in the Iowa Digital Library.
Communications, Journalism and Media:               Index

  • AllYouCanRead: the largest database of magazines and newspapers on the Internet, with listings for about 25,000 magazines, newspapers and top news sites from all over the world.
  • American Cinema (Annenberg Media group): Teaching creative thinking through American film. Produced by the New York Center for Visual History along with KCET/Los Angeles and the BBC, this thirteen-part series contains 10 one-hour and 3 half-hour video programs. Visitors will need to register to watch the programs, but after doing so they can watch all of them in their entirety, and they may also view special extras, like the classroom exercise "Writing a Scene."
    • Reel Classics: dedicated exclusively to Classic Movies and the stars. You'll find pictures and information on movies and musicals as well as biographies and pictures of the actors and actresses. Not to be left out, the Movie Makers section features the directors, producers, costume designers, choreographers and other support artists and, of course, the studios.
    • Black and White Movies: Mostly public domain films with expired copyright. A large collection of classic old movies from the 1920’s up to the 1970’s. Movies are categorized into different genres such as Action, Adventure, Comedy, Drama, Horror, War, and more.
    • Movieguide - The Family Guide to Movie Reviews: "Movie reviews from a Christian perspective. The Christian family guide to movies and entertainment."
  • The Art of the Commencement Speech, an Archive: Index of Outstanding Speeches from 1936 onward.
  • Business Journalism Created by the Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism at Arizona State University. Include instructional materials, including tutorials on how to cover financial markets and understanding financial markets.
  • Butterick's Practical Typography: offers sage and thoughtful advice about how typography can be used to enhance and illuminate good prose. Look over the "Typography in Ten Minutes" area to get a sense of some bedrock principles introduced in the work. For those with more time, the complete work is also available here, along with a Summary of Key Rules and the all-important Why Typography Matters area.
  • The Center for Social Media Impact (American University's School of Communication): We investigate, showcase and set standards for socially engaged media-making. We organize conferences, publish research, create codes of best practices, and incubate media strategies.
    • Code of Best Practices in Fair Use: Center for Social Media (American University's School of Communication)
    • Code of Best Practices in Fair Use for Online Video: This document is a code of best practices that helps creators, online providers, copyright holders, and others interested in the making of online video interpret the copyright doctrine of fair use. Fair use is the right to use copyrighted material without permission or payment under some circumstances.
  • Columbia Journalism Review: to encourage excellence in journalism in the service of a free society.
  • Communications Skill Articles - Impact Communications, Inc. If you move your mouse over the button titled "Articles" you will see a drop down menu – the left column of articles is about Presentation Communication Skills and the articles in right column are about Telephone Communication Skills. Click on any year and you will see the articles written in that year.
  • CyberJournalist.net: "premier news and resource site about how the digital technology is transforming the media."…"Offers tips, news and commentary about the future of media, social media, mobile trends, innovation in media, online journalism and digital storytelling."
  • Editor & Publisher: America's Oldest Journal Covering the Newspaper Industry
  • The Film Literature Index (FLI) annually indexes 150 film and television periodicals from 30 countries cover-to-cover and 200 other periodicals selectively for articles on film and television. The periodicals range from the scholarly to the popular. More than 2,000 subject headings provide detailed analysis of the articles.
  • Folkstreams: To say that finding certain obscure documentaries can be difficult is quite an understatement. Fortunately, finding documentary films about American folk or roots culture just got much easier, courtesy of the good people at Folkstreams.net. On this website, visitors can view dozens of very compelling documentaries.
  • "How The Pros Do It: Avoiding Embarrassment & Delivering Perfect Presentations" (MakeUseof.com). Public speaking and presentations is an art. So what makes the perfect presentation? Well, there isn't just one thing that you must do, but a collaboration of things.
  • kdmcBerkeley (The Knight Digital Media Center at UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism) offers multimedia workshops to career journalists, communication professionals and higher education. Our hands-on training in digital media includes workshops in data visualization, multimedia content production to the web, and social media with a focus on storytelling, technology and innovation – Tutorials and Video Presentations.
  • Media College educational resource for all forms of electronic media. Topics include video & television production, audio work, photography, graphics, web design and more. There are a number of free downloads, including a "Talent Release Form" and "US Copyright Application Form PA," under Downloads > Forms in the link at the top of the page.
  • Media Education - A Kit for Teachers, Students, Parents and Professionals. It proposes a prototype of media education curriculum for the basic qualification of secondary school teachers, but it also extends to adults outside the school system, be they parent, media professional or decision-maker. In addition to a teachers’ manual and accompanying students’ handbook, the kit also contains a manual for parents as well as a handbook on ethical relations with professionals and one on internet literacy.
  • News Writing (Annenberg Media): A video instructional series on writing and reporting for college and high school classrooms and adult learners; 15 half-hour video programs and coordinated books.
  • Nido Qubein Resource Center: Free Articles on "How to be an Effective Communicator," and more.
  • Pew Center for Civic Journalism
  • Poynter Online: Everything you need to know to be a better journalist.
  • Project for Excellence in Journalism - Ethics Codes: For those teaching journalism students, this selection of ethics codes from a range of news organizations will be indispensable. Brought together by the Pew Research Center's Project for Excellence in Journalism, this page contains ethics guidelines and codes from fifteen different news organizations from around the globe.
  • Reporter's Guide to Multimedia Proficiency: Guidance for journalists who are ready to learn how to transform themselves into multimedia journalists. This series should demystify many of the new options for storytelling that have been made possible by digital tools.
  • Reuters: Handbook of Journalism. This handbook is not intended as a collection of "rules". Beyond the obvious, such as the cardinal sin of plagiarism, the dishonesty of fabrication or the immorality of bribe-taking, journalism is a profession that has to be governed by ethical guiding principles rather than by rigid rules.
  • "Teaching the Ethics of Communications in a Catholic University": Msgr. Paul Tighe, at Minuto de Dios University, Columbia, Oct. 8, 2009.
  • 'Today's Front Pages: Newseum: an online presentation with more than 800 newspapers worldwide. "The Newseum features seven levels of galleries, theaters, retail spaces and visitor services. It offers a unique environment that takes museum-goers behind the scenes to experience how and why news is made."
  • TV News Archive Search the closed captioning text of over 350,000 TV news broadcasts since 2009. CNN, Fox New’s and MSNBC’s broadcast schedule in its entirety is backed up here, as is every major network’s nightly news programs and news magazines. Even The Daily Show and The Colbert Report are completely searchable on this single site – just type a term and if it shows up in the closed captioning records, you’ll see a video, instantly.
  • Vimeo Video School: Online Learning Resource For Beginner Filmmakers. Learn how to make better videos with lessons and tutorials.

Education:               Index

  • Early Childhood Education: Effective teaching practices in center-based settings with 3- to 5-year-old children who are not yet in kindergarten: teaching phonological awareness and using interactive and dialogic reading. Find tools and templates you can use (Department of Education).
  • The Education Directory for Children With Special Needs: provides military families (and non-military families) with children with special needs the information they need to make informed assignment decisions and easier transitions.
  • Education Nation: NBC News' initiative to engage the country in a solutions-focused conversation about the state of education in America.
  • EDSITEment (The National Endowment for the Humanities): The Best of the Humanities on the Web.
    • Lesson Plans: Explore the library of humanities lesson plans by subject, theme, and grade level. Find Art & Culture lessons on anthropology, art history, folklore, mythology, religion, and more Foreign Language lessons on languages and the cultures of which they are a part; History & Social Studies lessons on American (including our popular AP U.S. History index) and World History, civics, government and society; and Literature & Language Arts lessons on great writing and great literary works throughout the ages.
    • Student Resources: interactive activities that can be used to support related lesson plans or as standalone activities in the classroom. Browse the library of student resources by grade level or subject area below.
  • Scholastic for Teachers – Where Teachers Come First: Includes resources & tools, strategies & ideas, student activities, books & authors.
  • Stop Bullying: created by the U.S. Health and Human Services (HHS). Provides information from various government agencies on what bullying is, what cyberbullying is, who is at risk, and how you can prevent and respond to bullying. Stop Bullying Now!
  • SweetSearch: search engine designed for students. Every Web site in SweetSearch has been evaluated by research experts.
    • SweetSites collections - Dulcinea Media: Search engines designed for students, librarians and teachers, organized by subject and academic level.
  • Teach With Movies: the premiere site on the Internet showing teachers how to create lesson plans using movies and film - TeachWithMovies is now Free for everyone. In addition, teachers in public and non-profit schools may copy TWM curriculum materials for use in their classrooms. Parents may copy TWM curriculum materials for use in educating their children.
  • Teaching Resource Center – University of Virginia: Dedicated to "committed conversation about teaching at all levels and in all academic disciplines."
English and Grammar:               Index

  • Business Writer’s Free Library: The helpful resources offered here are divided into several sections, including "General Resources and Advice", "Basic Writing Skills", and "Basic Composition Skills". One other section is worth noting as well, and this is the section titled "Some Types of Correspondence". Includes sample memos, meeting minutes, and procedures for composing effective business emails.
  • "Common Errors in English Usage" by Paul Brians (Emeritus Professor of English Washington State University): This is not a site dealing with grammar in general. Here we’re concerned only with deviations from the standard use of English as judged by sophisticated users such as professional writers, editors, teachers, and literate executives and personnel officers.
  • Commonly Confused Words: Language reference content from Oxford Dictionaries.
  • English-Daily: Free resources for learning English online - free exercises, idioms, common abbreviations, slang, proverbs and much more.
  • English Verb Conjugation: Conjugation is the regular arrangement of the forms of the verb in the various voices…conjugates 15,000 verbs in the affirmative, interrogative, and negative forms, with all tenses and persons. There are popular conjugated verbs on the front page, too (along with some verbs generally regarded as rude - watch your filters.)
  • English & Writing: LessonCorner.com: lesson plans and worksheets
  • ESL Tools & Resources (UsingEnglish.com) a large collection of English as a Second Language (ESL) tools & resources for students, teachers, learners and academics. Browse our grammar glossary and references of irregular verbs, phrasal verbs and idioms, ESL forums, articles, teacher handouts and printables, and find useful links and information on English.
    • English Language Reference includes definitions of English grammar terms, irregular verbs, phrasal verbs and idioms. Also includes links to online dictionaries.
    • Nonstopenglish.com: a FREE English as a Second language (ESL) and English as a Foreign Language (EFL) activity website. You can practice English language with our online interactive exercises.
  • ESL at Frankfurt International School: For learners of English as a second language.
  • Grammar Book (The Blue Book of Grammar and Punctuation). #1 Source for Grammar and Punctuation Answers. Learn all about who and whom, affect and effect, subjects and verbs, adjectives and adverbs, commas, semicolons, quotation marks, and much more.
    • Grammar Check - Free Online Grammar Checker: Even in these days of text-speak, thoughts dashed off in 120 characters and casual blogging, grammar and spelling still count. Many times it is the ideas expressed in articles and blog posts that are important, but poor grammar can mean poor communication.
    • Best Free Grammar Resources (MakeUseOf.com): Great free grammar guides that can help you brush up on your grammar rules.
    • Grammar & Usage - Oxford Dictionaries: Critical ingredients to good writing are spelling, grammar, and correct use of words. Covers CVs and Job Applications, Commonly Misspelled Words, Grammar and Spelling Tips, Letter Writing.
    • The Grammarist: English language resource that covers a broad spectrum of grammar topics including typical English mistakes and proper usage, tricky and easily confused words and phrases, archaisms, spelling, parts of speech and style. Scroll to bottom of page for more grammar resources.
    • Guide to Grammar and Style (Jack Lynch): Last revised 9 January 2008. Plagiarism | What-Why-How to Cite.
    • Plagiarism (The Writing Center, UNC-Chapel Hill): This handout explains what plagiarism is and outlines steps students can follow to avoid plagiarizing.
    • Plagtracker.com Plagiarism checking tool – the most accurate and absolutely FREE!
    • Preventing and Handling Plagiarism (InformEd): "Basically, plagiarism is taking someone else’s ideas or products and pretending that you came up with them yourself either by directly lying or through neglecting to cite the source.…Plagiarism is illegal."
  • Howjsay.com: A free online Talking Dictionary of English Pronunciation. There are currently 164204 entries in the dictionary.
  • How to Improve English - Free Resources (EnglishLeap.com): Contains tips on improving English, help with English grammar, punctuation rules, common mistakes non-native English speakers usually make, English exercises to test your language skills.
    • Spoken English Blog: Provides animated diagrams, links, games, and advice to help students improve their spoken English. Created by an English teacher working in Vietnam and so made the site in response to common problems students face, particularly with pronunciation.
  • How To Write A Great Lede When Writing For The Web
  • Idiom Site: An idiom is 'a manner of speaking that is natural to native speakers of a particular language.' You'll find an alphabetic list of origins of the most common sayings, sayings like 'absence makes the heart grow fonder,' 'go the extra mile'. This is a great resource for speeches as well as common knowledge, trivia and such.
    • Cambridge International Dictionary of Idioms (TheFreeDictionary.com): Explains over 7,000 idioms current in British, American and Australian English, helping learners to understand them and use them with confidence.…Full-sentence examples show how idioms are really used.
    • Eponyms, List of (Wikipedia): An eponym is a person (real or fictitious) from whom something is said to take its name. The word is back-formed from "eponymous", from the Greek "eponymos" meaning "giving name."
    • Oxymorons.info: "An Oxymoron is a combination of contradictory or incongruous words, such as 'Cruel Kindness' or 'Jumbo Shrimp' (Jumbo means 'large' while Shrimp means 'small'). It is a literary figure of speech in which opposite or contradictory words, terms, phrases or ideas are combined to create a rhetorical effect by paradoxical means."
  • Learning English - BBC: Offers help in the form of "Words in the News", "Quizzes", videos via YouTube, and English "makeovers" in "General and Business English". "Words in the News", "The Teacher", and "Keep Your English Up to Date" help learners with their "Grammar, Vocabulary and Pronunciation".
  • One Stop English - Resources for Teaching English: With over 6,500 resources, including lesson plans, worksheets, audio, video and flashcards, One Stop English is the world’s number one resource site for English language teachers.
  • Spell It!—the Scripps National Spelling Bee study site created in cooperation with Merriam-Webster. The site focuses on the official list of about 1150 words, divided into sections by language of origin. Note the "Word From" section in left column.
  • Synonym-Finder: Dictionary of Synonyms Online. Speak and write with confidence. To help you avoid using the same word too repetitively, redundantly, recurrently, incessantly, etc.… Note links at top of page to search for Antonyms and Definitions.
  • VocabTest - the place for SAT Vocabulary Tests: Series of English tests for all levels divided by grade, from Middle School to AP Senior. Select a level and take a test. It will tell you whether you are right or wrong and in the end, provide you with an explanation of the words and your average score compared to other students.
    • Major Tests a large collection of prep tests for the SAT, GRE, GMAT covering math, verbal critical reading, and writing. As well, there is a word list with over 1500 essential words to build your vocabulary.
    • SAT Vocabulary Essential Words: An essential core vocabulary of 1000 words to help you nail your SAT exam. Check out how well you remember these essential words.
    • Varsity Tutors Practice Tests: a comprehensive suite of completely free practice tests, flashcards, and questions of the day for standardized tests and academic subjects of all levels – ACT, AP, CLEP, GED, GMAT, LSAT, MCAT, SAT and other levels.
    • Vocabulary Spelling City: free spelling tool that makes teaching spelling exciting. With online spelling games, spelling reviews, and spelling quizzes, your students will learn those weekly spelling words with unprecedented enthusiasm.
  • Web English Teacher: Educators can take advantage of online technology to share ideas and to benefit from the work of others. Beginning teachers can find guidance; experienced teachers can find inspiration. Think of it as the faculty library and faculty workroom on a global scale.
  • Word Buff: Word Lists, Vocabulary & Spelling Tips; Memory Techniques & Word Game Strategies.

       Literacy:               Index

  • Center for the Book (Library of Congress): presents a sampling of suggested books that will spark imagination and transport readers to new and exciting places.
  • Free Reading: an "open source" instructional program that helps teachers teach early reading. Because it's open source, it represents the collective wisdom of a wide community of teachers and researchers. It's designed to contain a scope and sequence of activities that can support and supplement a typical "core" or "basal" program.
  • Improving Adolescent Literacy: Effective Classroom and Intervention Practices (Institute of Education Science-U.S. Department of Education). This guide presents strategies that classroom teachers and specialists can use to increase the reading ability of adolescent students. The recommendations aim to help students gain more from their reading tasks, improve their motivation for and engagement in the learning process, and assist struggling readers who may need intensive and individualized attention.
  • International Reading Association: Web Resources for the Literacy Community
    • ReadWriteThink: Classroom Resources - lessons, interactives, calendar activities, and more.

       Literature and Reading:                Index

  • "Acres of Diamonds" by Russell Conwell. Not only one of the greatest models of effective speech ever delivered, but it also contains the philosophy of a lifetime.
  • Aesop's Fables: free PDF download
  • BookHive: Your Guide to Children's Literature and Books. Developed by the library of Charlotte and Mecklenberg County, North Carolina, for the purpose of categorizing and suggesting children's books. If you're looking for a particular subject, the 'Find A Book' section has the reviews grouped into various categories such as Adventure, Classics all the way through Scary literature.
  • Books and Authors in Your Classroom (Scholastic.com)
  • Bookshare: Accessible books and periodicals for readers with print disabilities: Free for all U.S. students with qualifying disabilities. Student memberships are currently funded by an award from the U.S. Department of Education Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP).
  • The Cambridge History of English and American Literature: An Encyclopedia in 18 volumes. Considered the most important work of literary history and criticism ever published, the Cambridge History contains over 303 chapters and 11,000 pages, with essay topics ranging from poetry, fiction, drama and essays to history, theology and political writing. The set encompasses a wide selection of writing on orators, humorists, poets, newspaper columnists, religious leaders, economists, Native Americans, song writers, and even non-English writing, such as Yiddish and Creole.
  • The Center for the Book (Library of Congress): to promote reading, literacy and libraries. The website offers a great many "Resources" on the menu on the left side of any page. "Educators and Parents" section visitors can find wonderful lesson plans, exhibitions, and online activities.
  • Chesterton, G.K. books: free and available as PDFs, in English and Spanish. These books are available by the G.K. Chesterton Institute for Faith & Culture.
  • Children’s Books: About.com’s Children’s Books Expert, has sifted through the wide world of children’s literature to bring you an ever-changing series of recommendations, reviews, links, activities, and blog posts.
  • Classic Reader: Read Free Classic Books Online. Where you can read, search, and annotate great works of literature by authors such as Dickens, Tolstoy, Shakespeare, and many others. The collection 'currently contains 3463 works of literature (including 1998 short stories) by 342 authors.' Access to the content is available by author, by title, by category, e.g. fiction, children's literature, short stories, poetry, etc.
  • Dickens, Charles Page: dedicated to bringing the genius of Dickens to a new generation of readers. Dickens was 19th century London personified, he survived its mean streets as a child and, largely self-educated, possessed the genius to become the greatest writer of his age.
  • Family Friend Poems: showcases some of the best poems written by ordinary people about the subjects of family and friends. The life circumstances, relationships, and emotions which they write about express feelings which we all can share, including poems on death and grieving.
  • "The Golden Legend (Aurea Legenda)": Medieval Sourcebook. "The Golden Legend" by Jacobus de Voragine, writing about 1260, achieved dominance in later western hagiographical literature – about 900 manuscripts of his Golden Legend survive. From 1470 to 1530 it was also the most often printed book in Europe.…the Medieval Sourcebook makes available the full text of the seven volume edition published by Temple Classics in 1900. That was based on an older English translation by William Caxton, but with a text modernized by F.S. Ellis. Any notes in [square brackets] were added for this e-text.
  • GradeSaver: Staffed by Harvard-educated editors and researchers, the site offers services ranging from essay-writing tips to professional editing of your grammatically-challenged work.
    • ClassicNotes - Study Guides and Literature Essays: offered for free by GradeSaver on novels, plays, poems and films…Each study guide includes essays, an in-depth chapter-by-chapter summary and analysis, character list, theme list, historical context, author biography and quiz. Study guides are available in PDF format.
    • Jiffynotes: FREE study guides that focus on literary analysis. Includes study guides that are concise and accurate to better understand classic and contemporary Literature.
    • LitCharts: Literature Review Examples to Help You Study Fast. Includes Background Info, Plot Summary, Character Study, Theme, Summary & Analysis, Theme Tracker.
    • SparkNotes: study guides to help students learn and practice basic skills, write a paper, study for a test and achieve their academic goals. Each guide contains thorough summaries and insightful critical analysis of a nearly endless range of subjects including English literature, Shakespeare, History and Math and Science.
  • Guest, Edgar A. poems: selection from the Collected Works of Edgar A. Guest.
  • "In Search of Silence" by Chris Roe. A sample selection of Poems and Prints.
  • International Children’s Digital Library Foundation: to excite and inspire the world's children to become members of the global community–children who understand the value of tolerance and respect for diverse cultures, languages and ideas—by making the best in children's literature available online.
  • The Internet Classics Archive: Bringing the wisdom of the classics to the Internet since 1994.
  • The Irish Playography: describes itself as "a comprehensive database of all Irish plays produced professionally since 1904."
  • The James Joyce Scholars' Collection: 1) all the books are currently out-of-print and 2) they are valuable, perhaps indispensable, to those who seek a more complete understanding and appreciation of the richness of James Joyce's literary works.
  • Just So Stories by Rudyard Kipling
  • Literature Study Guides & Teacher Resources (Shmoop.com): offers learning study guides and e-books covering Literature, Poetry, Shakespeare, and Biographies.
  • LitLinks: provides guidance to the best literature research resources on the Web. LitLinks can also show you a list of Bedford/St. Martin's titles that include a given author, and what selections from that author each book contains.
  • LitQuotes - Quotes from Literature: This literary reference site features quotations from the great works of literature. You can search for quotes in a number of different ways.
  • Longfellow, Henry Wadsworth a figure of national prominence by the 1850s, and a much-beloved professor at Harvard. The site is divided into seven primary sections which include an extended biographical essay about his life and work, information about his family and his homes in Portland and Cambridge. Includes a generous selection of his poems; visitors can view a sortable list of his works, which can be arranged by poem title, first line, and publication date.
  • Lost Titles, Forgotten Rhymes (Library of Congress): How to Find a Novel, Short Story, or Poem Without Knowing its Title or Author. Locating a novel, short story, or poem without knowing its title or author can be very difficult. This guide is intended to help readers identify a literary work when they know only its plot or subject, or other textual information such as a character's name, a line of poetry, or a unique word or phrase.
  • Mark Twain Project Online: applies innovative technology to more than four decades' worth of archival research by expert editors at the Mark Twain Project. It offers unfettered, intuitive access to reliable texts, accurate and exhaustive notes, and the most recently discovered letters and documents.
  • Medieval Imaginations: created and maintained by the University of Cambridge's Faculty of English. The purpose of the site is to provide access to the "images corresponding to the main episodes dramatized in the English Mystery Plays, because these present the medieval view of human history from the Creation to the Last Judgment."
  • The Mercury Theater on the Air: features the ‘finest radio drama on the air,’ Orson Welles’s notorious "War of the Worlds." Here you’ll find not only "War of the Worlds," but many surviving shows from the series, a collection of some of the most chilling radio theater of the 1930s.
  • Online Literary Criticism Guide: This helpful guide to the best of literary criticism resources for authoritative and critical works was made possible via ipl2, the merger of the Internet Public Library (IPL) and the Librarians' Internet Index (LII), collected some of the best starting places for finding online critical writing. This resource is particularly good for finding information on English-language authors, but also includes many authors whose works have been translated into English.
  • The Oxford Book of American Essays. Many a literary theorist and critic have wondered: "What is American literature?" Late in the 19th century, one Brander Matthews was called upon to do just that-create an edited volume for the Oxford Press that would represent a variety of essays from different Americans of the time. All told, this volume published in 1914 contained 32 essays, including "John Bull" by Washington Irving, "Buds and Bird-Voices" by Nathaniel Hawthorne, and "Dante by the Bowery" by Theodore Roosevelt. Other selections include inquisitive essays by Edgar Allen Poe, Oliver Wendell Holmes, and Walt Whitman.
  • Poetry Resources (Library of Congress): A comprehensive guide to locating poetry resources available on the Library of Congress's Web site.
    • Love Poems: dedicated to the poetry lovers. Features Romantic Love Poems, Friendship Poems, Love Quotes, Love Stories and Letters. Enjoy the best love poems, inspirational poetry and more.
  • Reading Rockets: program, initiated by public television and funded by the U.S. Department of Education, that addresses how young children learn to read, why they struggle to read, and how adults can help. The Reading Rockets website takes a multimedia approach to getting information out to parents and educators. To read the site in Spanish, click on "En espanol" halfway down the page, on the left side.
  • The Robin Hood Project: designed to make available in electronic format a database of texts, images, bibliographies, and basic information about the Robin Hood stories and other outlaw tales.
  • Shakespeare, The Complete Works of William (MIT)
  • Sherlockian.net: answers all your questions about the master sleuth, his family, his colleagues, his arch enemy, 221B Baker Street, just about everything associated with Mr. Sherlock Holmes.
  • Starfall: free public service to motivate children to read with phonics. A systematic phonics approach, in conjunction with phonemic awareness practice perfect for preschool, kindergarten, first grade, second grade, special education, homeschool, and English language development (ELD, ELL, ESL.
  • Stein, Ben - The American Spectator: All Articles and Blog Posts
  • Stevenson, The Robert Louis Website celebrates Robert Louis Stevenson's life and works…not just a children's author, but also a poet, a playwright, a Gothicist, an essayist, a historian, an anthropologist, a Victorian, a Modernist and a Postmodernist, amongst other things. By detailing his diverse writing career, RLS aims to bring Stevenson out of the margins of literary study.
  • The Ultimate Guide to Destroy GRE Reading Comprehension: 57 Tips, Strategies and Speed Reading Techniques to Ace the Most Difficult Section on the GRE.
  • The Van Gogh Letters Database: The compendium includes all 820 known letters by Van Gogh, tracing his youth and late start as a painter to his spectacular blossoming in the late 1880s. "The number of letters isn't really unusual but the literary quality of the letters, that's special."
  • Walt Whitman Notebooks 1850s -1860s: Library of Congress.

       Storytelling and Folklore:               Index

  • American Folklore: Contains retellings of folktales, myths, legends, fables & fairy tales, superstitions, weatherlore, and ghost stories from all over the Americas.
  • Appalachian Literature Resources for Folktales and Storytelling.
  • Bedtime-Story: the number one children's story site of whimsical, magical, adventurous, humorous, or simply wonderfully imaginative stories for parents or teachers to read.
  • Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase and Fable: Over 18,000 derivations, sources, or origins of common phrases, allusions, and words that have a tale to tell.
  • Encyclopedia Mythica: online encyclopedia on mythology, folklore, heroes and heroines and legends. It currently contains over 7,000 entries on gods and goddesses, heroes, legendary creatures and beings from all over the world.
  • Florida Folklife from the WPA Collections, 1937-1942: During the 1930s and 1940s, teams of writers and scholars scoured the United States on behalf of the Works Progress Administration (WPA) collecting materials about the places they saw and the people they met. This particular digital ethnographic field collection brings together materials which document the Arabic, Bahamian, Cuban, Green, Seminole and Slavic cultures across Florida.
  • The Moonlit Road: Ghost stories, folktales, myths and legends haunt the moonlit back roads of the American South. Their roots in Southern culture and folklore are deep. Each month, The Moonlit Road brings you these ghost stories and other strange Southern folktales, told by the region's best storytellers.
  • National Storytelling Network (NSN): Bringing together and nurturing individuals and organizations that use the power of storytelling in all its forms.
    • The Healing Story Alliance: a special interest group of the NSN. Our goal for this special interest group is to share our experience and our skills, to increase our knowledge of stories and our knowledge of the best ways to use stories to inform, inspire, nurture and heal.
    • Interfaith Story -  a discussion group of NSN. A gathering of storytellers and listeners who share a common desire to bring the teaching and healing power of wisdom tales from around the world and sacred stories from every spiritual or faith tradition, present and past, to individuals, groups and communities.
  • Preparing to Tell a Story (Project Shalom): Storytelling is almost the oldest art in the world, the first conscious form of literary communication. There are signs of a growing interest in this ancient art, and we may yet live to see the renaissance of the storyteller and the troubadour.
  • Tim Sheppard's Storytelling Resources for Storytellers: Comprehensive collections, for storytellers, of articles, links, and information on the oral tradition and the art of storytelling.
  • Sacred Text Archive: the largest freely available archive of online books about religion, mythology, folklore. Check out subject areas along left column.
  • Story Arts Inc.: founded by storyteller/author Heather Forest. Current concert and workshop programming focuses on the ancient art of storytelling and the diverse ways that storytelling can enrich multi-cultural understanding, interpersonal communication, and literacy.
  • Storytelling Power: Through a plethora of free articles, we provide a useful guide for anyone who wants to use the power of storytelling at home, at work and in the community.
  • The Storytelling Resource Centre: the One-stop Site for All Storytellers
  • "Stories for the Seasons": dedicated to offering seasonal nature stories together with an extensive bibliography for any storyteller, teacher, or general reader who is seeking stories and legends about animals, plants, and the land itself.
  • SurLaLune Fairy Tales: 47 annotated fairy tales, including their histories, similar tales across cultures, modern interpretations and over 1,500 illustrations. Also discover over 1,600 folktales & fairy tales from around the world in more than 40 full-text eBooks. Investigate how fairy tales have served as a means of establishing moral values, teaching the younger generations about their culture and, of course, entertaining folks of all ages.
  • Urban Legends and Folklore from David Emery at About.com
  • Wit and Wisdom of Nasreddin Hodja (variously Nasrudin, Nasrettin, etc.): a legendary folk character in the Middle East and Central Asia, portrayed as a wise fool, clever simpleton, or instructive prankster. About 400 handwritten manuscripts that narrate anecdotes demonstrating his quick wit and wisdom have survived.
  • Zen Stories to Tell Your Neighbors

     Style Guides - APA, Chicago Manual, MLA, etc.:             Index

  • APA Style Tutorial: learn how to apply some basic rules of APA Style.
  • Associated Press Style: Quick Reference
  • Chicago Manual of Style Online: Visitors may register for free and gain access to the search tool for this latest edition. While this feature is certainly helpful, there are a number of equally useful aspects of the site. The first is the area that gives a number of examples of Chicago-style documentation, such as the humanities style and the well-known author-date system. Equally helpful is the "Q&A" section where the editors answer timely questions.
    • The Chicago Manual of Style - Citation Quick Guide: Presents two basic documentation systems, the humanities style (notes and bibliography) and the author-date system. Choosing between the two often depends on subject matter and nature of sources cited, as each system is favored by different groups of scholars.
  • MLA Citation Style Guide: University of Georgia Libraries - Resource Central. Based on the MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers, 6th ed., 2003.
  • Strunk & White's Elements of Style: The classic reference handbook on how to write in clear English. Intended for use in which the practice of composition is combined with the study of literature, it gives in brief space the principal requirements of plain English style and concentrates attention on the rules of usage and principles of composition most commonly violated.
  • Turabian’s A Manual for Writers of Term Papers, Theses, and Dissertations, 7th ed., 2007. Bibliographic Format for References (University of Georgia Libraries)

     Writing Guides:               Index

  • Business Writer’s Free Library Writing letters or memos in the world of business is an acquired skill, and those beginning to learn about this process will appreciate this site, which was designed by the Authenticity Counseling Company. The helpful resources offered here are divided into several sections, including "General Resources and Advice", "Basic Writing Skills", and "Basic Composition Skills". One other section is worth noting as well, and this is the section titled "Some Types of Correspondence". This is perhaps the section most relevant to business writing practices, as it includes sample memos, meeting minutes, and procedures for composing effective business emails.
  • CiteThisForMe.com - The Harvard Referencing Generator: Free generator tool designed to help students prepare their whole bibliography or reference list quickly and easily. It uses the Harvard referencing style, one of the most common referencing styles in academia.
    • A Brief Citation Guide for Internet Sources in History and the Humanities: Includes General Citation Guidelines, Bibliographic Citations, Footnote and Endnote Citations, Additional Materials on Electronic Citations.
    • Citing Electronic Sources: Library of Congress. This site includes different styles–texts, films, legal documents, maps, newspapers, photographs/drawings/cartoons, sound recordings, special presentations.
    • Landmark’s Citation Machine: Designed to assist teachers in modeling the proper use of citing information property. Students are welcome to use this as well. You merely…Click the type of resource you wish to cite - Complete the Web form that appears with information from your resource - Click "Make Citations" to generate standard Turabian, MLA,  APA & Chicago citations.
    • Writinghouse: The free, fully automatic bibliography and citation maker. Save time by creating a cited page instantly in the MLA, APA, or Chicago referencing styles!
  • Guide to Desktop Publishing (About.com): Tasks, Techniques, and Tutorials of Page Layout and Desktop Publishing
  • A Guide to Writing for College (Veritas Prep): Resources to improve your writing skills.
  • A Guide for Writing Research Papers based on MLA-style provides instruction on basic research techniques, paper formatting, and numerous examples.
    • How to Write a Research Paper: This wikiHow page summarizes the single steps of how to write a research paper in a broad overview.
    • How to Write a Research Paper: Infoplease Homework Center. Divides the process of writing a research paper into nine single steps. Each chapter contains further steps with straightforward instructions and clear examples.
    • A+ Research & Writing: Guide for high school and college students providing details, outside links, and a lot of background information for each step of writing a thesis.
    • How to Write a Paper in Scientific Journal Style and Format: Bates College has published an incredibly thorough guide to writing scientific papers. The first chapter deals with scientific writing, followed by a chapter on how to go about writing the actual paper. Most useful, however, are the "How Do I Write the…" and "How Do I…" sections, that explain the different elements and conventions of a scientific paper.
    • A Research Guide for Students: Tools for students to conduct research and to present their findings. Provides a Quick Click to Search Engines, Research, Writing, and Style Guides (MLA, APA, Chicago, Turabian, CGOS, CBE, Harvard), and Worlds of Knowledge housing some of the best education Web sites in a Virtual Library arranged by the Dewey Decimal Classification System.
    • Writing Guidelines for Engineering and Science Students designed to help students communicate their technical work. To that end, these guidelines contain advice, models, and exercises for common writing and speaking assignments in engineering and science.
  • How to Develop and Write a Grant Proposal (Congressional Research Service): To assist grant seekers in districts and states, and it includes writing proposals for both government and private foundations grants. The second section of the report covers the actual writing of the proposal, from outlining of project goals, stating the purpose and objectives of the proposal, explaining the program methods to solve the stated problem, and how the results of the project will be evaluated, to long-term project planning, and, finally, developing the proposal budget.
  • How to Prepare an Annotated Bibliography (Cornell University Library)
  • Free Microsoft Word Templates for Letterheads, Newsletters, Proposal, and more.
  • National Writing Project Teachers and others will enjoy this website from the National Writing Project, as it is replete with strategies for getting young people excited about writing. The materials are divided largely into the sections Art/Craft, Teach/Learn, Provocations, and Community.
    • 30 Ideas for Teaching Writing: Winner of the Association of Education Publishers Distinguished Achievement Award for Instructional Materials. The National Writing Project (NWP) does a spot-on job of bringing together a raft of resources for those teaching writing at all levels of interest and instruction. These thirty ideas are a great way to get started, and include tips that originated as full-length articles in various NWP publications.
    • Teaching Writing Resource Topics – The National Writing Project (NWP).
  • PaperRater: Diligent students should make sure that their work is well-written, original, coherent, and grammatically correct. PaperRater is a free web service with robust grammar and spell checking, plagiarism detection, and writing suggestions to improve your writing.
  • Publishing Advice for Graduate Students (Social Science Research Network): Advice is given on how to publish everything from book reviews to articles, replies to book chapters, and how to secure both edited book contracts and authored monograph contracts, along with plenty of helpful tips and advice on the publishing world (and how it works) along the way in what is meant to be a comprehensive, concrete guide to publishing that should be of tremendous value to graduate students working in any area of the humanities and social sciences.
  • Ten Mistakes Writers Don't See (But Can Easily Fix When They Do): Following is a list to refer people to before they submit anything in writing to anybody (agent, publisher, your mom, your boss). From email messages and front-page news in the New York Times to published books and magazine articles, the 10-ouchies listed here crop up everywhere. They're so pernicious that even respected Internet columnists are not immune.
  • Writing Skills (Infoplease) dedicated to helping develop communication skills. Includes tips on writing Essays, Research Papers, Biographies, Book Reports, Five Paragraph Essays, Bibliographies, Speech Writing, Spelling & Grammar, Sentence Structure and other topics.
    • Amherst College -  Online Resources for Writers. A fine set of online resources for use by their Amherst students and members of the web-browsing public. This particular set includes a long list of resources divided into thematic headings such as "Preparing to Write," "Thesis and Argument," "Clarity and Grace," and "Using Sources."
    • Harvard College Writing Center: Brief Guides to Writing Papers in the Disciplines. Includes Strategies for Essay Writing and Disciplinary Writing Guides.
    • KU Writing Center - Undergraduate & Graduate Writing Guides: Academic Essays | Avoiding Plagiarism | Critical Thinking, Reading, and Study Strategies | The Writing Process | Writing Your Research | Citing and Documenting Your Sources | Grammar and Usage | For ESL Learners | Personal and Professional Writing | Theses and Dissertations | Writing in Your Courses.
    • OWL – Purdue University Online Writing Lab: English Grammar, Punctuation, and Spelling. Plus, a section of handouts and resources for English as a Second Language learners.
    • Princeton UniversityAcademic Integrity and Plagiarism, Advice on Academic Writing, Grammar's Nuts and Bolts.
    • University College Writing Workshop: University of Toronto's Writing Centre provides dozens of helpful writing tips. The handouts cover topics like organizing an essay, the effective and correct use of quotations, and the use of articles. Each section includes specific advice and guidance. Composition instructors may also wish to recommend this site to their students if they are looking for additional high-quality writing resources.
    • Writer's Handbook (University of Wisconsin-Madison) This useful web resource from The Writing Center at the University of Wisconsin-Madison offers guidance on improving your writing style, avoiding common grammar and punctuation mistakes, and using proper citations.
    • The Writing Center at Franciscan University Includes Dictionaries | Thesauri | Encyclopedias | APA | MLA | Chicago | Turabian | Research | Writing Process Avoiding Plagiarism | Grammar & Style | Rhetoric | Misc. Writing Resources.
    • Writing Center Handouts (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill): Resources on the art and craft of effective college-level writing. The materials are divided into four areas: "Writing the Paper," "Citation, Style, and Sentence Level Concerns," "Specific Writing Assignments/Contexts," and "Writing for Specific Fields." The "Writing for Specific Fields" area is a great place for students who have declared a major, and each piece contains a bit of background on the nature of writing in each field.
    • Writing in College: A Short Guide to College Writing (University of Chicago). The guide was created with first and second year students…in mind, but it can be used effectively with a wide range of students who wish to write clearly and concisely.…It is an indispensable resource for any and all persons who wish to succeed in becoming better writers in college.
    • Writing Explained: Free online writing class that provides writing examples, sentences, and style advice according to AP and Chicago Style.
History:               Index

  • 9/11 Memorial: National September 11 Memorial & Museum. "May the lives remembered, the deeds recognized, and the spirit reawakened be eternal beacons, which reaffirm respect for life, strengthen our resolve to preserve freedom, and inspire an end to hatred, ignorance and intolerance." Also includes Education Goals and Key Questions, and Teaching Guides. Includes Search by Name or Company, Memorial Names Layout, Search by Sponsor of Honoree.
  • The American Catholic History Classroom: Created as a curriculum supplement on specific topics from American Catholic history that provide teachers with background information, related primary source documents, information and questions for students, and suggestions for further reading. Includes: Catholics and Industrialization, Catholics and a Living Wage, Catholics and Education, Catholics and Labor, and Catholics and Race.
    • Catholic History: Resource for students, teachers, researchers, and anyone interested in the history of Catholicism in the United States. Its purpose is to promote deeper and wider understanding of the place of Catholics and the Catholic Church in the history of the United States of America.
    • "We Hold These Truths: Catholic Reflections on the American Proposition" - 50th Anniversary of Father John Courtney Murray, SJ's publication The Jesuit's influential work, subtitled "Catholic Reflections on the American Proposition," has received much praise and criticism over the ensuing decades.
  • The American Founders Online: An Annotated Guide to Their Papers and Publications. Library of Congress Digital Reference Section.
  • American Journeys (Wisconsin Historical Society & National History Day): contains more than 18,000 pages of eyewitness accounts of North American exploration, from the sagas of Vikings in Canada in AD1000 to the diaries of mountain men in the Rockies 800 years later, plus a digital library and learning center.
  • Annenberg Classroom: The Leonore Annenberg Institute for Civics. Resources for Excellent Civics Education.
  • The Archives of Irish America: a repository of primary research materials at New York University that aims to transform our understanding of the Irish migration experience and the distillation of American Irish ethnicity over the past century.
  • Benjamin Franklin: In His Own Words. A Library of Congress exhibit looks at the depth and breadth of Benjamin Franklin's public, professional, and scientific accomplishments through important documents, letters, books, broadsides, and cartoons. Marking the tercentenary of Franklin's birth, this exhibition, concentrates on his achievements as a printer and writer, an inventor and scientist, and, particularly, as a politician and statesman.
  • Best of History: an award-winning portal created for history teachers, students, and general history enthusiasts. BOHWS contains annotated links to over 1000 history web sites as well links to hundreds of quality K-12 history lesson plans, history teacher guides, history activities, history games, history quizzes, and more throughout its pages.
  • A Brief Citation Guide for Internet Sources in History and the Humanities Includes General Citation Guidelines, Bibliographic Citations, Footnote and Endnote Citations, Additional Materials on Electronic Citations.
  • Catholic Conscience and Public Policy: Pennsylvania Catholic Conference
  • Churchill & the Great Republic: LOC 'examines the life and career of Winston Spencer Churchill and emphasizes his lifelong links with the United States - the nation he called "the great Republic." Follow this great statesman through the 'Finest Hour,' the 'Sword of Freedom,' 'Unity and Strategy' as World War II ended and finally into Sir Winston's second premiership and the Cold War…
  • The Civil Rights Litigation Clearinghouse: a collection of documents and information about civil rights cases in selected case categories across the United States. Currently, the categories include: Child Welfare, Election/Voting Rights, Immigration, Jail Conditions, Juvenile Institution, Mental Health Facility, Mental Retardation Facility, Nursing Home Conditions, Police Non-Profiling, Police Profiling, Prison Conditions, Public Housing, School Desegregation.
    • United States Commission on Civil Rights - Historical Publications: The United States Government Printing Office (GPO) teams up with the United States Commission on Civil Rights (USCCR) and the Thurgood Marshall Law Library, University of Maryland School of Law, to provide the American public a website of authentic Civil Rights historical publications.
  • C-SPAN Classroom: To enhance the teaching of social studies through C-SPAN’s primary source programming and website.
  • The Comanche National Museum & Cultural Center (CNMCC): offers visitors a glimpse of traditional cultural items and detailed history about the Comanche People. 2010 Oklahoma Museums Association Award Winner for Best Website.
  • Digital History: using newstechnologies to enhance teaching and research. Includes sections on  History Reference Room, For Teachers, History Writing Guides, and more.
  • National Archives – Docs Teach: Thousands of primary source documents to bring the past to life as classroom teaching tools from the billions preserved at the National Archives. Check out some themed DocsTeach pages: National History Day Rights and Responsibilities in History, Teaching with the Records of Congress, American Revolution, Founding of a Nation, Teaching with Civil War Documents, and more.
  • Edison National Historic Site: learn more about Thomas Edison and his patents. There is a section for Grade 4 and Up where a grade appropriate timeline, a brief biography, 'FAQ's and Fables' and information on Edison's 'Big Three' inventions can be found. Check out the 'For Teachers' section for additional teaching resources and support.
  • Egypt Guide (National Geographic): An excellent presentation of the pyramids of Egypt. Take a virtual expedition to King Tut's tomb, view photos and a video aired on the National Geographic Channel and participate in the 'Interactive Features.' Teachers and parents will appreciate the Lesson Plans with age specific designations, plans that will help students understand more about these ancient mysteries.
  • Geography Quiz - Middle East: Did you know "the Middle East"' stretches as far west as the Western Sahara in Africa? What is the smallest Middle Eastern country? Test your knowledge on a new drag-and-drop challenge by clicking the link or the map graphic. (All ages).
  • Historical and Public Figures: A General Portrait File to the 1920s. Over 30,00 portraits of a wide-range of public figures, including political, religious, cultural, literary and artistic personalities, with an emphasis on the 16th - 19th-centuries. Includes some original prints, but is principally printed pictures.
  • History of Labor Day (Dept. of Labor): Celebrated on the first Monday in September. A creation of the labor movement and dedicated to the social and economic achievements of American workers. It constitutes a yearly national tribute to the contributions workers have made to the strength, prosperity, and well-being of our country.
    • Labor Day (History.com): Pays tribute to the contributions and achievements of American workers. It was created by the labor movement in the late 19th century and became a federal holiday in 1894. Labor Day also symbolizes the end of summer for many Americans, and is celebrated with parties, parades and athletic events.
  • The History Place: presents a fact-based, common sense approach in the presentation of the history of humanity, with great care given to accuracy. Includes a Great Speeches Collection.
  • Historical Thinking Matters: Focused on key topics in U.S. history, designed to teach students how to critically read primary sources and how to critique and construct historical narratives.
  • History Lesson Plans (LessonCorner.com): lesson plans and worksheets
  • History Matters - U.S. Survey Course on the Web: Visitors will find three primary sections. In "Many Pasts", visitors can explore over 1000 primary documents, including photographic images and audio interviews. "Making Sense of Evidence" provides material on how historians approach resources as they attempt to craft intelligent and erudite narratives. The final section, "www.history", contains brief reviews of over 800 websites that address various aspects of American history. The site also contains a number of other gems, including "Secrets of Great History Teachers", which features interviews with those who impart the knowledge of the ages with wisdom and insight.
  • The HistoryNet.com: contains daily features, photo galleries and over 1,200 articles originally published in our various magazines. Brought to you by the Weider History Group, a group of ten history magazines published in Leesburg, VA.
  • Historic Government Publications From World War II: a project of Southern Methodist University’s (SMU) Central University Libraries. The organization of the site encourages browsing; you can browse all documents via an alphabetical title list, or jump right to a special collection of (fascinating) Pocket Guides to foreign nations prepared during the war for U.S. servicemen.
  • Independence Day - Fourth of July (USA.gov): honors the birthday of the United States of America and the adoption of the Declaration of Independence on July 4, 1776. Includes: U.S. Flag History and Facts, Declaration of Independence & Historical Documents.
  • Internet for Historians - Virtual Training Suite: an interactive step-by-step guide created to help historians make the best use of Internet resources in their academic work.
  • Islam & Europe - Bernard Lewis - 2007 Irving Kristol Lecture (American Enterprise Institute for Public Policy Research). The 2007 Kristol Award was presented to Bernard Lewis, the Cleveland E. Dodge Professor of Near Eastern Studies Emeritus at Princeton University, and long the free world’s preeminent student and interpreter of Islam, the Ottoman Empire, and the modern Middle East.
  • Martin Luther King, Jr. Day: American clergyman and civil-rights leader. Internet resources at Ask.com | Google.
  • Lee Family Digital Archive: Housed at Washington and Lee University, the Lee Family Digital Archive (LFDA) was established to create a comprehensive annotated edition of all the known papers of the immigrant founder Richard Lee (who lived in the 17th century) and his offspring.
  • Liberty and the American Revolution  (Princeton University): Features more than 150 recently gifted important books, pamphlets and prints representing…the intellectual origins of the American Revolution; the Revolution itself; the early years of the republic; the resulting spread of democratic ideas in the Atlantic world; and the effort to abolish the slave trade in both Great Britain and the United States. Visitors should not miss the exquisite edition of Thomas Paine's celebrated "The age of reason: being an investigation of true and fabulous theology," printed while Paine was imprisoned in 1794.
  • Medieval Institute Library - Hesburgh Libraries (University of Notre Dame)
  • The Napoleonic Guide: The best reference source for everything you need to know about the life and times of Napoleon Bonaparte. It has more than 2500 pages of information covering all aspects of the greatest era in world history.
  • National Flag Day (U.S.A.) - June 14. "On June 14th, 1885, Bernard J. Cigrand, a 19 year old teacher at Stony Hill School, placed a 10 inch, 38- star flag in a bottle on his desk then assigned essays on the flag and its significance. This observance, commemorated Congresses adoption of the Stars and Stripes as the flag of the United States on June 14, 1777" (The National Flag Day Foundation).
  • National Geographic Education – Teachers Homepage: Includes resources for educators who wish to incorporate spatial knowledge, cultural geography, and a wide range of related subjects into their classrooms.
  • National History Education Clearinghouse (U.S. Dept. of Education): designed to help K-12 history teachers access resources and materials to improve U.S. history education in the classroom. Areas to explore are "History Content," "Teaching Materials," "Issues & Research" and the "Weekly Quiz."
  • National Underground Railroad Freedom Center: February is Black History Month. The Freedom Center opened in Cincinnati, Ohio in August of 2004. Their mission is to 'reveal stories about freedom's heroes, past and present, challenging and inspiring everyone to take courageous steps for freedom today.'
  • New York Heritage: Research portal for students, educators, historians, genealogists, and others who are interested in the Empire State's history. The site contains information from over 160 collections from library, museums, archives, and other resources across the state of New York.
  • "The North American Indian" by Edward S. Curtis: one of the most significant and controversial representations of traditional American Indian culture ever produced. Issued in a limited edition from 1907-1930, the publication continues to exert a major influence on the image of Indians in popular culture.
    • Indians of North America–Selected Resources (LOC): This guide is a compilation of many of the resources on the Indians of North America available at the Library of Congress as well as selected resources outside the Library.
    • Native American Sites: dedicated to facilitating communication among Native peoples and between Indians and non-Indians and also to providing links to other sites that contain solid information about American Indians. The links are well-organized with entries including individual nations, language, culture including pow-wows and festivals, education, as well as other topics.
  • The Ohio Historical Society: "...to promote a knowledge of archaeology and history, especially in Ohio." The society exists to interpret, preserve, collect, and make available evidence of the past, and to provide leadership on furthering knowledge, understanding, and appreciation of the prehistory and history of Ohio and of the broader cultural and natural environments of which Ohio is a part.
  • The OldMapsOnline Portal: an easy-to-use gateway to historical maps in libraries around the world. Search for online digital historical maps across numerous different collections via a geographical search. Search by typing a place-name or by clicking in the map window, and narrow by date. The search results provide a direct link to the map image on the website of the host institution.
  • Russia Engages the World, 1453-1825: traces Russia's movement from relative isolation to global empire through its contacts with Europe, Asia, and the Americas. Divided into five sections, 'each of which considers Russian and world history during a given period.' The sections are composed of essays and visual accompaniments that cover the history, maps, personalities, themes, events and special features.
    • The Empire That Was Russia: Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii was photographer to the Russian Tzar Nicholas II. The photographs on this site 'offer a vivid portrait of a lost world--the Russian Empire on the eve of World War I and the coming revolution.'
  • Teaching American History: Ashbrook Center for Public Affairs, Ashland University. Learn more about American history by going back to the original source documents, from the founding through the 20th century and beyond. Includes Document Library, Special Exhibits on the American Founding, Lesson Plans (NEH), and Online Audio Lectures and Discussions.
  • Teaching with Primary Sources Program – Library of Congress (LOC): Works with educational institutions to deliver professional development programs that help teachers use the LOC's rich reservoir of digitized primary source materials to design challenging, high-quality instruction.
    • Teaching with Primary Sources (Stanford): The Stanford University project focuses on using primary sources in the middle and high school history classroom.
    • Reading Like a Historian (Stanford): The curriculum teaches students how to investigate historical questions employing reading strategies such as sourcing, contextualizing, corroborating, and close reading. Instead of memorizing historical facts, students evaluate the trustworthiness of multiple perspectives on issues…and make historical claims backed by documentary evidence.
  • Tools for Peace Building (U.S. Institute of Peace): A range of material for practitioners in the field, including handbooks such as the Peacemaker’s Toolkit series on mediation, reference works such as Peace Terms, and guidelines on civilian-military operations.
  • U.S. History Learning Study Guides & Teacher Resources (Shmoop.com): offers learning study guides and e-books.
  • World Atlas: Maps and Geography of the World. This online World Atlas includes maps and geographical information for the following entities: Alphabetical Listing of Countries and Continents, Blank Outline Maps of Each Country, Countries Listed by Continent & Region, U.S. States and Territories.

       Military History and Wars:               Index

  • Digital Collections of the Library of Congress:  A Guide to the American Revolution | A Guide to the American Civil War | A Guide to the War of 1812 | A Guide to the Mexican War | A Guide to the Spanish-American War | A Guide to World War I | A Guide to World War II
  • The Price of Freedom: Americans at War. A presentation by the Smithsonian Institution outlining how Americans have gone to war to win their independence, expand their national boundaries, define their freedoms, and defend their interests around the globe.
  • The War That Made America: The dramatic PBS documentary tells the story of the French and Indian War (1754-1763), which began in the wilderness of the Pennsylvania frontier and spread throughout the colonies, into Canada, and ultimately around the world.
  • Coming of the American Revolution (1764-1776): Before the American Revolution, the British colonies along the eastern seaboard of North America were a rather disparate group of competing entities. Strong dissatisfaction with various policies of the British government stirred them to action during the 1760s and 1770s. This fine website from the Massachusetts Historical Society takes visitors inside that struggle through official documents, personal correspondence, and newspaper pieces from those tumultuous decades.
    • USHistory.org (The Independence Hall Association): our mission is to educate the public about the Revolutionary and Colonial eras of American history, as well as Philadelphia generally.
    • The Rochambeau Map Collection contains cartographic items used by Jean Baptiste Donatien de Vimeur, comte de Rochambeau (1725-1807), when he was commander in chief of the French expeditionary army (1780-82) during the American Revolution. The maps were from Rochambeau's personal collection, cover much of eastern North America, and date from 1717 to 1795.
  • American Civil War: collection of online resources about the Civil War and includes graphics, letters and information about specific battles, music, fictional accounts of wartime and a host of other civil war related subjects.
    • American Civil War - National Park Service: The American Civil War remains a complex and interesting subject. This omnibus website provided by the National Park Service provides a number of thematic sections that include "Civil War Education", "Civil War Parks", and "African Americans in the Civil War". For those who may be less familiar with the basic events and chronology of the Civil War, there is a section titled "About the Civil War" which provides a detailed timeline of events, an area of stories about the Civil War.
    • Britain and the American Civil War: During the Civil War, both the Confederacy and the Union tried to curry favor with Britain in order to support their respective causes. This online exhibition explores these relationships through original period maps, photographs, diplomatic documents, and much more.
    • Gilmer Civil Wars Maps Collection: During a long career in the United States and Confederate States of American Armies, Jeremy Francis Gilmer served as an engineer. Responsible for constructing fortifications and conducting land surveys, he created dozens of maps and other such documents. All told, this digitized collection at the University of North Carolina Library currently contains 161 maps, plans, and land surveys, spanning the region from Alabama to Virginia. There are some real gems in this collection, including a map of the battlegrounds of Shiloh in 1862 and a map detailing the military defenses along a portion of the coast of Texas.
    • Maine Civil War Stories Collection: Narratives and stories about the Civil War with a slant to Maine citizens and locations. There are over 150 stories available.
    • Mathew Brady Civil War Photographs The U.S. National Archives has digitized over 6,000 images from the series "Mathew Brady Photographs of Civil War-Era Personalities and Scenes."
    • The Star Spangled Banner by Francis Scott Key. All four stanzas, along with historical background.
    • The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies.
  • First World War: The seven-part series from the Guardian and Observer on the history of the first world war. This intriguing site created by the Guardian newspaper in Britain features slideshows, articles, and a set of external links to additional websites of note.
  • World War II (1939 to 1945) (BBC): On This Day. Britain and France joined the war on 3 September 1939. A compilation of key stories as they broke throughout the war.
    • Untold Stories of D-Day (National Geographic): "A grand hoax, top secret maps, and live-ammunition rehearsals set the stage for June 6, 1944, when 200,000 soldiers stormed Normandy's beaches to help free Europe."
    • Remembering D-Day, June 6, 1944: Codenamed Operation Overlord, the Battle of Normandy began (History.com).
    • World War II Military Situation Maps, 1944-1945: The Library of Congress: Contains 416 printed maps and covers June 6, 1944 to July 26, 1945. The maps show daily details on military campaigns in western Europe. They can be browsed by date or place (Ardennes, Europe, France (Normandy), or Germany).
    • World War II in Photos - a Retrospective in 20 Parts: Originally posted weekly to TheAtlantic.com from June 19 – October 30, 2011, running every Sunday morning for 20 weeks.
    • The Atomic Bomb and the End of World War II: A Collection of Primary Sources released by. The National Security Archive. Edited by William Burr, this book contains 77 declassified US government documents on the atomic bomb and the end of the war in the Pacific theater of operations.
  • Memorial Day (USA.gov): a federal holiday observed the last Monday in May, commemorates the men and women who died while in the military service. A national moment of remembrance takes place at 3:00 p.m. local time.
    • Memorial Day (US Dept of Veterans’ Affairs)
    • Memorial Day (History Channel): Officially observed on the last Monday of May, honors men and women who died while serving in the American military. Originally known as Decoration Day, it originated in the years following the Civil War and became an official federal holiday in 1971.
    • Memorial Day (InfoPlease.com).
  • The World Memory Project - Ancestry.com: "The United States Holocaust Memorial Museum and Ancestry.com announce the launch of the World Memory Project. The goal is to build the largest free online resource for information about victims and survivors of the Holocaust and Nazi persecution during World War II."
  • Veterans Day - November 11: On the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month of 1918, an armistice, or temporary cessation of hostilities, was declared between the Allied nations and Germany in the First World War, then known as "the Great War." Commemorated as Armistice Day beginning the following year, November 11th became a legal federal holiday in the United States in 1938.
    • The History of Veterans Day - Military.com
    • Veterans History Project (VHP): As a partner with filmmaker Ken Burns and PBS on The War, this special Web site enhances the viewing experience of this epic yet intimate look at those who sacrificed so much to serve their country during World War II.
    • Virtual Vietnam Wall: Names of Vietnam War Casualties by City and State. First click on a state. When it opens, scroll down to the city and the names will appear. Then click on their names. It should show you a picture of the person, or at least their bio and medals.
  • The Directory of U.S. Military Rockets and Missiles: concise information about all missiles and rockets, which have received a numerical designation in the DOD's joint Designation System for Unmanned Aerospace Vehicles since 27 June 1963.
  • U.S. Army Center of Military History: First-time visitors may wish to start at the Medal of Honor area, which provides some detailed information about this most celebrated award, along with its recipients. Visitors shouldn't leave without looking over The Green Books series. This series covers all aspects of the Army's involvement in World War II; titles include "The War in the Pacific," "The Middle East Theater," and "The Technical Services."

       U.S. Presidents and Government:               Index

  • USA.gov: The U.S. government's official web portal makes it easy for the public to get U.S. government information and services on the web.
  • The American Founders Online: An Annotated Guide to Their Papers and Publications. Online access, in varying degrees, to the personal papers and/or publications of the major founders of the American Republic—that is, those men who served in roles of national political leadership between 1765 and 1815.
    • The Charters of Freedom - The National Archives: Features primary documents that shaped U.S. history. See images of the Declaration of Independence, Constitution, and Bill of Rights. Learn about the Articles of Confederation, Constitutional Convention, Marbury v. Madison, Louisiana Purchase, slavery, Civil War, 13th Amendment, immigration, and woman suffrage.
    • Documents from the Continental Congress and the Constitutional Convention, 1774-1789: from the LOC's Library's Rare Books and Special Collections Division. Contains 274 documents relating to the work of Congress and the drafting and ratification of the Constitution. Items include extracts of the journals of Congress, resolutions, proclamations, committee reports, treaties, and early printed versions of the United States Constitution and the Declaration of Independence.
    • The Federalist Papers (Thomas - Library of Congress): The original text of the Federalist Papers (also known as The Federalist) was obtained from the e-text archives of Project Gutenberg.
    • Founding Fathers Info Guide: Contains The Federalist Papers Online, One of the most important works on political theory | Other founding documents: The Declaration of Independence, The U.S. Constitution, The Bill of Rights, and other Amendments to the Constitution | The American Flag | History of the USA | Founding Fathers Image Gallery | Founding Fathers Quotes. No student of American History should pass up such a good introduction to the early history of the republic!
  • American Government (USHistory.org): "What is the purpose of government?" It is an experiment thousands of years in the making.
    • How Does the Government Work? "When the founding fathers designed the United States government they considered how they would make sure that it would work well. The first goal was to design a government that would not be unfair."
  • The Architect of the Capitol: Responsible to the United States Congress for the maintenance, operation, development, and preservation of the United States Capitol Complex, which includes the Capitol, the congressional office buildings, the Library of Congress buildings, the Supreme Court building, the U.S. Botanic Garden, the Capitol Power Plant, and other facilities.
  • Ben's Guide to U.S. Government for Kids: Provides learning tools for K-12 students, parents, and teachers. These resources will teach how our government works, the use of the primary source materials of Government Printing Office (GPO) Access, and how one can use GPO Access to carry out their civic responsibilities.
  • "Character Above All" - An Exploration of Presidential Leadership: Companion website to PBS's "Character Above All" broadcast. Contains transcripts, Essays by historians and political theorists on selected presidents, and selected "Quotes" by former Presidents of the United States and others. Aired on May 29, 1996, this site explains its uniqueness in the following manner: "What started as a voice crying in the wilderness is now reaching a growing audience who believe that the issue is character above all. And it's an obligation conferred on us as citizens to focus on it." This site can be the starting point for your research into presidential character!
  • Civics Learning Study Guides & Teacher Resources (Shmoop.com): offers learning study guides and e-books.
  • Congressional Research Tutorials (UC Berkeley Library): tutorials on how to find Congressional materials in the Library and on the Internet. Click on any tutorial in the left-hand sidebar.
  • The Constitution of the United States of America - Annotated: Analysis and Interpretation (popularly known as the Constitution Annotated). Provides legal analysis and interpretation of the United States Constitution, based primarily on Supreme Court case law.
    • Constitution Day Resources (LOC): The Library of Congress resources for Constitution Day activities. Explore the Creating the United States online exhibit and learn more about the impact of the Constitution, Bill of Rights and Declaration of Independence on U.S. history.
    • Conversations on the Constitution: a new program of the ABA Division for Public Education to encourage civil discussion and debate about the meaning of some of the Constitution's concepts and clauses that have been the subject of ongoing constitutional debates. Includes Lesson Plans and Resources, and full text of the U.S. Constitution.
    • National Constitution Center: devoted to the most powerful vision of freedom ever expressed: the U.S. Constitution. Located on Independence Mall in Historic Philadelphia, the birthplace of American freedom, the Center illuminates constitutional ideals and inspires active citizenship through a state-of-the-art museum experience, including hundreds of interactive exhibits, films and rare artifacts; must-see feature exhibitions…
  • C-SPAN Classroom: "to enhance the teaching of Civics & U.S. Government through C-SPAN's primary source programming." Visitors can start their journey by viewing the "Clip of the Week", and then looking through the other thematic sections on the site, which include "Principles of Government", "Legislative Branch", and "Political Participation".
  • GovTrack.us: tool by Civic Impulse, LLC to help the public research and track the activities in the U.S. Congress, promoting and innovating government transparency and civic education through novel uses of technology. You'll find here the status of U.S. federal legislation, voting records for the Senate and House of Representatives, information on Members of Congress, district maps, as well as congressional committees and the Congressional Record.
    • Government Information Online: Ask a Librarian. An online reference service to the American public. This unique free web based "Ask a Librarian" service will give the public an opportunity to ask librarians questions about government resources.
    • GovSpot.com: non-partisan government information portal designed to simplify the search for the best and most relevant government information online.
    • Legistalker: Track Activity of US Congressmen & Senators. View what they have voted on (motions, amendments, resolutions etc.), browse news mentions in online media sources (newspapers, blogs, magazines, YouTube videos) and follow their Twitter updates.
    • OpenCongress: brings together official government data with news coverage, blog posts, comments with a mission to make Congress more transparent and to encourage civic engagement.
    • Scout: an alerts service for updates on federal and state legislation, as well as speeches in Congress and Federal regulations. Use Scout to track when legislation important to you moves ahead in Congress or in state houses.
  • Jefferson County (Ohio) Board of Elections: Includes Voter Registration Information, Polling Locations, Polling Place Locator, Election Results.
  • J.F. Kennedy Presidential Library & Museum: to advance the study and understanding of President Kennedy's life and career and the times in which he lived; and to promote a greater appreciation of America's political and cultural heritage, the process of governing and the importance of public service.
  • Kids.gov: the official kids' portal for the U.S. government. Organized into three audiences: Grades K-5, Grades 6-8, and Educators. Each audience tab is divided into educational subjects like Arts, Math, and History. Within each subject, the websites are grouped as either government sites (Federal, state, military) or other resources (commercial, non-profit, educational).
  • POTUS - Presidents of the United States: includes background information, election results, cabinet members, notable events, and some points of interest on each of the presidents. Links to biographies, historical documents, audio and video files, and other presidential sites are also included.
    • The Presidential Timeline: Highlights Pivotal Events in 20th Century American Presidencies. Provides a single point of access to an ever-growing selection of digitized assets from the collections of the twelve Presidential Libraries of the National Archives. Among these assets you’ll find documents, photographs, audio recordings, and video relating to the events of the presidents’ lives.
    • Presidents of the United States - Resource Guides (LOC): selection of primary source materials associated with the presidents of the United States, including manuscripts, letters, broadsides, government documents, prints, photographs, sheet music, sound recordings, and films.
    • American President - A Reference Resource: Resources on the U.S. Presidents (University of Virginia). In-depth information reviewed by prominent scholars on each president and their administration that cover various aspects of their life and leadership strategy. Includes a Presidential Photo Gallery and Speech Archive.
    • The American Presidency Project (AmericanPresidency.org) at the University of California, Santa Barbara. Archives contain 105,681 documents related to the study of the Presidency.
    • Profile of the American Presidency - Encyclopedia Britannica: Read about the presidents and explore the electoral process, election results, images, video, and important documents related to the evolution of the nation's highest office.
    • Historical Look at the Inaugural Ceremonies since 1789. Joint Congressional Committee on Inaugural Ceremonies, U.S. Senate Historian.
    • George Washington's Mount Vernon - Digital Encyclopedia. Drawing on a range of primary sources, this project brings together hundreds of entries divided into over a dozen topics, including Agriculture, American Revolution, American West, Family, Military, Personal, Presidency, and more.
    • Thomas Jefferson - A Resource Guide (LOC). The digital collections of the Library of Congress contain a wide variety of material associated with Thomas Jefferson. Consisting of approximately 27,000 documents, this is the largest collection of original Jefferson documents in the world.
    • J.F. Kennedy Presidential Library & Museum: Life of J.F. Kennedy, Historic Speeches, Virtual Museum Tour, Ernest Hemingway Collection, Students Explore resources and activities on JFK and the Kennedy years, Profile in Courage essay contest , and more.
  • The Theodore Roosevelt Association: Chartered by Act of Congress in 1920, provides authoritative information on the life and ideals of Theodore Roosevelt. Includes TR’s speeches, cartoons and curriculum-based lesson plans 5th-12th.
    • Theodore Roosevelt: His Life and Times on Film. Roosevelt’s everyday life was chronicled on a large scale by several motion picture companies from the Spanish-American War in 1898 to his death in 1919. This collection from the American Memory project at the Library of Congress offers up 87 films from the Theodore Roosevelt Association Collection.
    • Theodore Roosevelt Center at Dickinson State University: Gathers together…all Roosevelt-related items, to make his legacy more readily accessible to scholars and schoolchildren,…Items in the digital library include correspondence to and from Roosevelt, diary entries, notes, political cartoons, scrapbooks, newspaper columns and magazine articles by and about Roosevelt, speeches, and photographs.…view film clips and listen to audio recordings.
  • State and Local Government Internet Directory: provides convenient one-stop access to the websites of thousands of state agencies and city and county governments.
  • State of the Union Addresses of the American Presidents: Search and analyze the the full-text of all State of the Union Addresses from 1790.
  • ThisNation.com: repository of basic information, resources and historical documents related to American Government and Politics. Our primary goal is to promote more effective participation in the American political system by providing factual, non-partisan information about government and politics in the United States of America.
  • THOMAS - Library of Congress: to make Federal legislative information freely available to the Internet public.
  • Thomas Jefferson -  A Resource Guide (LOC). The digital collections of the Library of Congress contain a wide variety of material associated with Thomas Jefferson. Consisting of approximately 27,000 documents, this is the largest collection of original Jefferson documents in the world.
  • U.S. Dept. of the Treasury's Education Resources: learn about the history of the Treasury Department, its role in the Federal government, and its mission to serve you, includes teacher lesson plans.
  • The Council on Foreign Relations: an independent, national membership organization and a nonpartisan center for scholars dedicated to producing and disseminating ideas so that individual and corporate members, as well as policymakers, journalists, students, and interested citizens in the United States and other countries, can better understand the world and the foreign policy choices facing the United States and other governments.
    • CFR Education: gateway for professors, teachers, and students in search of tools and resources to increase their understanding of U.S. foreign policy and international relations.
  • U.S. Presidents Day -  officially known as Washington's Birthday, is a federal holiday in the United States and is celebrated on the third Monday of February. In 2009, Presidents Day falls on February 16.
    • The Presidents of the USA -  Since George Washington's election in 1789, 44 men have served as President of the United States. They have led in times of peace and war, hardship and plenty, and served in tenures as short as one month and as long as 12 years. Learn more about America's Presidents.
  • U.S. Department of State - Office of the Historian: to provide better access to the official historical documentary records of U.S. foreign policy. The Office is responsible for writing and researching historical studies on various aspects of U.S. diplomacy for use by policymakers, and for the public at large.
    • Foreign Relations of the United States (FRUS): This important United States government series serves as the official documentary historical record of major foreign policy decisions. Produced by the State Department’s Office of the Historian, many of these printed volumes have been digitized and placed online here as part of the University of Wisconsin Digital Collections project.
  • Virtual Tour—The White House -  This virtual exhibit takes the visitor on tours of various rooms and areas of the White House. The White House curator gives a video presentation of the art and furnishings on the State Floor.
  • Votetocracy: where every citizen can see every bill currently in congress, vote on those bills and send those votes to their representatives.
  • We the People -  Library of Congress (LOC) presents a compendium of American history online resources for teachers and students.

       Abraham Lincoln:               Index

  • The Abraham Lincoln Association: Includes The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, 1953, The Abraham Lincoln Association Serials, which includes The Abraham Lincoln Quarterly, 1940-1952, Bulletin of the Abraham Lincoln Association, 1923-1939, Lincoln Centennial Association Addresses, 1909-1918, and the Lincoln Monographs.
  • Abraham Lincoln Historical Digitization Project - Lincoln.net: Northern Illinois University presents historical materials from Abraham Lincoln's Illinois years (1830-1861), including his writings and speeches, campaign songs as well as other materials illuminating antebellum Illinois.
  • Abraham Lincoln Internet Resources: Ask.com and Google.
  • Abraham Lincoln Research Site: Abraham Lincoln's life and accomplishments.
  • The Alfred Whital Stern Collection of Lincolniana: This truly astonishing collection from the Library of Congress's American Memory project presents over 1300 items with more than 4000 total images from the years 1824 to 1931. Includes: sheet music, broadsides, prints, cartoons, maps, drawings, and campaign tickets related to Lincoln's life and times. This truly astonishing collection from the Library of Congress's American Memory project presents over 1300 items with more than 4000 total images from the years 1824 to 1931.
  • Lincoln 200 Years (C-Span): February 12, 2009 marked the 200th anniversary of Abraham Lincoln's birth. The materials on the site are divided into five sections including "Schedule," "Timeline," "Video," "In His Own Words," and "Gallery." The "Timeline" offers a brief overview of important events in Lincoln's life.
  • The Lincoln Institute: concentrates on providing support and assistance in the study of the life of American's 16th President and the impact he had on the preservation of the Union, the emancipation of black slaves, and the development of democratic principles which have found worldwide application. This site is a must on the life and politics of this man who is 'remembered for his character, his speeches and letters, a man of humble origins whose determination and perseverance led him to the nation's highest office.'
  • With Malice Toward None: The Abraham Lincoln Bicentennial Exhibition (LOC). In commemoration of the two-hundredth anniversary of the birth of the nation’s revered sixteenth president, this exhibition reveals Lincoln the man, whose thoughts, words, and actions were deeply affected by personal experiences and pivotal historic events.

Languages:               Index

  • American Sign Language University: designed for students, teachers, parents, and visitors with an online sign language dictionary (complete with demonstration photographs), finger spelling lessons, and numbers lessons. The section for teachers is a real gem, as it includes a number of sample syllabi, general guidelines for instructors, as well as an online library that includes subjects such as regional dialects in ASL, Chinese Sign Language and the National Theater of the Deaf. Finally, the site contains a special section for parents. Here, they can learn more about communicating effectively with their child who is deaf.
  • BBC - Languages: Discover the Steps courses in Spanish, French, German and Italian. Shorter Courses in Portuguese, Greek and Chinese.
  • Foreign Languages (Lesson Corner.com): lesson plans and worksheets
  • Google Translate: free online language translation service instantly translates text and web pages. This translator supports: Afrikaans, Albanian, Arabic, Belarusian, Bulgarian, Catalan, Chinese, Croatian, Czech, Danish, Dutch, English, Estonian, Filipino, Finnish, French, Galician, German, Greek, Haitian Creole, Hebrew, Hindi, Hungarian, Icelandic, Indonesian, Irish, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Latvian, Lithuanian, Macedonian, Malay, Maltese, Norwegian, Persian, Polish, Portuguese, Romanian, Russian, Serbian, Slovak, Slovenian, Spanish, Swahili, Swedish, Thai, Turkish, Ukrainian, Vietnamese, Welsh, Yiddish, more being added.
  • Language Guide: A collaborative project to develop interactive, sound-integrated language learning resources. Provides interactive language lessons, quizzes, and texts that allow the language learner to hear the word or text pronounced by fluent, often native, speakers.
  • National Capital Language Resource Center (U.S. Department of Education, et al): excellent resource for language teachers at all levels…First-time visitors may wish to start by looking at some of their specialized sites, such as "The Essentials of Language Teaching", which is a "how-to" guide for university-level languages teachers. After that, they may want to look at "The Culture Club" area, which serves as a place where teachers and students can share multicultural and multi-language resources.
  • Spanish Tutorials (StudySpanish.com): Covers Spanish Pronunciation | Spanish Grammar | Spanish Vocabulary | Spanish Verbs | Travel Helper | Directory of Spanish Schools | Daily Word | Cultural Notes | Idioms.

Leadership Studies:               Index

       Character & Virtue:               Index

Legal Studies, Law & Justice:               Index

  • Canon Law Info: Created by Dr. Edward Peters, an American lay canon lawyer, as a resource center on Catholic Canon Law. "The more Catholics at all levels in the Church understand their canonical rights and duties, the more effectively they can partake in the mission of the Church, a mission born from and leading to communion with God and his faithful people."
  • Digital Media Law Project's Legal Guide Knowing your legal rights and responsibilities is important for anyone who publishes online. The DMLP's legal guide addresses the legal issues you may encounter as you gather information and publish your work. The guide is intended for use by citizen media creators with or without formal legal training, as well as others with an interest in these issues.
  • Duke Law & Technology Review: online legal publication that focuses on the evolving intersection of law and technology. This area of study draws on a number of legal specialties: cybercrime, intellectual property, patents & copyright, business law, media & communications, health & biotechnology & criminal law.
  • EDGAR Corporate Filings - U.S. and Otherwise (U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission): Public corporations (domestic and foreign) and certain "insiders" are required by law to file certain documents on a regular basis. This information, of course, is scrutinized by investors, financial analysts, journalists, etc. A good basic tutorial is available on the SEC website. It was updated earlier this year.
  • Family Law Center (FindLaw's): This section contains 5 topics, each containing helpful articles and resources - Adoption: Types, Laws, Child Custody: Types, Who Gets Custody?, Child Support: Receiving, Paying, Divorce: Property, Alimony, Laws, Marriage & Living Together: Prenuptials, Laws.
  • Federal Habeas Corpus - A Brief Legal Overview (Congressional Research Service).
  • Federal Judicial Center: Clearinghouse of information about the federal court system, its history, and its judges. Visitors can go straight to one of the primary sections—“Federal Judicial History”, “Publications & Videos”, and “Educational Programs & Materials”. In the “Publications & Videos” area, visitors can use the search engine to look for specific items of interest, or they can also browse the archive’s contents by subject or by date of publication. Type “copyright” in the search box for the Copyright Law, Second Edition, Robert A. Gorman, 2006. For most visitors, the “Federal Judicial History” will be of greatest interest, as it contains biographies of federal judges since 1789, the histories of individual courts, and summaries of landmark decisions.
  • FERPA - the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act: This federal law protects the privacy of your education records. The law applies to all schools that receive funds under an applicable program of the U.S. Department of Education. After age 18, you have certain rights under FERPA (until you are 18, your parents have these same rights, on your behalf). You have the right to review your records at the school, and request that the school correct any errors in those records. You also have the right to a hearing, if your school disagrees with you. With a few exceptions, the school cannot release your education records to other parties without your written consent. The exceptions include law enforcement, emergencies, transfer schools, officials at your school with a legitimate educational interest, and a few others.
  • FreeAdvice: free legal advice in 100+ law topics and insurance advice. Includes: Accident Law, Business Law, Bankruptcy Law, Criminal Law, Family Law, Intellectual Property, and more.
  • Glossary of Legal Terms (US Courts) a legal dictionary that explains the meaning of all words frequently used in civil, criminal and commercial law.
  • Hazing - Education Law (LawHigherEducation.com). Published: January 5, 2011.
  • The International Center for Not-for-Profit Law: primarily concerned with helping establish a legal framework for strengthening civil society across the globe. The "Tools and Publications" area will be quite helpful to practitioners in this area as it includes assessment tools (such as a bibliography on the nonprofit sector and civil society) and a number of guidelines for laws affecting civic organizations.
  • Justia: Law & legal information for lawyers, students, business and the public. Covers Legal Practice Areas | Legal Research & Law Practice | Cases in the News - Documents.
  • LawInfo's Free Legal Resource Center: Information you need to better understand the law and get answers to legal questions. From free legal forms and informational videos, to thousands of frequently asked questions, articles and guides, here’s the answers you've been searching for.
  • Law Library of Congress: provides research and legal information to the U.S. Congress as well as to U.S. Federal Courts and Executive Agencies, and to offer reference services to the public…To accomplish this mission, it has created the world's largest collection of law books and other legal resources from all countries, and now moves into the age of digitized information with online databases and guides to legal information worldwide.
    • Federal Statutes: A Beginner’s Guide (Law Library of Congress). "We will try to de-mystify federal statutory research by explaining the statutory publication process and describing where each type of statutory publication can be found."
  • Legal Information Institute - Cornell Law School: all opinions of the United States Supreme Court handed down since 1992, together with over 600 earlier decisions selected for their historic importance, over a decade of opinions of the New York Court of Appeals, and the full United States Code.
    • Introduction to Basic Legal Citation - The online version of the standard reference work on legal citation appeared in May by the Legal Information Institute (LII) at Cornell University's Law School.
  • Ohio Revised Code: All statutes of a permanent and general nature of the state as revised and consolidated into general provisions, titles, chapters, and sections including all bills passed with an effective date through September 12, 2008.
  • Open Jurist: access published court opinions without charge. Currently has over 600,000 opinions from the United States Supreme Court and United States Courts of Appeals from the First, Second and Third series of The Federal Reports.
  • The Oyez Project - U.S. Supreme Court: a multimedia archive devoted to the Supreme Court of the United States and its work. It aims to be a complete and authoritative source for all audio recorded in the Court since the installation of a recording system in October 1955. The Project also provides authoritative information on all justices and offers a virtual reality 'tour' of portions of the Supreme Court building, including the chambers of some of the justices.
  • Privacy Library (Morrison Foerster): the most comprehensive collection of privacy laws and regulations ever assembled, the result of years of research and experience working with clients around the world. The website provides companies with an essential tool to help them navigate the privacy labyrinth.
  • Social Media Law Student: "to connect lawyers with new technologies in hopes of making the practice of law easier.
  • The United States Code: a consolidation and codification by subject matter of the general and permanent laws of the United States, is now available in a searchable online format. It is prepared by the Office of the Law Revision Counsel of the United States House of Representatives.
  • Womens Law: a project of the National Network to End Domestic Violence (NNEDV): providing legal information and support to victims of domestic violence and sexual assault. Resources on Staying Safe, Knowing State & Federal Laws/Statutes, Preparing for Court, Learn about Abuse, Where to Find Help, Helping Others.

       Copyright, Fair Use and Intellectual Property:               Index

  • 3 Popular Image Licenses You Need To Be Familiar With Before Using Someone's PhotosCreative Commons | GNU Public License | Public Domain. You can't just use any image you find online on your blog…because most of the photos on the Internet are subject to copyright, meaning the photographer who took the photo has the exclusive legal right to use the image.
  • ALA Copyright 101 Educational Materials: Includes electronic and media reserves, international copyright law, fair use, interlibrary loan, and more!
  • Center for Copyright Information: Online copyright infringement (also called online piracy) has become a serious and growing problem. The Center for Copyright Information (CCI) was formed to educate consumers about the importance of copyright protection and to offer information about online copyright infringement. Our goal is to alleviate confusion and help Internet users find legal ways to enjoy the digital content they love.
  • Center for Internet and Society (CIS): a public interest technology law and policy program at Stanford Law School and a part of Law, Science and Technology Program at Stanford Law School. CIS studies the interaction of new technologies and the law and to examine how the synergy between the two can either promote or harm public goods like free speech, innovation, privacy, public commons, diversity, and scientific inquiry.
  • Copyright Clearance Center: By offering licenses and permissions to content from the world's most sought-after publications CCC helps to advance education, innovation and the free flow of information - all while encouraging respect for intellectual property and the principles of copyright.
    • Campus Guide to Copyright Compliance: Designed for academic institutions, this guide helps answer questions ranging from basic copyright law to the more complex topics of ILL and e-reserves. Includes an Introduction overview, Copyright Basics, Using Content, Copyright Compliance, Other Campus Copyright Issues and Quick Links.
    • Copyright Basics Video: educates about the ins and outs of copyright law
    • OnCopyright Education: Hub for information and tools to educate yourself and others about copyright issues around the world.
  • Copyright Basics © - What Is Copyright?: Copyright is a form of protection provided by the laws of the United States (title 17, U.S. Code) to the authors of "original works of authorship," including literary, dramatic, musical, artistic, and certain other intellectual works. This protection is available to both published and unpublished works.
  • Copyright.gov: Search Copyright Records, How to Register a Work, How to Record a Document, Law & Policy.
  • Copyright Law "Fair Use" - U.S. Copyright Office commentary (§107—§118 of the copyright act): The distinction between "fair use" and infringement may be unclear and not easily defined. There is no specific number of words, lines, or notes that may safely be taken without permission. Acknowledging the source of the copyrighted material does not substitute for obtaining permission. The safest course is always to get permission from the copyright owner before using copyrighted material. The Copyright Office cannot give this permission. When it is impracticable to obtain permission, use of copyrighted material should be avoided unless the doctrine of "fair use" would clearly apply to the situation. The Copyright Office can neither determine if a certain use may be considered "fair" nor advise on possible copyright violations. If there is any doubt, it is advisable to consult an attorney.
    • §107. Limitations on exclusive rights: Fair use
    • Code of Best Practices in Fair Use for Academic and Research Libraries – The Association of Research Libraries: "The Code provides librarians with powerful tools to work through copyright challenges in a way that is within the law and that gives due weight to their own values and the considered opinions of their peers in the library community."
    • "The Code of Best Practices in Fair Use for Scholarly Research in Communication": Produced by the International Communication Association, Center for Social Media, and the Program on Information Justice and Intellectual Property at American's law school. Download a PDF copy of the code.
    • Copyright: "Deciding What Information Is Fair to Use" by Reid Goldsborough. One of the catchphrases on the internet is "Information wants to be free." This creates the impression that anything you come across online is free for the using. Not quite. The same laws that protect intellectual property elsewhere can get you in trouble for appropriating someone else’s words, images, music, video, and so on.
    • "Fair Use Challenges in Academic and Research Libraries" - Association of Research Libraries (ARL: Report that summarizes research into the current application of fair use and other copyright exemptions to meet the missions of U.S. academic and research libraries.
    • Fair Use Frequently Asked Questions: Center for Social Media (American University's School of Communication)
    • Copyright Law’s Fair Use Quiz: The MIT Libraries’ Office of Scholarly Publishing, Copyright, and Licensing has launched an online Fair Use Quiz to help students better understand the core concepts of copyright law’s "fair use" provision, the flexible – but notably ambiguous – exception under US copyright law that makes it possible to use others’ copyrighted works without permission. The aim of the quiz is to put information about fair use in the hands of students and empower them to make informed decisions about using copyrighted works. Fair Use Quiz.
    • A Fair(y) Use Tale by Professor Eric Faden of Bucknell, a humorous, yet informative, review of copyright principles delivered through the words of the very folks we can thank for nearly endless copyright terms.
  • Copyright Information and Resources - Basics (University of Minnesota Libraries -- Copyright Initiatives)
    • Thinking Through Fair Use (University of Minnesota Libraries -- Copyright Initiatives). Fair Use allows users of copyrighted works to exercise some rights under certain circumstances without seeking permission or paying royalties. The Fair Use Doctrine is probably the most important exemption to copyright protections for educational settings, allowing many uses of copyrighted works for the purposes of teaching and research.
  • Copyright and Licensing Digital Materials - A Resource Guide: The digitization of life in our world is creating more and more questions in the world of copyright and licensing. The following information is meant to give you a brief overview of some of the many issues you may encounter. Additionally, it is meant to provide you with some reliable resources to use in your quest to obtain appropriate permissions for the use of copyrighted works.
  • Copyright for Librarians: a joint project of Harvard's Berkman Center for Internet and Society and Electronic Information for Libraries (eIFL). The goal of the project is…to inform librarians concerning: copyright law in general, the aspects of copyright law that most affect libraries, how librarians in the future could most effectively participate in the processes by which copyright law is interpreted and shaped.
  • Copyright - World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO): is responsible for administering 23 international treaties that deal with various aspects of intellectual property protection. For those who may be less familiar with the nuances of this complex field, the "About IP" area is a good place to start.
  • An Empirical Study of U.S. Copyright Fair Use Opinions, 1978-2005 (University of Pennsylvania Law Review, Jan., 2008). Section 107 of the Copyright Act of 1976 establishes the affirmative defense to copyright infringement of "fair use," by far the most enigmatic doctrine in U.S. copyright law and by far the most important.
  • Finding Public Domain & Creative Commons Media: (Harvard Law School Library). This guide will help you find and correctly attribute public domain and Creative Commons images or videos for your project or presentation.
  • Finding Copyrights and Trademarks for Free. The ever-more competitive business world makes protecting a company's intellectual property a key component to its success. Trademark-related research might concern clearing the name of a new business, product or service for use in commerce. It might involve monitoring new trademark applications, business filings and domain name registrations for potential infringements. Originally published in The CyberSkeptic's Guide to Internet Research (June 2005).
  • Innovative Copyright - Unique Resources for Copyright Education. The Copyright Education and Consultation Program, a project funded by the Illinois State Library…The goals of the program include increasing confidence in use of materials, informing users of copyright education resources available to them, empowering users with knowledge about their own intellectual property rights, and facilitating use of copyrighted material in the classroom.
  • Research Copyright: Learn all about copyrights, patents, trademarks, and intellectual property. Learn how to copyright your own works, whether you are a writer, artist, musician, filmmaker, or other creative person. Learn about copyright infringement and how to search for copyrights to obey U.S. Copyright Laws. Download our free guides on copyright law, copyright search, and how to use copyright protection.
  • Section 108 Study Group - Independent Copyright Committee: Launched by The Library of Congress to conduct a reexamination of the exceptions and limitations applicable to libraries and archives under the Copyright Act, specifically in light of the changes wrought by digital media. The group will study how Section 108 of the Copyright Act may need to be amended to address the relevant issues and concerns of libraries and archives, as well as creators and other copyright holders.
  • Teaching Copyright Curriculum: Created to help teachers present the laws surrounding digital rights in a balanced way. Teaching Copyright provides lessons and ideas for opening your classroom up to discussion, letting your students express their ideas and concerns, and then guiding your students toward an understanding of the boundaries of copyright law.

Libraries, Museums and On-line Archives:               Index

  • LIFE Photo Archive: Search millions of photographs from the LIFE photo archive, stretching from the 1750s to today. Most were never published and are now available for the first time through the joint work of LIFE and Google.
  • American Museum of Natural History: On Exhibit
  • Ancient Greece - The British Museum: Explore the world of ancient Greece using hundreds of objects from the British Museum.
  • Ancient Observatories: Chichen Itza. This exhibition, developed by the Exploratorium Museum, gives an overview of Mayan History, Mayan Mythology and a Map of the excavation. Be sure to visit the Alignments, the background on the intricacies of how the Mayans aligned their structures for best observing the heavens. This site portrays an advanced ancient civilization and is a testament to the ingenuity of these peoples. Don't miss the Activities, a Mayan Calendar and Mayan Math where you can lean to count in Mayan using the ancient stone documents
  • Artcyclopedia: compiled a comprehensive index of every artist represented at hundreds of museum sites, image archives, and other online resources.
  • Awesome Library: organizes the Web with 31,000 carefully reviewed resources, including the top 5 percent in education. Topic areas: The Arts, English, Mathematics, Science, Social Studies, Health and PE, Technology, Languages. Includes sections for Teachers, Kids, Teens, Parents, Librarians, and College Students.
  • The Bibliotheca Alexandrina: aims to be a center of excellence in the production and dissemination of knowledge and to be a place of dialogue, learning and understanding between cultures and peoples.
  • Boston University Libraries: Research Guides listed by Subjects.
  • British Library - Online Gallery You can now view and hear a staggering 30,000 images and sounds from our world-renowned collections without ever needing to visit the prestigious building in London.
  • Etext Projects ( University of Virginia Library’s Electronic Text Center): holdings include approximately 70,000 on- and off-line humanities texts in many languages (including online Chinese and Japanese literature) and hundreds of thousands of related images.
  • Exploratorium: the museum of science, art and human perception.
  • Google Art Project: Google has collaborated with 17 art museums around the world to produce a cool site that lets you navigate through high resolution images of the artworks in these museums.
  • The Greatest Films: interpretive, descriptive reviews and historical background on classic American films. A wealth of film reference material (including a complete Academy Awards History and Film History) is featured as well as hundreds of colorful, vintage poster reproductions for some of the best Hollywood and American classic films in the last century. This site is an outstanding, all-around resource with reviews of classic American films, historical and genre information.
  • Great Web Sites for Kids: The Association for Library Service to Children (ALSC), a division of the American Library Association. ALSC’s online resource containing hundreds of links to commendable Web sites for children.
    • KidsClick: Web Search for Kids by Librarians. Terrific site to help your children prepare term papers and research projects.
  • Halta Definizione: Every art historian's dream has come true. The Italian masterpieces from the Middle Ages to the Modern Era viewable online at a stunning resolution.
  • Hathi Trust Digital Library: a partnership of major research institutions and libraries working to ensure that the cultural record is preserved and accessible long into the future. There are more than fifty partners in HathiTrust, and membership is open to institutions worldwide.
  • ipl2: information you can trust. Merging the resources from the Internet Public Library (IPL) and the Librarians' Internet Index (LII) websites. The site is hosted by The College of Computing & Informatics at Drexel University, and a consortium of colleges and universities.
    • ipl2 - Resources by Subject: merger of the Internet Public Library (IPL) and the Librarians' Internet Index (LII). An annotated collection of high quality Internet resources, selected by ipl2 staff for their usefulness in providing accurate, factual information on a particular topic or topics.
      • ipl2 - Pathfinders: "IPL Expert Guides" intended to help you get started doing research on a particular topic, both online and at your local library. Covers Arts/Humanities, Business/Consumers, Education/Libraries, Entertainment/Leisure/Hobbies, General Reference, Health/Medicine/Nutrition, History/War, Law/Politics/Government, Science/Technology, Society/Culture.
      • ipl2 - Homeschooling: educating children at home with educational materials and content chosen by parents. In the United States, homeschooling is a legal option for parents who wish to educate their children in a different learning environment than what exists within the schools of the community. Different states in the U.S. have different legal requirements if children are to be homeschooled.
  • The Jewish Virtual Library: the most comprehensive online Jewish encyclopedia in the world, covering everything from anti-Semitism to Zionism. So far, more than 10,000 articles and 5,000 photographs and maps have been integrated into the site. The Library has 13 wings: History, Women, The Holocaust, Travel, Israel & The States, Maps, Politics, Biography, Israel, Religion, Judaic Treasures of the Library of Congress, Vital Statistics and Reference.
    • Judaism Primer (InfoPlease): Holidays, history, beliefs, culture, and more.
  • The Library of Congress (LOC): the nation's oldest federal cultural institution and serves as the research arm of Congress. It is also the largest library in the world, with millions of books, recordings, photographs, maps and manuscripts in its collections.
    • Ask a Librarian: an online reference service from the Library of Congress (LOC)
    • Law Library of Congress: provides research and legal information to the U.S. Congress as well as to U.S. Federal Courts and Executive Agencies, and to offer reference services to the public…To accomplish this mission, it has created the world's largest collection of law books and other legal resources from all countries, and now moves into the age of digitized information with online databases and guides to legal information worldwide.
    • Virtual Reference Shelf: selected web resources compiled by the Library of Congress (LOC)
    • The American Folklife Center: Library of Congress (LOC)
  • Library Spot: a free virtual library resource center for educators and students, librarians, families, businesses and just about anyone exploring the Web for valuable research information.
  • The Marian Library/International Marian Research Institute (University of Dayton): an international center of study and research on Mary, the Mother of Jesus Christ. The Marian Library holds the world's largest collection of printed materials on the Blessed Virgin.
  • Medieval and Early Modern Manuscripts Collection: Database and Digital Images at the Harry Ransom Center University of Texas-Austin. This database contains 215 medieval or Renaissance manuscripts that date between the 11th and 17th centuries.
  • The Metropolitan Museum of Art (MOMA): over 400,000 images available for free download for non-commercial use as a part of its Open Access for Scholarly Content initiative.
  • Museum of Online Museums (MoOM): links to online collections and exhibits covering a vast array of interests and obsessions. The MoOM is organized into three sections: The Museum Campus contains links to brick-and-mortar museums with an interesting online presence. The Permanent Collection displays links to exhibits of particular interest to design and advertising. Galleries, Exhibition, and Shows is an eclectic and ever-changing list of interesting links to collections and galleries, most of them hosted on personal web pages. In other words, it's where all the good stuff is.
  • National Archives (NARA) has preserved and provided access to the records of the United States of America. Keeper of the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution, and the Bill of Rights and many other public records.
  • The National Gallery of Art - Collections: one of the finest collections in the world illustrating major achievements in painting, sculpture and graphic arts from the Middle Arts to the present. The collections can be searched by specific artist, title, or a combination of criteria for easy access to all the individual works.
  • Natural History Museum - UK: a world-class resource to assist learners enjoy the natural world, develop their scientific knowledge and understand the impact of science on their lives. Explore Nature videos, news, science of natural history, collections/exhibitions, teachers' resources, educational activities.
  • National Library Service for the Blind and Physically Handicapped (LOC): Administers the free program that loans recorded and braille books and magazines, music scores in braille and large print, and specially designed playback equipment to residents of the United States who are unable to read or use standard print materials because of visual or physical impairment. Materials circulated to eligible borrowers in the United States by postage-free mail.
  • Norman Rockwell Museum Digital Collections: Original artworks, archival objects available for private study, scholarship, research, and public enjoyment. This image and data library is a multimedia tool that enables keyword and advanced searches of the Museum's extensive digital collections.
  • OhioLink Digital Resource Commons (DRC):  learn about the historic, instructional, cultural, and creative works of those in the Ohio University system, as well as the liberal arts colleges of Ohio. Visitors will want to click on "Communities and Collections" on the left hand menu to browse the vast resources available. Some of the communities included are "Art and Architecture", "Multi-Subject Video", and "OhioLINK Electronic Thesis and Dissertation Center".
  • The National Security Archive: independent non-governmental research institute and library located at The George Washington University in Washington, D.C. The Archive collects and publishes declassified documents acquired through the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA).
  • The PBS Digital Learning Library: a public media system-wide repository of digital media learning objects, including videos, images, interactives, audios and documents.
  • Pew Research Religion & Public Life Project: seeks to promote a deeper understanding of issues at the intersection of religion and public affairs. The Forum pursues its mission by delivering timely, impartial information to national opinion leaders, including government officials and journalists. As a nonpartisan, non-advocacy organization, the Forum does not take positions on policy debates.
  • Project Gutenberg Online Book Catalog: There are over 20,000 free books in the catalog. Bookshelf categories: Children's Bookshelf | Countries Bookshelf | Crime Bookshelf | Periodicals Bookshelf | Religion Bookshelf | Science Bookshelf | Wars Bookshelf . Browse by Author, Title, Language or Recently Posted
  • The September 11 Digital Archive: to collect, preserve, and present the history of September 11, 2001 and its aftermath. The Archive contains more than 150,000 digital items, a tally that includes more than 40,000 emails and other electronic communications, more than 40,000 first-hand stories, and more than 15,000 digital images. In September 2003, the Library of Congress accepted the Archive into its collections, an event that both ensured the Archive's long-term preservation and marked the library's first major digital acquisition.
  • The Socjournal: A new media journal of sociology and society.
    • Writing Tips for being a better writer are designed to help sociologists and social science students learn to communicate their insight, wisdom, and knowledge in a more direct, lucid, and intelligible way.
    • The Electronic Journal of Sociology: "the world’s first and longest running electronic journal of sociology."
  • The Smithsonian Institution: the world's largest museum complex and research organization composed of 19 museums, 9 research centers, and the National Zoo.
  • The Speculum Romanae Magnifcientiae Digital Collection (University of Chicago Library): collection of 994 engravings which depict major monuments of Rome and Roman antiquities by Antonio Lafreri, a master printmaker and publisher in 16th century Italy. Visitors should click on the "Itineraries" to find mini-exhibitions designed by scholars that will allow them to travel through the collection based on a theme, location, collection, or artist.
  • The State Hermitage Museum, St. Petersburg, Russia - the Digital Collection: the new virtual gallery of high-resolution artwork images from the State Hermitage Museum.
  • Theology Library (compiled by Gerald Darring). The Library is Catholic but in an ecumenical way, respecting the contributions of other Christian denominations. It takes a dialogical approach rather than a confrontational one, downplaying apologetics and encouraging inter-religious dialogue.
  • Congress - Library of Congress: to make Federal legislative information freely available to the Internet public.
  • The World Digital Library (WDL): Promotes international and intercultural understanding in multilingual format with significant primary materials from countries and cultures around the world.
  • Your Paintings – BBC: aims to show the entire UK national collection of oil paintings, the stories behind the paintings, and where to see them for real. It is made up of paintings from thousands of museums and other public institutions around the country.

Mathematics:               Index

  • Algebasics: online mathematics instructional resource that takes young and old alike through the basics of algebra. The breadth of the material is divided into sixteen sections, which begin with, well, "the basics", and proceed all the way to a section on applying algebra to real-world situations.
    • Algebra Help: a collection of lessons, calculators, and worksheets created to assist students and teachers of algebra.
    • Algebra Homework Help: Pre-algebra, Algebra I, Algebra II, Geometry, Physics. Archives contain hundreds of problems solved by the tutors.
    • College Algebra Virtual Math Lab (West Texas A&M): Series of online algebra tutorials for students and anyone else who might be returning to the world of algebra. First-time visitors should feel free to browse through any of the 59 tutorials offered here. Each tutorial contains information about learning objectives, full explanations, and numerous examples of how to correctly solve problems.
    • Get The Math – algebra in the real world. See how professionals use math in music, fashion, video games, restaurants, basketball, and special effects. Then take on interactive challenges related to those careers. Get the Math combines video and web interactivity to help middle and high school students develop algebraic thinking skills for solving real-world problems.
    • Purplemath: contains hundreds of lessons designed to help students who might be having trouble with algebra. "These lessons emphasize the practicalities rather than the technicalities, demonstrating dependable techniques, warning of likely "trick" questions, and pointing out common mistakes."
  • Applied Math and Science Education Repository (AMSER): a portal of educational resources free for anyone to use. AMSER is funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) as part of the National Science Digital Library, and is being created by a team of project partners led by Internet Scout.
  • Bates College Online Resources for Calculus and Linear Algebra: The first couple of resources in each section contain past quizzes and exams from each course, complete with information on each topic. Additionally, each area contains drill problems, tutorials, and a fun "Find the Error!" feature. The topics covered here include linear algebra, quadric surfaces, functions, and abstract vector spaces.
  • The Calculus Page (U.C. Davis): features dozens of links to valuable online resources that deal with this branch of mathematical inquiry and discovery. The first section of the site is dedicated to providing materials for students of calculus (including calculus animations and sample exams) and a number of resources for instructors follow.
    • AP Calculus AB Course Home Page (Educational Testing Service (ETS) & AP College Board): this site contains a cornucopia of materials about teaching and learning calculus. Note the "Classroom Instruction and Resources" section.
    • Instacalc Online Calculator a solution to those who need a variety of calculations and conversions done simultaneously. With Instacalc, just need to type in a calculation or operation and the answer will appear. The application also includes some programming tools and advanced math functionality, and the application can be embedded or linked, depending on the user's preference.
  • Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching - Statway: Focuses on providing educational resources on statistics, data analysis, and quantitative reasoning. The hope is that the Statway program will help students "understand the world around them and the math they can use right now."
  • Centre for Innovation in Mathematics Teaching (University of Plymouth, UK): developed instructional materials designed to help both novice and experienced math teachers. This particular area of their website provides access to a number of interactive mathematics tutorials. The materials are divided into eight units, including those that deal with factors, mathematical diagrams, proportion, and estimating; users will find coverage of everything from prime factors to the sometimes-daunting Pythagorean theorem.
  • CK-12.org: Free Customizable Teaching Resources for K-12 - specializing in mathematics, sciences, SAT prep.
  • Exercises in Math Readiness: instructional tools to refresh memories on various mathematical concepts. Created by the Department of Mathematics and Statistics at the University of Saskatchewan, the site contains exercises of varying difficulty that will take users through such topics as geometry, trigonometry, algebra, and exponential functions. Teachers will also want to look at the section that offers them some specific instructions on how the site might best be used with students.
  • Fibonacci Sequence - the Fingerprint of God: An amazing insight into the detailed architecture of Creation.
  • Figure This! (National Council of Teachers of Mathematics): Mathematical challenges for families provide interesting math challenges that middle-school students can do at home with their families.
  • Free Test Online: Standardized Tests Math and Science Practice for SAT, ACT, CLEP, Advanced Placement and GMAT standardized tests. Designed for students who are looking for free test practice and help and teachers who are searching for teaching resources.
  • FunBrain Kids Center - Numbers: fun site to help with the Numbers, from basic arithmetic to fractions, graphs and algebra. All games have varying degrees of difficulty beginning with Easy on through Super Brain so you can pick the level at which to start your child (yourself, even if you do not want to admit that fact).
  • Illuminations: Math Lessons (National Council of Teachers of Mathematics) presents a series of grade specific lessons on various topics of mathematics. There are 524 lesson plans to 'support teachers in ensuring mathematics learning of the highest quality for all students.' Illuminations provides 'standards-based resources that improve the teaching and learning of mathematics for all students.'
  • Innovative Teaching Exchange developed by The Mathematical Association of America in order to facilitate the exchange of interesting and compelling teaching resources from a wide range of educators. As their site indicates, "The intention is to encourage more experimentation with more methods than the traditional lecture/questions method."
  • InterMath: a professional development effort designed to support teachers in becoming better mathematics educators. It focuses on building teachers' mathematical content knowledge through mathematical investigations that are supported by technology. InterMath includes a workshop component and materials to support instructors.
  • Karen's Calculator: a high-precision calculator. Unlike ordinary calculators, it returns completely accurate results, even with operands containing thousands of digits. If you're patient, operands and results containing hundreds of thousands of digits are possible too!
    • MegaConverter2 convert just about anything from one unit to a different unit—angles, area, finance interest, fractions to decimals, kitchen measures, power, pressure, flowrate with lots of units in between. Also, includes a MegaCalculator.
    • Unit Converter Express Version: ultimate resource for unit conversion of length, weight/mass, currency, temperature, engineering units, electricity, and many more.
    • Web2.0calc: a fantastic scientific-based calculator that is available only on the web. It's simple to use, easy to understand, and functions like nobody's business.
  • The Khan Academy: Includes over 2100 videos covering everything from basic arithmetic and algebra to differential equations, Singapore Math, physics, finance and money and banking. Khan has also developed a free, adaptive math program.
    • Math TV - Math and Algebra Help: tutorial videos on topics that range from basic math to Calculus. Videos are broken into short but very useful lessons that vary between 5 and 10 minutes in length and are very clear.
  • Learning Math: Data Analysis, Statistics, and Probability (Annenberg Media group). Provides teachers with materials to teach data analysis, statistics, and probability. The materials here are organized around the content standards of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM). The focus is on introducing these concepts as an integrated problem-solving process.
    • Statlect:  free digital textbook on probability theory and mathematical statistics
  • Lesson Plans for Math: Lesson Corner.com: Includes lesson plans and worksheets.
  • Math.com - World of Math Online: Free math lessons and math homework help — basic math, everyday math, pre-algebra, algebra, geometry, trigonometry, statistics, calculus and beyond.
  • Math Central: an Internet service for mathematics teachers and students K-12. A meeting place for teachers to share resources, a service to teachers, students and parents who may need an answer to a mathematical question.
  • MATHCOUNTS®:  national math enrichment, coaching and competition program that promotes middle school mathematics achievement through grassroots involvement in every U.S. state and territory. With over 22 years experience, MATHCOUNTS is one of the most successful education partnerships involving volunteers, educators, industry sponsors, and students.
  • The Math Forum @ Drexel: leading online resource for improving math learning, math education, and communication. Offers a wealth of problems and puzzles; online mentoring; research; team problem solving; collaborations; and professional development.
  • Math Goodies: complete math lessons that cover these topics: Perimeter & Area of Polygons, Circumference & Area of Circles, Number Theory, Understanding Percent, Percent Applications, Integers, Probability/Statistics, Pre-Algebra, Symbolic Logic, Data and Graphs.
  • Math Is Fun - K-12 math concepts: Features include numbers, geometry, algebra, "Systems of Measurement"- Metric & US Standard, understanding money & compound interest; plus worksheets & an illustrated math dictionary.
  • MathTV instructors demonstrate the power of online video for solving math problems in basic math, algebra, geometry, trigonometry, and calculus.
  • Math Worksheets World: over 12,000 K-12 math worksheets, lesson, math worksheet makers, homework, and quizzes.
    • Math Worksheets Center: over 8,000 K-12 math worksheets, lesson, homework, and quizzes. Created by a group of Math Teachers assigned the task of helping a struggling school district evaluate and choose a math curriculum that would help their students achieve success.
    • Math Worksheet Site: On-line Math Worksheet Generator. You can create an endless supply of printable math worksheets. The intuitive interface gives you the ability to easily customize each worksheet to target your student's specific needs. Every worksheet is created when you request it, so they are different every time.
    • Math Worksheets: for Teachers, Parents, Students, and Homeschoolers. Randomly and dynamically generated math worksheets covering Addition, Division, Exponents, Factors, Fractions, Graphing, Mean Mode Median & Range, Measurement, Money, Multiplication, Pythagorean Theorem, Radicals, Ratios, Rounding, Subtraction, Telling Time, and Word Games, and more.
    • Math Worksheets Land: Over 6,000 Printable Math Worksheets for all grade levels. The largest and most comprehensive K-12 math worksheets site aligned directly to the core curriculum.
  • Mathematical Association of America (MAA): provides a range of high-quality educational resources for educators all across the United States and the world.
    • Math Sciences Digital Library: online resource published by the Mathematical Association of America. The site provides online resources for both teachers and students of mathematics.
  • Mathematics Classroom Resources (National Science Foundation): collection of lessons and web resources aimed at classroom teachers, their students, and students' families.
  • Mathematics Illuminated: an excellent thirteen-part series created by Annenberg Media for adult learners and high school teachers. The series "explores major themes in the field of mathematics, from humankind's earliest study of prime numbers, to the cutting-edge mathematics used to reveal the shape of the universe."
    • Math in Daily Life (Annenberg Media):  interactive exercises of mathematical principles in areas of life such as home decorating, finances, and of course, cooking. The site includes a list of relevant websites, including links to The Math Forum, the U.S. Census Bureau, and The Metric Conversion Card.
  • Mathematics – MIT OpenCourseWare: There are over four dozen courses here, complete with syllabi, lecture notes, and even in some cases video lectures and other audio visual materials.
  • National Council of Teachers of Mathematics: a public voice of mathematics education, providing vision, leadership and professional development to support teachers in ensuring equitable mathematics learning of the highest quality for all students.
    • Lessons and Resources (NCTM): Elementary, Middle School and High School, Help for Families.
    • Tips for Teachers (NCTM): Testing, Grading, Homework, Communicating with Parents, Tools and Technology.
  • National Library of Virtual Manipulatives: Interactive online learning units that deal with topics such as geometry, arithmetic, and trigonometry. The "About" section includes a tutorial designed for educators who wish to use the materials as well as another tutorial that will teach educators how to create lessons and activities. Visitors can also browse teacher published lessons, all of which have been vetted by staff members at the National Library. Finally, visitors will want to definitely look over the virtual manipulatives library, which includes instructional materials that students will find quite engaging.
  • Online Mathematics Textbooks freely available on the web.
  • Online Statistics Education: An Interactive Multimedia Course of Study. Provides everything a big, fat, hard-covered stats book does but it in an easily navigable web format.
  • Open Curriculum Mathematics Library: a 5,000-document library for math teachers to use as lesson materials tailored to the lesson plans for the Common Core mathematics. Anyone can use the material on the website without logging in, but to get access to tools such as the lesson plan builder, you need to create a free account.
  • Plus, the Best Science Site on the Web: opens a window to the world of math by providing articles from the top mathematicians and science writers on topics as diverse as art, medicine, cosmology and sport.
  • PUMAS -  Practical Uses of Math and Science (NASA): On-Line Journal of Math and Science Examples for Pre-College Education. A collection of brief examples showing how math and science topics taught in K-12 classes can be used in interesting settings, including every day life.
  • Quizzes.cc: provides math quizzes, great for teachers and students. You can choose some of the popular quizzes or design your own math quiz.
  • S.O.S. MATHematics: resource for math review material for high school, college students and adult learners. Get help to do your homework, refresh your memory, prepare for a test,…Browse more than 2,500 Math pages filled with short and easy-to-understand explanations on the following subject areas: Algebra, Trigonometry, Calculus, Differential Equations, Complex Variables, Matrix Algebra, or Mathematical Tables.
  • Success in Mathematics (St. Louis University): Tips on how to study mathematics, how to approach problem-solving, how to study for and take tests, and when and how to get help.
  • Teachnet.Com: offers multiple resources for teachers, including lesson plan ideas in mathematics, science, technology and many other subject areas.
  • Teaching Quantitative Skills in the Geosciences Helping students master skills ranging from simple arithmetic or graphing, to sophisticated use of equations and models is an integral aspect of teaching geoscience at the undergraduate level.
  • Wolfram MathWorld: The Web's Most Extensive Mathematics Resource.

Philosophy and Ethics:               Index

       Bioethics & Healthcare Ethics:               Index

  • The Anscombe Bioethics Centre: a Roman Catholic academic institute that engages with the moral questions arising in clinical practice and biomedical research.
  • The Bioethics Research Library - Georgetown University: World’s largest collection related to an interdisciplinary and multi-format collection on ethical issues related to health care, biomedical research, biotechnology, and the environment.
    • Genetics and Ethics: Ethical issues surrounding genetics continue to be a focus of the Bioethics Research Library.
  • Center for Bioethics (University of Minnesota): "to advance and disseminate knowledge concerning ethical issues in health care and the life sciences." Visitors will want to check out the "Resource Center" section. Here, they will find short summaries on a variety of bioethics topics, detailed overviews with thorough bibliographies, as well as an excellent set of resources for teachers who wish to incorporate bioethics into the classroom.
  • On Vaccines Made From Cells of Aborted Fetuses - "It is a Grave Responsibility to Use Alternative Vaccines". Vatican City, July 26, 2005 (Zenit.org) Letter by Bishop Elio Sgreccia, president of the Pontifical Academy for Life of a study conducted by the academy entitled "Moral Reflections on Vaccines Prepared from Cells Derived from Aborted Human Fetuses."

Psychology:               Index

  • AllPsych Online: The Virtual Psychology Classroom. Contains eight primary sections which cover everything from classic psychology studies to an extensive reference area.
  • Brain Facts: features nearly 1,000 accessible, scientifically reviewed resources about the brain and mind. Tabs feature About Neuroscience | Brain Basics | Sensing, Thinking & Behaving | Diseases & Disorders.
    • Brain Facts for Educators: Easy-to-use teaching resources, activities to engage young people’s interest, and educational tools sorted by age and reading level. Most resources in this section are aimed at pre-university students. Multimedia resources include videos and images to augment lesson plans.
  • Brain Works: This fun, interactive quiz will evaluate which hemisphere of your brain is dominant as well as whether you evaluate things more predominantly with visual or auditory cues. The right hemisphere of the brain is linked to creativity, while the left hemisphere of the brain is paired with analytical thinking. By knowing which hemisphere is dominant, we can determine the style of learning that will be most effective for us.
  • College Depression (Mayo Clinic): What Parents Need to Know.
  • Helpguide.org: Understand, Prevent and Resolve Life's Challenges. Expert information and non-commercial resources for mental and emotional health, active healthy lifestyles, and aging issues.
  • International Society for the Study of Trauma and Dissociation (ISSTD): Contains resource sections for Experienced Professionals, for Students, for the Public, and the Journal of Trauma & Dissociation.
  • The Mind: Teaching Modules (Annenberg Foundation - Colorado State University). 35 short video clips that cover current findings on language processing, drug treatment and addictions, and cognitive development throughout the life span. The programs also cover mood and personality disorders, and pain and its treatment.
  • "The Psychology of Cyberspace": John Suler, Ph.D., Department of Psychology, Rider University. This hypertext book explores the psychological aspects of environments created by computers and online networks. It presents an evolving conceptual framework for understanding how people react to and behave within cyberspace: what I call "the psychology of cyberspace" – or simply "cyberpsychology." Continually being revised and expanded, this hypertext book originally was created in January of 1996. See the article index which indicates the articles most recently added and revised.
  • Psychology Today - Psych Basics: Core concepts in the field of psychology.
  • The Road to Resilience (American Psychological Association): This APA brochure is intended to help readers with taking their own road to resilience. The information within describes resilience and some factors that affect how people deal with hardship. Much of the brochure focuses on developing and using a personal strategy for enhancing resilience.
  • Social Psychology Network: Searchable database of more than 11,000 annotated Web links related to psychology
  • Viktor Frankl - Why to Believe in Others (TED). In this rare clip from 1972, the legendary psychiatrist and Holocaust-survivor delivers a powerful message about the human search for meaning—and the most important gift we can give others.
  • William James: Includes Essays, Excerpts, Letters, and Reviews; Talks to Teachers on Psychology and to Students on Life's Ideals; The Principles of Psychology; Pragmatism: A New Name for Some Old Ways of Thinking; The Meaning of Truth; The Will to Believe; Essays in Radical Empiricism; On The Varieties of Religious Experience.

Reference Section:               Index

  • Skills and Strategies for Web Researching: Before the Internet was invented, academic research was largely restricted to library books, journals, or personal accounts.…We are fortunate today to have such tremendous resources at our fingertips, but it is important to know how to use it correctly.…The key is in knowing where to look for reliable resources, and weeding out good content from bad.
    • Internet Detective free online tutorial to develop Internet research skills for your university and college work. The tutorial looks at the critical thinking required when using the Internet for research and offers practical advice on evaluating the quality of web sites.
    • Internet MiniGuide Annotated Link Compilation: dedicated to the latest and most competent academic and scholar search engines and sources.
    • Research Guides at Harvard University Library: From African Studies to Zoology, each guide contains information culled from both print resources at Harvard's libraries to a plethora of digital resources from around the Internet. There are a number of particularly rich guides here, including those for Data and Biological Sciences.
  • American Bald Eagle Information: Eagle facts, myths, folklore, legends and more.
  • American FactFinder (U.S. Census Bureau): Your source for population, housing, economic, business, government and geographic data.
  • Ask a Librarian (Library of Congress)
  • 'Brought to Life' (Science Museum, London): Exploring the History of Medicine. Offers access to images of thousands of fascinating objects from the Museum’s great medical collections. A valuable resource for teachers and students working on the history of medicine, and related subjects, in schools and universities. It also engages people of all ages and interests in the story of medicine.
  • College & Research Libraries: official scholarly research journal of the Association of College & Research Libraries, a division of the American Library Association. Access C&RL Archive of all online issues.
  • Country Reports - Cultural, Historical, Statistical, Country Information: Offers extremely detailed information on every country in the world. Find national flags, anthems, traditions and even native foods and hobbies.
  • Daylight Saving Time: When we change our clocks -- Spring Forward, Fall Back. Includes Rationale & original idea | Incidents and anecdotes | Early adoption and U.S. law | Worldwide daylight saving.
  • DifferenceBetween: not only facilitates your understanding of a topic, but it also enables you to differentiate two similar subjects. The subjects are organized into a range of categories from "Business" to "Technology". We compile and unify multiple reliable resources for each topic onto a single page, so then readers can gather adequate information very quickly and effortlessly.'
  • FactCheck.org: Annenberg Public Policy Center of the University of Pennsylvania. A nonpartisan, nonprofit "consumer advocate" that aims to reduce the level of deception and confusion in U.S. politics. We monitor the factual accuracy of what is said by major U.S. political players in the form of TV ads, debates, speeches, interviews and news releases. Our goal is to apply the best practices of both journalism and scholarship, and to increase public knowledge and understanding.
  • Google – Search Education: It is critical that students understand how to effectively use web search to find quality sources appropriate to their task. Google created a series of lessons to help you guide your students to use search meaningfully in their academic research and beyond. The site is aimed at both at teachers and at individual users.
  • GRE Words - Short & Tricky (Dictionary.com): Test your familiarity with these deceptively short but tricky words as you prepare to take the GRE.
    • Magoosh GRE Blog: hundreds of GRE video lessons and practice questions covering math, verbal, vocabulary.
    • Magoosh GMAT Blog: hundreds of GMAT video lessons and practice questions covering math, and verbal.
    • Magoosh SAT Blog: hundreds of SAT practice questions and video explanations covering writing, grammar, reading comprehension, vocabulary words, and more.
    • The Ultimate Guide to Destroy GRE Reading Comprehension: 57 Tips, Strategies and Speed Reading Techniques to Ace the Most Difficult Section on the GRE.
    • Varsity Tutors Practice Tests: a comprehensive suite of completely free practice tests, flashcards, and questions of the day for standardized tests and academic subjects of all levels – ACT, AP, CLEP, GED, GMAT, LSAT, MCAT, SAT and other levels.
  • Greeting Card Message: Contains hundreds of links to all categories of greeting card messages, including anniversaries, "get well soon", and wedding invitations.
    • Best Card Messages: Categories include Mother’s Day, Birthday, and Baby Card messages. The site includes both traditional and funny messages that can be copied.
    • Buzzle.com: a huge database of birthday, romantic, motivational, inspirational, wise, and funny quotes, poems, and messages.
    • Planning Ahead: Readings and Funeral Poems. Here are the most loved poems, prose, religious texts, thoughts and readings for funerals.
    • Poemsource: Features poems of Christmas, Friendships, New Years, Birthdays, and other common categories.
    • Verses 4 Cards: Contains several dozen categories of poems, quotes, and sayings for all occasions. Also includes seasonal messages, thank you messages for teachers, funeral and sympathy poems…
  • History of the Holidays - History.com: Includes history, traditions, origins, recipes and videos for Black History Month, Chinese New Year, Christmas, Cinco de Mayo, Columbus Day, Earth Day, Easter, Fathers Day, Fourth of July, Halloween, Hanukkah, Kwanzaa, Labor Day, Memorial Day, Passover, Ramadan, Rosh Hashanah, St. Patrick’s Day, Thanksgiving, Valentine’s Day, Veterans Day, and more.
    • Holidays on the Net: a collection of multimedia holiday celebrations.…Each holiday celebration also offers a wealth of information about the holiday, including its history and holiday-related activities.
    • Holidays Calendar: Provides information on dates and information for holidays around the world, and to present it in a fun and accurate manner for children and adults of many ages.
  • INFOMINE: Scholarly Internet Resource Collections. A virtual library of Internet resources relevant to faculty, students, and research staff at the university level. It contains useful Internet resources such as databases, electronic journals, electronic books, bulletin boards, mailing lists, online library card catalogs, articles, directories of researchers, and many other types of information.
  • Interesting Fun Facts: As the name suggest, provides you with some interesting information on various topics. The site has been divided in categories ranging from the animal kingdom all the way up to geography. Listed within these categories, you will find articles that can prove to be a invaluable resource when it comes to gather information about topics like animals, insects, mountains, rivers and lots more.
  • Internet Public Library - Reference: includes basic research tools such as almanacs, dictionaries, encyclopedias, Calculation & Conversion Tools, Grammar, Style and Writing Guides.
  • Inside Higher Ed the online source for news, opinion and career advice and services for all of higher education. Plus, a powerful suite of tools to help higher education professionals get jobs and colleges identify and hire employees.
  • LearnersTV - Free Video Lecture Courses: Comprehensive site providing thousands of downloadable Video lectures, Live Online Tests, etc in the fields of Biology, Physics, Chemistry, Mathematics, Computer Science, Engineering, Medicine, Management and Accounting, Dentistry, Nursing, Psychology, History, Language Training, Literature, Law, Economics, Philosophy, Astronomy, Political Science, etc. Most of the materials offered are licensed by the respective institutes under a Creative Commons License.
  • Martindale's Reference Desk: a complete reference site that is updated daily with world affairs and other items of interest. The site has a comprehensive index that covers just about every subject from languages to construction, to science and physics as well as a variety of online calculators.
  • Mocomi - Learn: free educational lessons to kids with the perfect blend of fun and learning that helps the left & the right brained child learn through experiences. Choose from subject areas: English, General Knowledge, Geography, Maths, Biology, Chemistry, Physics, and the Environment.
  • Mobento: a video learning platform providing a free to use library of the world's best educational videos. They scour the public web and work with the world's best teachers and institutions to bring you a one stop shop for video learning. It's like a You Tube of education. Click Discover > All Categories for a drop-down menu.
  • NationMaster: a massive central data source and a handy way to graphically compare nations. NationMaster is a vast compilation of data from such sources as the CIA World Factbook, UN, and OECD. Using the form above, you can generate maps and graphs on all kinds of statistics with ease.
    • StateMaster: statistical database which allows you to research and compare a multitude of different data on US states. Information compiled from various primary sources such as the US Census Bureau, the FBI, and the National Center for Educational Statistics. More than just a mere collection of various data, StateMaster goes beyond the numbers to provide you with visualization technology like pie charts, maps, graphs and scatterplots. We also have thousands of map and flag images, state profiles, and correlations.
  • The National Map (The U.S. Geological Survey--USGS): Provides public access to high-quality, geospatial data and information from multiple partners to help support decision-making by resource managers and the public…to enhance America's ability to access, integrate, and apply geospatial data at global, national, and local scales.
  • NativeWeb: disseminates information from and about indigenous nations, peoples, and organizations around the world; to foster communication between native and non-native peoples; to conduct research involving indigenous peoples' usage of technology and the Internet; and to provide resources, mentoring, and services to facilitate indigenous peoples' use of this technology.
  • Newspapers24.com: 12,000 online newspapers from around the world.
  • Perry-Castañeda Map Collection – The University of Texas-Austin Libraries: a one-stop shopping site; not only will you find many different types of maps right here, but links are also provided to related maps all over the Internet.
  • Perpetual Calendar Index (1801-2100): Need help in locating the date for planning future programs, schedules, academic calendars?
  • Social Encyclical Primer (USCCB): The history of Catholic social teaching, specifically as it has been expressed through papal encyclicals.
  • Spark Notes: study guides to help students learn and practice basic skills, write a paper, study for a test and achieve their academic goals. Each guide contains thorough summaries and insightful critical analysis of a nearly endless range of subjects including English literature, Shakespeare, History and Math and Science.
  • Synagoga Judaica (Juden-schül) by Johannes Buxtorf. A Christian’s observations scrupulously documenting the customs and society of German Jewry in the early 1600s. Newly translated and annotated in English by Alan D. Corré.
  • Varsity Tutors Learning Tools: it is the world's largest free practice test and assessment site. In total, we have over 40,000 professionally written problems and thousands of distinct practice tests across 120 subjects.
  • Watch Documentary: Browse countless free documentaries online according to their topic, includes these popular series: Alistair Cooke's America, American Revolution, Blue Planet, History's Turning Points, Modern Marvels, Myth Busters, NOVA, Planet Earth, and many more.
  • wikiHow - How to do anything: The world’s collaborative how to manual. "We are driven by a shared passion to create a high-quality collection of how-to guides…the single most helpful set of step-by-step instructions available on that topic anywhere." See Explore Categories at bottom of home page.
  • Wolfram|Alpha - Computational Knowledge Engine Gives you access to the world's facts, without searching. Contains 10+ trillion pieces of data, 50,000+ types of algorithms and models, and linguistic capabilities for 1000+ domains. Check out Examples by Topic.

       Dictionaries and Encyclopedias:               Index

  • Acronym Finder: The world's largest and most accurate dictionary of acronyms, abbreviations, and initialisms. Searching over 2,438,000 definitions!
  • Answers.com: Online Encyclopedia, Thesaurus, Dictionary, Almanac, and more answers.
  • Bartleby.com: preeminent publisher of the classics of literature, reference, quotations and verse free of charge for the home, classroom, and desktop of each and every Internet participant.
  • Bee Dictionary: Online American English dictionary With Flash Cards, Pronunciations & More.
  • Big Huge Thesaurus: Synonyms, antonyms, and rhymes. Also blog post ideas and story plot/logline resources for writers.
  • Chat Slang: Resource for chat slang and emoticons. You can look up the meanings of acronyms, abbreviations, slang terms, and emoticons using the Search box in the upper-left corner of each page. You may also browse the terms alphabetically or browse by category using the links in the navigation bar to the left.
  • Dictionary.com: Unabridged, Random House Dictionary. Also, Includes "Cite This Source" with style formats for American Psychological Association (APA), Chicago Manual Style (CMS) and Modern Language Association (MLA).
  • Dictionary of Human Resource Management (2 rev. ed.): by Edmund Heery and Mike Noon (Oxford Resources). Comprises over 1,400 entries on human resource management, personnel, and industrial relations. Scroll down for Entries.
  • Encyclopedia Mythica: online encyclopedia on mythology, folklore, heroes and heroines and legends. It currently contains over 7,000 entries on gods and goddesses, heroes, legendary creatures and beings from all over the world.
  • The Encyclopedia of Television: more than 1,000 original essays from more than 250 contributors and examines specific programs and people, historic moments and trends, major policy disputes and such topics as violence, tabloid television and the quiz show scandal.
  • Fact Monster: reference site for kids that provides a dictionary, encyclopedia, almanac as well as homework help and a variety of daily features, including This Day in History, Today's Birthday, and educational games – Fact Monster is indeed a monster site!
  • The Free Dictionary: English, Medical, Legal, Financial, and Computer Dictionaries, Thesaurus, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, a Literature Reference Library, and a Search Engine all in one!
  • Glossary of Meteorological Terms: Terms used by meteorologists, forecasters, weather observers, and in weather forecasts. Compiled from multiple sources by The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.
  • InfoPlease: Encyclopedia, Almanac, Atlas, Biographies, Dictionary, Thesaurus, "This Day in History."
  • Internet Slang Dictionary and Translator: Assists parents and teachers in learning what kids are chatting about. Slang Translator is for translating individual words or phrases, Slang Dictionary is for researching words and the important Netspeak Guide gives individuals who are not 'internet lingo savvy' access to articles and resources to help further understand internet slang, online acronyms, net trends, and overall internet etiquette.
  • Glossary of Legal Terms: Administrative Office of the U.S. Courts on behalf of the Federal Judiciary.
  • Merriam-Webster's WordCentral: There is an online dictionary, a thesaurus and even a section where you can create your own word collection. Teachers, the ‘For Educators’ section will point you to all sorts of valuable word resources.
  • The Old Farmer's Almanac: since 1792, has published useful information for people in all walks of life: tide tables for those who live near the ocean; sunrise tables and planting charts for those who live on the farm; recipes for those who live in the kitchen; and forecasts for those who don't like the question of weather left up in the air. "Our main endeavour is to be useful, but with a pleasant degree of humor."
  • OneLook Dictionaries: The ultimate "Search dictionary web sites for words and phrases," indexes over 18,373,069 words in 1052 dictionaries. A unique feature of the site is the capability to enter a pattern of letters with wildcard symbols allowing you to retrieve the words that match the entered pattern.
  • Online Etymological Dictionary: Etymologies are not definitions; they're explanations of what our words meant and how they sounded 600 or 2,000 years ago.
  • The Phrase Finder Meanings and Origins of Phrases, Sayings and Idioms
  • Political Dictionary: Taegan Goddard's Political Dictionary takes apart the language of politics to uncover its deeper meanings and broader significance.
  • Science Dictionary (American Heritage): clearly describes the complex language of specialized branches for a wide audience. Biographies of eminent scientists are included along with the applied vocabularies of chemistry, biology, physics, engineering, computer science, and more.
  • Science and Engineering Encyclopedia: Will be of great use to students of engineering and science, and educators working in these broad areas. Visitors can click around at their leisure through the alphabet of terms, or they may also wish to start off in one of the topical areas, which include mechanical engineering, computing, chemistry, and physics.
  • The Skeptics Dictionary: A Collection of Strange Beliefs, Amusing Deceptions, and Dangerous Delusions (and how to think critically about them). You'll find over 400 listings alphabetically indexed 'from abracadabra to zombies.'
  • Sports Definitions: a sports dictionary which explains the key terms in over 175 sports and games.
  • Synonym-Finder: Dictionary of Synonyms Online. Speak and write with confidence. To help you avoid using the same word too repetitively, redundantly, recurrently, incessantly, etc.… Note links at top of page to search for Antonyms and Definitions.
  • Virtual Reference Shelf (Library of Congress): Almanacs & Fast Facts | Calculators | Dictionaries & Thesauri | Encyclopedias | English Language & Literature | General Reference Resources | History (U.S.) | Politics & Government | Quotations | Research & Documentation | Science & Technology
  • Word-Buff: covers the fanatical sub-cultures that have exploded in recent years around Crosswords, Scrabble, and Spelling Bees. Hundreds of free tips, lists, and other cool resources put together by people…who play word games to win.
  • The Word Detective on the Web: online version of The Word Detective, a newspaper column answering readers' questions about words and language.
  • Word-Origins – The Big List: some 400 word and phrase origins.
  • World Wide Words by Michael Quinion: Featuring new words, word histories, the background to words in the news, and the curiosities of native English speech.
  • YourDictionary.com: most comprehensive and authoritative language portal on the web. Includes Grammar and Reference Articles | Webster's New World College Dictionary | Webster's New World Law Dictionaries | Webster's New World Roget's A-Z Thesaurus | and other Vocabulary Aids.

       Speeches and Quotations:               Index

  • American Rhetoric: comprehensive online speech databank to 5000+ full text, audio and video versions of public speeches, sermons, legal proceedings, lectures, debates, interviews, other recorded media events, and a declaration or two.
  • The Art of the Commencement Speech, an Archive: Index of Outstanding Speeches from 1936 onward.
  • Bartlett’s Familiar Quotations: A Collection of Passages, Phrases, and Proverbs Traced to Their Sources in Ancient and Modern Literature. Alphabetic Index of Authors.
  • Brainy Quote: Famous Quotes and Quotations. Search famous quotations by topic, author, nationality.
  • Curated Quotes: "We collect and curate only the best quotes, and display them in a clutter free, aesthetic list."
  • Dictionary of Quotes: sayings of the famous who have inspired us with words of wisdom.
  • Eigen's Political & Historical Quotations: world's largest collection of memorable quotes about and by historians, politicians and other public figures. The collection is designed for the use of students, journalists, teachers, historians, political scientists and the many other people who are interested in politics and political history.
  • Famous or Well-Known Sayings from the Bible. The English language (as well as other languages) has been full of phrases and proverbs from the Bible. "Cleanliness is next to godliness" is not one of biblical origin. Neither is "God helps those who help themselves." That one is from Poor Richard's Almanac.
  • Famous Quotes and Authors: the most complete and useful web resource about Famous Quotes for all occasions! Browse over 25,000 quotes online from over 6,700 famous authors.
  • Great Speeches Collection: The History Place.
  • LitQuotes - Quotes from Literature: This literary reference site features quotations from the great works of literature. You can search for quotes in a number of different ways.
  • ML Quotes: Discover the power of quotes. Quotations listed by author and topic.
  • More Illustrations: Over 20,000 illustrations, anecdotes, stories, jokes, sayings, maxims, and quotations on more than 2,000 topics, a valuable resource for preachers, teachers, youth leaders and anyone who is tasked in public speaking.
  • Positive Sayings: Search by speaker/author, keyword/phrase, or by category.
  • Quotations Book: 43,000 quotes by over 7,000 people in over 1200 subjects.
  • The Quotations Page: over 26,000 quotations online from over 3,100 authors, and more are added daily.
  • The Quotations & Sayings Database: Quotes by subject or author, Great Speeches, proverbs and sayings.
  • Quotery: An Encyclopedia of Wit and Wisdom of Quips, Quotes and Proverbs. Check out search by Topics in left column.
  • TheQuotes.net: Motivational quotes in both text and picture formats. Read inspirational articles and watch inspiring speeches of great leaders.
  • Quotes About Writing!
  • Quotes Daddy: features over 1,000,000 quotations. It lets you add, share and even create your own quotes.
  • The Quote Garden: a searchable collection of inspirational, funny, thought-provoking, famous, and literary quotations, arranged by subject.
  • "Quotes of the Day": WikiQuote: quotations of the day arranged by year and month.
  • Said What?: Famous quotes, inspirational quotes, serious quotes, funny quotes, motivational quotes. Said What? has over 22,000 quotes and proverbs online…the only site you will ever need.....you can quote us on it!
  • The Samuel Johnson Sound Bite Page: The most comprehensive collection of Samuel Johnson quotations on the web, often referred to as "Doctor Johnson". Over 1,800 quotes from Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), one of the most quoted men of the 18th century.
  • Speeches and Writings - Presidents and Other Great Americans: Expressions by Presidents, other noteworthy Americans, and friends that reflect love, pride, respect, and / or support of the USA, even during times of war and tragedy.
  • Speeches of John F. Kennedy
  • Speeches of Robert F. Kennedy
  • ThinkExist - Quotation Search Engine and Directory: over 90,000 quotations by over 9,000 authors in the English language.
  • Wikiquote: compendium of quotations from notable people and creative works in every language, translations of non-English quotes, and links to Wikipedia for further information.
  • Wisdom Quotes: Quotations to Inspire and Challenge
  • World of Quotes: Quotes and Proverb Archive. Search by Topics, Authors, Proverbs, Today in History and Historical Documents.
  • You Quoted: Motivational, Inspirational, Famous Quotes.

Sciences:               Index

  • Action Bioscience: provides articles by scientists, science educators and students on issues related to seven primary areas, including genomics, biotechnology, evolution, and biodiversity. All of the pieces on the site go through a peer-review process and are written with a keen eye towards providing information in a way that is largely jargon-free and highly accessible.
  • BBC - Science
  • BioOne: Provides access to critical, peer-reviewed research in biological, ecological, and environmental sciences rom BioOne's 167 journals and book series.  Now available for easy access to faculty, students, and researchers via their iPhones, Androids, and Blackberry smartphones. Click on Browse/Collections to bring up all journals, select journal and click on current issue, or past issues. Click on the Resources tab for Student and Researcher Guides & Tutorials.
  • BioInteractive: Free Resources for Science Education (Howard Hughes Medical Institute). Free resources for science teachers and students, including animations, short films, and apps.
  • BioSciEdNet - National Science Digital Library (NSDL): high-quality educational resources for science educators everywhere…the resources here total over 14,000, and cover 77 discrete biological sciences topics. BEN resources can help engage student interest, shorten lesson preparation time, provide concept updates, and develop curricula that are in line with national standards for content, use of animals and humans, and student safety.
  • CK-12 Teacher: Free Customizable Teaching Resources for K-12 - specializing in mathematics, sciences, SAT prep.
  • CyberBridge - Harvard University: Designed to help students transition from high school to the first year of Life Sciences courses. Sections include: Math in Biology, Types of Bonding, Structure of DNA, Mendel’s Laws, Population Genetics, Mitosis & Meiosis.
  • Did You Ever Wonder?: Developed by The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. A dynamic project designed to allow renowned lab scientists the opportunity to answer questions on a variety of subjects, twelve different questions being posed each month.
    • Everyday Mysteries: Get the answers to these and many other of life's most interesting questions through scientific inquiry. Questions are answered by research librarians from the Library of Congress’ (LOC) Science Reference Services.
  • Discovery News: Science and technology news from Discovery Communications. Features breaking news and in-depth articles related to the Earth, Space, Tech, Animals, Dinosaurs, Archaeology, Human and History.
    • A Drop of Water – 2000 frames per second. Watch the 2-minute video that shows a drop of water falling into a puddle at 2000 frames a second. You will see something totally unexpected. "Doc" of M.I.T., explains the physics of the event. From Discovery Channel's series 'Time Warp' where MIT scientist and teacher Jeff Lieberman and digital-imaging expert Matt Kearney use the latest in high-speed photography to turn never-before-seen wonders into an experience of beauty and learning.
    • Red Orbit: the premier internet destination for space, science, health, and technology enthusiasts around the globe with over 300,000 pages covering the vast ideological spectrums of space, science, health, and technology.
  • The Earth Science World Image Bank: a service provided by the American Geosciences Institute (AGI). This Image Bank is designed to provide quality geoscience images to the public, educators, and the geoscience community. Resources for Educators.
  • Einstein Papers Project (Cal Tech): access database of 80,000 records of all known Einstein manuscripts and correspondence and also search the full text of 2,000 digitized items.
  • eNature: premier destination for information about the wild animals and plants of the United States. Includes Online Field Guides for flora and fauna, Gardening for Wildlife to help you with your garden patrol and a Birds and Birding for bird enthusiasts. A zip code search is available to help you locate and research your local wildlife.
    • The Encyclopedia of Earth: Reference about the Earth, its natural environments, and their interaction with society. Note "Topics" in left margin.
    • Encyclopedia of Life (EOL): Information about all life on Earth - one web page for each species. But EOL is much more than 1.9 million species pages. It's an incredible resource for text, images, video, sounds, maps, classifications and more, all freely available online.
    • NatureServe Explorer - An Online Encyclopedia of Life: an authoritative source for information on more than 65,000 plants, animals, and ecosystems of the United States and Canada. Explorer includes particularly in-depth coverage for rare and endangered species.
  • Exemplar - Search for Words in Context. Discover how a particular term or phrase is used in scientific literature.
  • The Eye of Science Project: 'combines scientific exactness with aesthetic appearances, and thereby help to bridge the gap between the world of science and the world of art.' Browse through images of Crystals, Bacteria/Viruses, Botany, Medicine, Fungus, Technic and Zoology (click on Gallery).
  • Karen's Calculator: a high-precision calculator. Unlike ordinary calculators, it returns completely accurate results, even with operands containing thousands of digits. If you're patient, operands and results containing hundreds of thousands of digits are possible too!
    • MegaConverter2 convert just about anything from one unit to a different unit—angles, area, finance interest, fractions to decimals, kitchen measures, power, pressure, flowrate with lots of units in between. Also, includes a MegaCalculator.
    • Unit Converter Express Version: ultimate resource for unit conversion of length, weight/mass, currency, temperature, engineering units, electricity, and many more.
    • Web2.0calc: a fantastic scientific-based calculator that is available only on the web. It's simple to use, easy to understand, and functions like nobody's business.
  • Learning Science: Divided into seven primary sections, including "Physical Science," "Life Science," "Earth and Space" and "Science & Tech," "Nature of Science." Browse through teaching resources, interactive web-based lessons, and links to external resources created by organizations such as PBS and Rice University. One section worth singling out: "Tools to Do Science."
  • Mathematics of Planet Earth: assembled from the print journals of the MAA: American Mathematical Monthly, Mathematics Magazine, and College Mathematics Journal. The collection contains 16 articles, all related to the Mathematics of Planet Earth 2013 theme.
  • Medical Student Resources and Software: University of Virginia's School of Medicine has created a set of relevant websites that can be useful for medical students and others with an interest in related fields such as "A & P," "Biochemistry", "Nephrology", and "Surgery". Each section contains links from reliable sources, including the University of Toronto, Oxford University, and the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center. The "Gross Anatomy" area is very thorough, as it contains over twenty resources that provide an overview of anatomy, anatomical slide shows…
  • Nanotechnology Curriculum Materials: Based at Cornell University, the National Nanotechnology Infrastructure Network (NNIN) works to provide helpful information about the world of nanotechnology to a range of partners and stakeholders. This fine corner of their site provides interested parties with a range of curriculum materials that covers biology, general science, chemistry, environmental science, and technology.
  • NASA eClips™ - short relevant educational video segments exploring current applications of science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, topics. The programs are produced for targeted audiences: K-5, 6-8, 9-12 and the general public. Note the selection along the left margin.
    • NASA Instructional Units and Lesson Plans (TeacherLink initiative at Utah State University College of Education): Provides direct access to NASA instructional units and lesson plans. Visitors will note that there are over 40 different resources here, listed alphabetically.
  • The National Academies bring together committees of experts in all areas of scientific and technological endeavor. Four organizations comprise the Academies: the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Engineering, the Institute of Medicine and the National Research Council.
  • National Geographic Explorer: classroom magazine for grades two through six. Its pages invite students to explore the world and all that is in it. This website provides an extension to the National Geographic magazine and allows students to explore in a fun, safe, online environment.
  • Natural History Museum - UK: a world-class resource to assist learners enjoy the natural world, develop their scientific knowledge and understand the impact of science on their lives. Explore Nature videos, news, science of natural history, collections/exhibitions, teachers' resources, educational activities.
  • National Science Foundation's Classroom Resources: online library of resources for Astronomy & Space | Biology | Chemistry | Earth & Environment | Education | Engineering | Nanoscience | Physics.
  • Neuroscience & the Classroom: Neuroscience continues to attract a range of scientists and researchers, and more and more schools are incorporating at least a basic discussion of this area of science into their curriculum. This educational series produced by the Science Media Group at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics along with several other organizations offers 42 video segments for classroom use.
  • NIH Curriculum Supplements: Teacher’s guides of two weeks of lessons on the science behind selected health topics. They combine cutting-edge biomedical discoveries with state-of-the-art instructional practices.
  • NOVA scienceNOW: featuring stories from the frontlines of health & biosciences, technology & math, medicine, and more
    • NOVA Education: Free educator library includes videos, audio segments, lesson plans, and interactives designed to facilitate effective classroom integration.
  • Office of Science: Discovery & Innovation (U.S. Dept. Energy). Browse through recent stories that address nanoscience's role in creating "lithium-air" batteries and efforts to recycle waste heat into electricity. Also includes a fascinating area called Brief Science Highlights, profiles of work on drug discovery aided by supercomputers and the quest for new desalination technology. The site is rounded out by a section called Small Business Innovation Research and Small Business Technology Transfer Highlights.
  • Pedagogy in Action - Science Education Resource Center (SERC) at Carleton College: Source of excellent classroom resources, including lesson plans on science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and more. This module takes a look at the undergraduate research experience.
  • Pilot Weather & Standard Briefing Resources: Useful sites for aviation weather and flight planning.
  • The Power of Discovery: STEM2 effort mobilizes a broad coalition of community partners with STEM resources and expertise…by providing guidance, training, and support for the development of high-quality STEM programs.
    • I-STEM Resource Network - Lesson Plans: To help Indiana become a national leader in student academic achievement in STEM disciplines. This section of their well-thought out website provides a wealth of information on excellent lesson plans crafted by their team of experts.
  • Public Health Image Library (PHIL): offers "an organized, universal electronic gateway to the Center for Disease Control's pictures." The site welcomes public health professionals, laboratory scientists, students and the general public to use this material for reference, teaching, presentation, and public health messages.
  • The Public Library of Science (PLoS) ONE: a peer-reviewed, open-access and online publication that publishes articles from all the branches of science and medicine. Browse Articles by Subject.
  • Science360 Knowledge Network (National Science Foundation): Immerses visitors in the latest wonders of science, engineering, technology and math with the latest science videos provided by scientists, colleges and universities, science and engineering centers, the National Science Foundation and more.
  • Science of Everyday Stuff: A team-up of Discovery Education and 3M. Students and teachers from kindergarten to the 12th Grade can use the site. Learning tools are separately arranged for students, teachers, and families.
  • Science behind the News - free resource of NBC Learn. NBC has partnered with the National Science Foundation in an educational initiative that seeks to explain the science behind everyday events. Check additional NBC Learn free resources in left column.
  • Science Books Online: free science e-books, textbooks, lecture notes, monographs, and other science related documents. All texts are available for free reading online, or for downloading in various formats.
  • Science Dictionary (American Heritage): clearly describes the complex language of specialized branches for a wide audience. Biographies of eminent scientists are included along with the applied vocabularies of chemistry, biology, physics, engineering, computer science, and more.
    • Science and Engineering Encyclopedia: Will be of great use to students of engineering and science, and educators working in these broad areas. Visitors can click around at their leisure through the alphabet of terms, or they may also wish to start off in one of the topical areas, which include mechanical engineering, computing, chemistry, and physics.
  • Science Direct: world's largest electronic collection of science, technology and medicine full text and bibliographic information.
  • Science Education: Research & Training (NIH): high-quality digital content for scientists, teachers, and the general public. First up is the Microscope Imaging Station…where visitors can use the virtual "station" to learn about immune cells and sea urchins that are "bent on destruction". In the "Office of Science Education" section, visitors will find fact sheets, lesson plans, and posters that deal with 41 different topics, including bioethics and the digestive system. There are six other sections here, including "Environmental Health Science Education" and "Health & Education".
  • Science Friday: With a deep archive of past programs and video clips, the website for NPR's Science Friday program is quite a find. The program is hosted by Ira Flatow, and each week he and his colleagues "focus on science topics that are in the news and try to bring an educated, balanced discussion to bear on the scientific issues at hand." Check out the "Latest Videos" section.
  • Science.gov: provides search of more than 50 million pages of science information with just one query, and is a gateway to over 1,800 scientific Web sites and 30 deep Web databases.
  • Science Education: Research & Training (National Institutes of Health). This NIH  website offers helpful science education resources for young people from the elementary grades to college. Front and center here is the Featured Site, which might at any given visit contain an interactive exploration of the human eye, a series of pages on environmental health designed for children, or another science-related gem. Scrolling down, visitors will find the Resources for Educators area.
  • Science of Innovation (National Science Foundation): This eleven part series, created by the NSF, the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, and NBC Learn, explores the science of innovation. Narrated by newscaster Ann Curry, each segment is approximately five minutes.
  • Science News - Magazine for the Society of Science and the Public. Covers everything about science, from Atoms & Cosmos, Body & Brain, Earth, Environment, Genes & Cells, Humans, Life, Matter & Energy, Molecules to Science News for Kids.
    • Science News for Students: science news for children of ages 9 to 13. Timely items of interest to kids, accompanied by suggestions for hands-on activities, books, articles, Web resources, and other useful materials. At the same time, offering teachers creative ways of using science news in their classrooms.
  • Science and Photography Through the Microscope: devoted to microscopy science education. Provides both a fine image bank for general use and general information about the art and science of this interesting field of scientific endeavor. The first stop for most visitors should be the education image library area of the site.
  • Science Reference Services (Library of Congress): provide reference and bibliographic services and to develop the collections in all areas of science and technology.
  • Smithsonian Science Education Center: committed to improving "the learning and teaching of science in school districts in the United States and throughout the world."
  • Teacher Institute Teaching Tips (Exploratorium): bite-sized podcast for science teachers, by science teachers. In each five-minute episode, we give you hands-on activities, science facts, science history, pedagogy tips for new teachers, or other ideas for your science classroom.
  • Teaching Quantitative Skills in the Geosciences. Helping students master skills ranging from simple arithmetic or graphing, to sophisticated use of equations and models is an integral aspect of teaching geoscience at the undergraduate level.
  • ToxLearn: A Multi-Module Toxicology Tutorial. Created by the U.S. National Library of Medicine's Toxicology and Environmental Health Information Program and the U.S. Society of Toxicology to provide an introduction to fundamental toxicological principles and concepts.
  • Try Science: discover the amazing world of science and technology "Science is exciting, and it's for everyone!" Science centers around the world contribute to this site, updating it with new content often; the site is always changing, never boring.
  • Understanding Science - How Science Really Works (UC-Berkeley): Understanding Science 101 area includes quick reviews of topics like How Science Works, What is Science?, and Why Science Matters. The Resource Library contains classroom activities, teaching tools, and strategies for keeping students thinking and engaged.
    • Understanding Science: Teaching Resources. A variety of resources to help you increase student understanding of nature and process of science. To improve your own content knowledge, explore Understanding Science 101 and our resource library.
  • World Wide Science: a global science gateway connecting you to national and international scientific databases. Accelerates scientific discovery and progress by providing one-stop searching of global science sources.
  • Writing Guidelines for Engineering and Science Students: designed to help students communicate their technical work. To that end, these guidelines contain advice, models, and exercises for common writing and speaking assignments in engineering and science.

       Anatomy & Physiology:               Index

  • The Anatomy Lesson: a regional/systemic approach to the study of anatomy which takes a look at each system separately (vascular, respiratory, etc.) Each lesson will point out various structures found in the particular region being examined and then followed by a review of what has been covered.
    • Atlas of the Human Body - American Medical Association: Examine simple and effective diagrams of the circulatory system, the brain, the torso, the female reproductive system, and others. The section titled "Effects of Stroke" is quite effective, and this site will be a useful resource for the general public, medical professionals, and others working in related fields.
    • The Body Explained: Cassius Bordelon, PhD offers light-hearted answers to common questions about how the human body works. Segments generally run one minute and are designed to help capture students' attention and curiosity.
    • Bodymaps: Interactive 3D Human Body Map Online (Healthline). Would you like to know how human organs look, or how your arteries and veins are laid out within the circulatory system? This flash-based app offers a comprehensive 3D map of the human body that you can easily zoom through and manipulate.
    • eMedlas.com: one of the best human anatomy online compilation that provides a great selection of the anatomy of the human body through hundreds of dissections and preparations. Our online histology section details the most important 400 human histological structures.
    • Get Body Smart: This remarkable online textbook was created by McGraw Hill Higher Education. The site contains eleven subject areas: Overview of Human Body Systems | Skeletal System | Muscle Tissue Physiology | Muscular System | Nervous System | Circulatory (Cardiovascular) System | Respiratory System | Urinary System | Histology | Anatomy and Physiology Quizzes.
    • Gray’s Anatomy of the Human Body -  the classic publication on the 'study of body structure.' The Bartleby.com edition of the 20th edition Gray’s 'features 1,247 vibrant engravings -- many in color -- from the classic 1918 publication, as well as a subject index with 13,000. Many of these illustrations are in color and unchanged since the first edition in 1859. The search feature gives you direct access to the information and illustrations.
    • Human Anatomy Online - inner exploration of Human Anatomy. Each topic has animations, 100’s of graphics, and thousands of descriptive links. Study the anatomy of the human body. It’s fun, interactive, and an ideal reference site for students or those who just want to know more about the medical descriptions used by doctors and nurses.
    • Muscle Atlas - Musculoskeletal Radiology: Created by Doctor Michael Richardson at the University of Washington, this online muscle atlas covers the lower and upper extremity, and is primarily designed for use by health science professionals.
    • The Virtual Body (MEDtropolis): aims to educate kids and adult on bodily health; understanding the human anatomical structure is just part of the process. The Virtual Body takes you on four tours - The Human Brain, Skeleton, Human Heart, and Digestive Tract.
    • Web Anatomy: University of Minnesota has created this interactive and engaging set of learning modules to help college students learn about anatomy and physiology.
  • Anatomy and Function of the Normal Lung (American Thoracic Society)
  • The Endocrine System: Diseases, Types of Hormones & More. The endocrine system is one of the body’s main systems for communicating, controlling and coordinating the body’s work. It works with the nervous system, reproductive system, kidneys, gut, liver, pancreas and fat to help maintain and control the following: body energy levels | reproduction | growth and development | internal balance of body systems, called homeostasis | responses to surroundings, stress and injury. Click on the links under the title for other endocrine system information.
    • The Hormone Foundation: a leading educational resource for you, your loved ones, and your health professionals on the prevention, treatment, and cure of hormone-related conditions.
  • eSkeletons (University of Texas-Austin): devoted to the study of human and primate comparative anatomy. It offers a unique set of digitized versions of skeletons in 2-D and 3-D in full color, animations, and supplemental information. The purpose of this site is to enable you to view the bones of both human and non-human primates and to gather information about them from our osteology database.
  • Human Body & Mind - BBC Science: Provide the curious visitor with a plethora of insights into the relationship between the human body and mind. In the Body section, learn more about the organs, muscles, skeleton, and the nervous system. The Mind area explores human emotion, memory retention, emotions and instincts, and a number of other subjects.
  • Inside the Brain: An Interactive Tour. The Alzheimer's Association sponsors this website for the purpose of helping the general public better understand the workings of the brain and 'how Alzheimer's affects it.' There are sixteen interactive slides, each with information on the special features presented in the particular image. Click on "Start Tour."
    • The Learning Brain - Neuroscience. Topics covered include brain structure, neurons and the nervous system, human senses and movement, learning and memory, diseases of the nervous system, and the effects of drugs on the brain and body.
  • Neurons: Animated Cellular and Molecular Concepts (University of Toronto). Visitors will find twelve different topical sections here, including "Anatomy of a Neuron", "Axonal Transport", and "Neurotransmitter Release". Each of these sections includes dynamic visualizations, coupled with textual explanations that help users understand what's going on. And for visitors who find themselves having difficulty navigating the site, there is also a "How to Use the Program" primer that's quite nice. Additionally, teachers and others can download selected animations from the site for use in non-commercial purposes.
  • Visible Proofs - Forensic Views of the Body: The history of forensic medicine struggles to develop scientific methods that translate views of bodies and body parts into "visible proofs" that can persuade judges, juries, and the public. Three online activities and three lesson plans introduce forensic medicine, anthropology, technology, and history. Designed specifically for students and educators, the lesson plans provide educators with ready-made resources for the classroom and the online activities promote active learning for students.
  • The Wellcome Library, London: 100,000 art and medicine images available online for open use. This collection is where to look for offbeat, bizarre photos including medical art of all types…. The images here are absolutely fantastic. The images may be used for commercial or personal purposes, with an acknowledgement of the original source (Wellcome Library, London).

       Animals, Mammals, Birds and Critters:               Index

  • The Academy of Natural Sciences Visual Resources for Ornithology (VIREO): the world's most comprehensive collection of bird photographs. It houses over 105,000 35mm slides and 5,000 black-and-white prints of over 6,300 bird species" and includes every species of bird known in North America.
  • AllAboutBirds: Online Encyclopedia of Birds from Cornell Lab of Ornithology. Free, comprehensive resource for North American birds, bird watching, and bird conservation-accessible to everyone. There is a 'Bird Guide,' including a Video Gallery where you can enjoy videos of birds in their natural habitats.
    • Browse by Name or Shape: Database includes 584 of the more than 700 regularly occurring North American bird species.
    • Macaulay Library’s Animal Sound & Video Catalog (Cornell University’s Lab of Ornithology): contains thousands of audio and video recordings of animals such as the harp seal pup, the golden-fronted woodpecker, and a variety of turkeys. Check out the Best of the Collection links.
    • Birds of the World -  browse through list of all the birds of the world categorized by continent, country. Photos of the birds are fetched from Flickr service, shown along is a link to Wikipedia, with more information about the selected bird.
    • Common Birds of Ohio: 103 of Ohio's most common breeding birds that are found primarily in upland habitats.
    • Geobirds -  identify and track North American birds.
    • Identify North American Birds - Dendroica: interactive website developed to help students, volunteers and professionals improve their skills at identifying birds by sight or by sound, particularly so that they can participate in nature survey and monitoring programs. The site includes birds from throughout Canada, USA, and Mexico.
    • Marine Ornithology -  an International Journal of Seabird research and Conservation. Presents peer reviewed contributions concerning international seabird science and conservation.
    • The Ohio Bird Gallery - Identification of Ohio Birds
  • Aquatic Food Webs (NOAA Education Resources): This collection contains a variety of multimedia, lesson plans, data, activities, and information to help students better understand the interconnectedness of food webs and the role of humans in that web.
  • ARKive: creating the ultimate multimedia guide to the world’s endangered species with the help of the world’s best filmmakers, photographers, conservationists and scientists. Explore site by species or geographical region.
  • The Basking Spot - Herpetology News and Links: Links are divided up into major categories (reptiles, amphibians, Internet resources) and subcategories (snakes, skunks, classified ads, pet stores).
  • Biology–Central America–Digital Collection: This digital edition of the important and out-of-print Biologia Centrali-Americana makes all 58 biological volumes available. Descriptions of over 50,000 and images of over 18,000, species of animals and plants.
  • BugGuide: online insect identification guide of pretty much any insect in North America.
  • Butterflies of North America -  This site will take you on a fabulous butterfly tour of the United States and Mexico, complete with beautiful and detailed color photographs. Search your own state to see what indigenous caterpillars and butterflies exist in your neck of the woods.
  • Dendroica: aid to identifying North American birds by sight or by sound - Canada, USA, and Mexico.
  • Dinosaurs - Fact of Fiction - USGS (U.S. Geological Survey – U.S. Department of the Interior): This pamphlet contains answers to some frequently asked questions about dinosaurs, with current ideas and evidence to correct some long-lived popular misconceptions.
  • Farmers, Warriors, Builders: The Hidden Life of Ants. The Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History has a highly informative and interactive exhibit on ants. The exhibit explains how, much like humans, "ants achieve domination by being social creatures". Dividing the ants' lives into "food", "warriors", "shelter" and "communication", the exhibit offers an array of photos in its photo gallery to illustrate the variety of ant life and behavior on earth.
  • InsectIdentification.com: Insect and Spider Identification. Details on North American Bugs. Includes butterflies & moths | beetles | bees, ants & wasps | flies, | Grasshoppers & Crickets, and more.
  • Insects.org: "Studying Earth's Most Diverse Organisms." Aims to help you really see insects for the miniature marvels they represent and to understand how intertwined our cultures have become with these alien creatures.
  • The Life of Mammals (BBC) -  hosted by Sir David Attenborough. Research a particular species by a variety of methods, by an animal's habitat, by his diet, by body shape, intelligence and behavior, all designed to give an up close and personal introduction to our beastly friends, both domestic and wild.
  • National Geographic's Animals -  dedicated to presenting pictures, facts, habitats and also videos of animals. You can look up your favorite 'Amphibians,' 'Birds', 'Bugs,' 'Fish,' 'Invertebrates,' 'Mammals' and 'Reptiles.' The 'A-to-Z' Animals Directory will help narrow your search.
  • National Invasive Species Information Center (NISIC) -  National Agricultural Library (USDA) gateway to invasive species information; covering Federal, State, local, and international sources. Includes Aquatic Species, Plants, Animals, Microbes, etc.
  • The National Marine Sanctuaries Media Library -  online vault of a comprehensive collection of select video clips and high-resolution still images from America's underwater treasures and available for searchable access and download.
  • Natural History Museum Dino Directory (London): A 'guide to 333 of the most well-described dinosaurs, including 374 images.' Here's your chance to find out about dinosaurs and other extinct creatures. Access answers to questions such as 'What were dinosaurs?', 'What were archosaurs?', as well as facts on other ancient reptiles.
  • NatureFind ( National Wildlife Federation): excellent web resource that makes it easy to locate nearby places for family outdoor activities. These include but not limited to camping and fishing spots, zoos, parks, wildlife sanctuaries and so on.
  • NatureSound Studio: Lang Elliot features the sounds of birds, frogs, mammals, and insects.
    • Frogs and Toads in Color and Sound: a sampling of 12 species of frogs, complete with a detailed picture, actual sound recordings and a short description of the particular frog, his habitat and call.
  • North American Mammals (National Museum of Natural History): a searchable database of all living mammals of North America. Based on "The Smithsonian Book of North American Mammals," by Don E. Wilson and Sue Ruff (Smithsonian Institution Press, 1999) and "Mammals of North America," by Roland W. Kays and Don E. Wilson (Princeton University Press, 2002), over 400 mammals native to North America are included.
  • The Origin of Species: Biointeractive (Howard Hughes Medical Institute). This series deals with two primary questions: How do new species form? and Why are there so many species? Visitors can look over three excellent short films that address these matters. The first explores the epic voyages of Charles Darwin and his initial period of discovery and revelation. The second film, "The Beak of the Finch," looks at four decades of research on finch species that live only on the Galapagos Islands. The final work looks at the ways lizards have adapted to several common habitats with rather interesting results.
  • PBS NATURE - video archives: Search by keyword or by program title. And keep checking back, as video will be continually added to this section.
  • The Reptile Database: a collaboration of hundreds of scientists and hobbyists around the world who study reptiles. Currently, the database includes 9,900 species of reptiles, including another 2,800 subspecies.
  • Singing Insects of North America: created to be of assistance to both professional and amateur biologists interested in studying singing insects.
  • The Spider Myths Site -  Myths, Misconceptions, and Superstitions About Spiders. The spider, a much-aligned creature especially around the Halloween season, is the topic of the Burke Museum of Natural History and Culture site.
  • University of Wisconsin-Madison Zoology Museum Collection -  digitized versions of heavily illustrated biological journals, a few dated as early as 1859, and the majority from the first half of the 20th century. In addition to searching, journals can be displayed in a gallery view, so users can jump quickly to pages of interest. The Galápagos Collection, an important subcollection at the UWZM, includes skeletons, slides, pictures, books, and research papers collected and produced by UW-Madison scientists and researchers during ten expeditions to the Galápagos since 1969.
  • U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service – National Digital Library. An impressive collection of images, historical artifacts, audio clips, publications, and video available at no charge. 12 thematic sections contain a wide mix of items, all of which can be searched by format, date, creator, and so on. The site also contains a keyword search area that allows visitors to look for specific images, videos, or audio clips.
  • USGS Native Bee Inventory and Monitoring Lab: "The mission of the program is to design and develop large and small scale surveys for native bees. As part of the program we also develop identification tools and keys for native bee species. One aspect of creating those tools is creating accurate and detailed pictures of native bees and the plants and insects they interact with."
  • Whaleopedia produced by the Animal Fund): provides students, teachers, and cetacean enthusiasts everywhere an ocean of valuable educational resources, including exclusive videos, pictures, and sound clips. Includes: Baleen Whales, Beaked & Bottlenose Whales, Toothed Great Whales, Oceanic Dolphins, Freshwater & River Dolphins, Porpoises.

       Astronomy and Space:               Index

  • Astronomy - Selected Internet Resources (Science Reference Services, LOC).
  • Amazing Space -  uses the Hubble Space Telescope's discoveries to inspire and educate about the wonders of our universe.
    • Homework Help - Amazing Space -  Get ideas for projects and research them on the Amazing Space site.
    • Teaching tools - Amazing Space -  Reveal the beauty and wonder of the cosmos to your students with this comprehensive listing of all of our interactive activities, graphic organizers, science content reading selections, and more.
    • Tonight’s Sky -  highlights of the October sky. Your guide to constellations, deep sky objects, planets, and events.
  • Discover the Cosmos! - Astronomy Picture of the Day (NASA). Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.
  • HubbleSite - Space Telescope Science Institute's Office of Public Outreach (NASA). "At the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI), we're working hard to study and explain the once-unimaginable celestial phenomena now made visible using Hubble's cutting-edge technology. In the course of this exploration we will continue to share with you the grace and beauty of the universe, because the discoveries belong to all of us."
  • International Space Archives -  a digital library containing the best of the incredible imagery created by our planet's exploration of the universe. These images come from a variety of sources including NASA and other national and private space programs.
  • NASA’s Solar System Exploration -  offers an in-depth look on our stellar neighborhood.
    • NASA Image Gallery: Hi-res image collections available both on their website and on Flickr.
    • NASA’s Astronomy Picture of the Day: Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.
    • Astrobiology Magazine -  NASA sponsors this online archive of past issues, on everything from life on Mars, extrasolar life, stellar evolution and climate. The Image Gallery is dedicated to the art of astrobiology; the Studio presentations give the visitor access to all of the gallery images, the Panoramas let you view the material in flash panoramic as well as zoom style, Terrafirma has the 'EarthView Now.' The search engine is the backbone for detailed research and retrieval of past articles.
    • Great Images in NASA (GRIN): collection of over a thousand images of significant historical interest scanned at high-resolution in several sizes. This collection is intended for the media, publishers, and the general public looking for high-quality photographs. Please note that downloading these image files may take some time, although searching and browsing should be relatively quick.
    • NASA Images -  collection of historic photographs, film and video available to the public. 21 major NASA imagery collections merged into a single searchable online resource.
    • Space Images – NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory: Space Images database features images from across the universe taken by NASA spacecraft.
    • Visible Earth -  a catalog of NASA images and animations of planet earth.
  • NewScientist - Space.com: resource for everything happening on the space frontier! 'Explore by Subject,' 9 subject areas that provide a guide to the various topics, and the 'Special Reports,' more in-depth coverage of selected topics.
  • Planets of the Solar System (PSS): a reference tool with up-to-date basic science knowledge regarding the planets in our solar system…providing not only facts, figures, and raw data for each planet, but also explanations of the fundamental scientific concepts related to the subject.
  • Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory: Affiliated with Harvard University,…include high energy astrophysics, theoretical astrophysics, and optical and infrared astronomy. Find links to curriculum materials and public outreach ideas like "Inside Einstein's Universe" and "Black Holes: Space Warps & Time Twists."
  • Stargazing: Finding the Stars and Constellations (The Old Farmer's Almanac for Kids, Volume 2)
  • Whitney's Star Finder -  developed by Charles A. Whitney, Professor emeritus of Astronomy, Harvard University 'for the amateur astronomer, the student, and the casual observer of the sky.' The visitor will have access to star charts that apply to the current month/s. Eclipse, comet and meteor schedules for particular periods as well as locations for the best sightings are posted regularly.
  • The Windows to the Universe ( National Earth Science Teachers Association): a richly interlinked ecosystem for learning about the Earth and Space sciences , including the Sun, Earth, and the Solar System.

      Biology:               Index

  • The Biology Corner is a resource site for biology and science teachers. The Lesson Plans section contains classroom activities, labs and worksheets, feel free to change any of these to suit your own classroom needs. The Webquest section contains inquiry based projects that utilize the internet. Internet lessons (also called miniquests) are smaller activities that use one or two science related web sites for the students to explore and answer questions about.
  • BioEd Online - Biology Teacher Resources (Baylor College of Medicine). State-of-the-art technology to give you instant access to reliable, cutting-edge information and educational tools for biology and related subjects. Includes Presentations, Slide Sets and Teacher Resources.
    • BioEd Online – Lessons and More (Baylor College of Medicine): Offers high-quality lessons, teacher guides, slides, video and supplemental materials that can be downloaded for use in your classroom. Materials are sorted by format, topic and grade level, making it easy locate content that is appropriate for your students.
  • BioLEARN initiative began developing and testing a collection of biology education materials to place into an online archive. Educators can browse around the materials, which are organized by disciplines such as botany, ecology, genetics, and molecular biology.
  • Biology4Kids -  information on cell structure, cell function, scientific studies, plants, vertebrates, invertebrates, and other life science topics.
  • Biology Animation Library (Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory): Include a brief overview of cloning, several on DNA, gel electrophoresis, and polymerase chain reaction. The site is rounded out by a section on the left-hand side that contains links to other educational resources created by experts at the Dolan DNA Research Center.
  • Biology Browser -  Teaching resources created by Thomson Scientific. Provides science educators with over 190 resources related to various areas of biology activities that can be used in the classroom. Visitors can also glance over a glossary of zoology terms and look over news from the world of taxonomy.
  • Biology – Central America–Digital Collection -  This digital edition of the important and out-of-print Biologia Centrali-Americana makes all 58 biological volumes available. Descriptions of over 50,000 and images of over 18,000, species of animals and plants.
  • Biology Instructional Multimedia: University of Alberta Department of Biology's instructional multimedia page. Includes Biology Intro, Botany, Cell Biology, Ecology, Entomology, Genetics, Microbiology, Lab Procedures and more.
  • BiologyPop: reference site that covers many diverse topics such as cell biology, genetics, anatomy, biotechnology, ecology, and evolution.
  • The Biology Project -  The Chemistry of Amino Acids. A basic introduction to amino acids, offering a brief description of their role as the "building blocks" of protein. After reading the introduction, students can learn about the structure of amino acids, and then take on a few exercises in the "Test yourself" section of the site.
  • Cell Biology Education Resources – American Society for Cell Biology (ASCB): Provides educators and the generally curious with links that are divided into 17 different areas, including Systems Biology, Cytoskeleton & Cell Dynamics, and Microscopy.
    • Cell Biology Online Videos (iBioSeminars): These lectures can be used in the classroom or for personal edification. Visitors can find over a dozen lectures by professors from the University of Utah, the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, MIT, and other schools. Lectures include Tissue Engineering, Fruits of the Genome Sequence, and Bacteriophages: Genes and Genomes.
    • Cell Biology lesson plans and worksheets - LessonCorner.com
  • Dr. Saul’s Biology In Motion -  Animations, interactive activities, and cartoons designed to make learning biology a richer, more engaging experience.
  • Genetics Home Reference provides consumer-friendly information about the effects of genetic variations on human health.
    • Codebreakers: Makers of Modern Genetics (Wellcome Library). An online research resource for the history of genetics, including digitised books and archives from the Wellcome Library and partner institutions.
    • Deciphering the Genetic Code: Marshall Nirenberg (NIH). This exhibit from the NIH looks into the career of Marshall Nirenberg who began to map the method by which DNA is translated into proteins, and solved this conundrum in 1961. Also it provides details about the scientific instruments he used to complete this discovery. The "History" area provides details on the emergence of the modern field of genetics, complete with illustrations and work done by Nirenberg's intellectual predecessors.
    • DNA from the Beginning -  an animated primer on the basics of DNA, genes and heredity. The science behind each concept is explained by: animation, image gallery, video interviews, problem, biographies, and links.
    • Dolan DNA Learning Center - Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory. Your genes, your health.
    • GeneEd: Genetics, Education, Discovery created by National Library of Medicine (NLM), the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI), and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) as a helpful resource for the teaching and learning of genetics. On the site, visitors can find labs and experiments, fact sheets, and teacher resources on topics including DNA forensics, genetic conditions, evolution, and biostatistics.
    • Genetics@Nature: Important findings and discoveries from the world of science, with a particular focus placed on biology, genetics, and related fields. Features articles from a range of journals, including Cell Research, Genes and Immunity, and Gene Therapy…Scroll down the site, to find a selection of "gateways", including thematic sections on cell migration and neuroscience.
    • The Genetic Science Learning Center (University of Utah): Learn.Genetics delivers educational materials on genetics, bioscience and health topics. They are designed to be used by students, teachers and members of the public. The materials meet selected US education standards for science and health. Teach.Genetics provides resources for K-12 teachers, higher education faculty, and public educators.
      • Teach.Genetics - Genetic Science Learning Center (University of Utah): provides resources for K-12 teachers, higher education faculty, and public educators. These include PDF-based Print-and-Go™ activities, unit plans and other supporting resources. The materials are designed to support and extend the materials on Learn.Genetics.
      • Learn.Genetics - Genetic Science Learning Center (University of Utah): delivers educational materials on genetics, bioscience and health topics. They are designed to be used by students, teachers and members of the public. The materials meet selected US education standards for science and health.
    • Understanding Genetics - Human Health and the Genome. Visitors can peruse the questions posed to geneticists in the "Ask a Geneticist" feature, browse a selection of recent news stories regarding genetics, and take a survey on the ethical questions posed by the issues of stem cell research and genetically modified foods.
  • Human Embryology Animations: To help students "better understand the complex processes that must occur in embryologic development." The animations are divided into five thematic sections, including General Embryology, Development of the Limbs, and Urinary and Reproductive Embryology. Each animation lasts anywhere from 20 seconds to 8 minutes, and they cover heart tube folding, septum development, postnatal circulation, and 30 or so other processes.
  • Inside Cancer (Dolan DNA Learning Center of the Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory): a rather remarkable exploration of the nature of cancer in the human body. Utilizing graphics and interactive animations that serve to explain this complex condition, the site is divided into sections that deal with the causes and prevention of cancer, its diagnosis and treatment, and how the disease manifests itself. Each section combines well-drawn animations with video clips of scientists narrating brief passages that illuminate the accompanying descriptions and captions.
  • Inside the Cell: Explores the interior design of cells and vividly describes the processes that take place within its organelles and structures. Chapter 1: An Owner's Guide to the Cell, Chapter 2: Cells 101: Business Basics, Chapter 3: On the Job: Cellular Specialties, Chapter 4: Cellular Reproduction: Multiplication By Division, Chapter 5: The Last Chapter: Cell Aging and Death.
  • MicroMatters™ (bioedonline.org): teaching materials and online resources in microbiology and infectious diseases. An introductory mini-magazine sponsored by the Center for Educational Outreach and Center for AIDS Research at Baylor College of Medicine designed to introduce students to the following topics: Healthy and unhealthy microbes | Communicable diseases | How microbes are spread | Different epidemics in history | The immune system and vaccines | HIV/AIDS.
    • Microorganisms - BioEd Online Lessons: A veritable cornucopia of material for science educators. The offerings here include "Comparing Sizes of Microorganisms," "Observing Different Microbes," and "Microbes and Disease."
  • Microscope Imaging Station (Exploratorium) -  Allows visitors to peer into the cells of living organisms such as sea urchins and zebra fish. Visitors will find a wide range of high-resolution images and movies created with research-grade microscopes.
  • Molecular Movies: A Portal to Cell & Molecular Animation. An organized directory of cell and molecular animations, as well as a collection of original tutorials for life science professionals learning 3D visualization.
  • National Association of Biology Teachers -  “Leader in life science education.”
  • National Center for Biotechnology Information: NCBI's mission is to develop new information technologies to aid in the understanding of fundamental molecular and genetic processes that control health and disease. NCBI Tutorials: Guided tutorials, exercises and problem sets in web, PDF and video formats.
  • Nature Online Video Streaming Archive -  Designed to complement selected articles and letters from Nature magazine, these videos feature analysis and commentary from Nature editors and selected scientists. This archive contains over two dozen video features that report on the honeybee genome, smoking and lung cancer genes, and the evolution of language.
  • NOVA - Life's Greatest Miracle: Tracks the human development from embryo to newborn by way of the extraordinary microimagery of Swedish photographer Lennart Nilsson. Includes explanations of diagnostic and screening techniques currently used to assess the health of an unborn child, the stem cell debate. This site is indeed an important educational resource with a teacher's guide as well as suggestions for associated discussions and activities. This hour-long program is divided into eight chapters.
  • Science at a Distance - E-Learning Modules -  Professor John Blamire has crafted this very fine set of online learning modules for students interested in learning about everything from the properties of proteins to Mendelian genetics.
  • Stalking the Mysterious Microbe -  Discover unseen life on earth. Developed in conjunction with National Public Radio's Talk of the Nation: Science Friday Program, you'll be able to 'Meet the Microbes' such as Virus, Alga, Bacterium and Protozoan.
  • Tour of the Cell (National Science Foundation): The NSF created this illuminating and interactive visual feature to help people learn about the cell's different components. On the homepage, visitors are presented with a clickable illustration of the cell's primary components, including the nucleus, the cell membrane, and mitochondria.
  • Unseen Life on Earth: An Introduction to Microbiology (Oregon Public Broadcasting). Twelve half-hour video programs designed primarily for college and high school students. Throughout the programs, students get to meet up with scientists working in the lab and in the field. Some of the programs here include "Genetic Transfer", "Microbial Evolution", and "The Unity of Living Systems".
  • Virtual General Biology 101 Labs - Rutgers University
  • The Virtual Lab Book: Dr. Stephanie Dellis created by for students beginning the study of molecular biology. The guide is divided into twelve parts, including "Safety in the Molecular Biology Lab", "Minipreparation of Plasmid DNA", and "PCR and Thermacycling". Along with written instructions and particulars, each section also contains a number of helpful diagrams and visual illustrations.
  • Virtual Labs - Howard Hughes Medical Institute’s Biointeractive website educates users about science and technology. Currently, the site contains five full virtual labs, and they include those that allow students to learn how to identify various bacteria and another one that casts participants as a young intern who is learning how to identify heritable diseases of the heart.
  • The Virtual Museum of Bacteria: Visitors will "learn that not all bacteria are harmful, how they are used in industry, that they belong to the oldest living creatures on Earth", and many more interesting facts to discover about the diverse world of bacteria. The "Bacterial Species Files" tab at the top of the page, allows visitors to look up information on 40 different specific bacteria, from Anthrax to Yersinia enterocolitica.

       Botany and Horticulture:               Index

  • Aggie Horticulture -  resources of the teaching, research and extension program at the Texas A & M University System. Enter the 'PLANTanswer Machine' for solutions and information on particular horticulture questions; also access the 'PLANTfacts' search engine for detailed facts on particular species. The 'just for KIDS' section is an interesting resource that helps encourage the younger set to learn about plants, gardening and the natural world.
  • Australian National Herbarium - Centre for Plant Biodiversity Research: "collections of preserved plant and fungal specimens and their associated data…concerned primarily with scientific research and documenting the vast diversity of plant and fungal life." Since the Herbarium is not open to the public, the digitization of the Herbarium collections is important, particularly for botanists.
  • Botanical Garden and Centre for Plant Research (University of British Columbia)
  • Botany and Plant Pathology Outreach Programs (Purdue University): Resources that can be used in classrooms, ideas for science projects, or to increase public awareness about plant science and plant disease related topics.
  • Cleared Leaf Image Database: an online collection of cleared leaf images from different investigators and labs around the world gathered together in a single place." "The leaf images contained within the database are of many types, but are primarily images of cleared leaves where veins have been enhanced relative to the background through the use of chemical clearing or other methods of enhancement."
  • Discover Life: free on-line tools to identify species, share ways to teach and study nature's wonders, report findings, build maps, process images, and contribute to and learn from a growing, interactive encyclopedia of life…
  • EveryRose - The Rose Reference Database -  descriptive information on every rose currently being sold, and the most important historical and species roses. Search for a particular rose by name, by color, by just about any 'rose' characteristic. There are over 7150 different roses listed as well as 2500 photographs.
    • Love of Roses: A great source for resources on growing roses. Plus, free pictures, wallpaper and clipart that you can download.
  • Farmers' Almanac 2010 - Home and Garden Center
  • Flower Gardening Made Easy -  expert tips for a beautiful garden. Covers garden design, perennials, annuals, flowering bulbs, ornamental grass, wildflower, trees, shrubs, and more.
  • Fun Facts About Fungi - Teachers’ Guides. Presented by the Utah State University Intermountain Herbarium, is a learning experience for everyone on the facts about Mycology: The study of fungi, fungi diversity, decay and decomposition, mushroom collecting, and more.
  • Gardening Resources - National Gardening Association. Programs and initiatives highlight the opportunities for plant-based education in schools, communities, and backyards across the country. We serve as a bridge to connect people to gardening in five core fields: plant-based education, health and wellness, environmental stewardship, community development, and responsible home gardening.
    • Gardening Advice (The Old Farmer's Almanac). The best planting garden dates, transplanting gardening tips. Gardening Jobs by the Month: click on a month tab for gardening advice for that month.
    • Garden Planner (The Old Farmer's Almanac): makes it easy to draw out your vegetable beds, add plants and move them around to get the perfect layout. Either feet and inches or metric units are supported and any shape of garden can be created.
    • A Taste of Gardening (University of Illinois-Extensions Horticulture): a vegetable gardening basics series.
  • Herbarium Collections Catalog - University of Florida: Contains over 450,000 specimens in the vascular plant and bryophyte and lichen collections. Currently, over 55,000 of these specimens are available on this searchable database.
  • HortCorner (University of Illinois-Extensions Horticulture): Includes Lawn Care, Fruits & Veggie, Flowers & Ornamentals, Trees & Shrubs, Seasonal, Pest & Diseases.
  • Hydrangeas! Hydrangeas! - About the enjoyment and care of hydrangeas.
    • FAQ: How can I change the color of my hydrangeas?
  • Internet Orchid Photo Encyclopedia -  a comprehensive list of facts and comments on 6047 species of orchids in 606 genera with spectacular pictures of many of the entries.
  • Leafsnap: An Electronic Field Guide. Contains beautiful high-resolution images of leaves, flowers, fruit, petiole, seeds, and bark. This free mobile app uses visual recognition software to help identify tree species from photographs of their leaves.
  • The Life Cycle of Plants: Offers a refresher on the life cycle of plants. The five areas here include "Seed Growth", "Parts of a flower", "Seed Dispersal", and "Plant Identification". Clicking on each of the first three sections mentioned here will reveal a set of interactive diagrams and illustrations that show different scenarios documenting the conditions that can affect plant growth.
  • Mitosis: Learn about the process of cell division by directly interacting with the cell. You'll have a glossary of relevant definitions at your fingertips, and you can listen to a recording that describes mitosis while you follow along in the text. Best of all, Mitosis is a free app for your iPhone or iPod touch.
  • Most Popular Garden Plants (The Old Farmer's Almanac). North America's most popular garden plants and "how to" gardening information to help you prepare, plant, and care for them. For each plant, includes the hardiness zone, sun exposure, soil type, soil pH, pests and problems, harvest tips, recommended varieties, and special features. Or, click the links below to browse by plant type: Vegetables | Fruit | Herbs | Flowers | Shrubs.
  • The Nature & Science of Autumn -  A Guide to Selected Resources (Science Reference Services - LOC). Selected Titles | Selected Articles | Selected Internet Resources.
  • New Farm (Rodale Institute) -  farmer-to-farmer resources, articles and personal stories that explain how to make regenerative farming profitable and build supportive communities.
  • Northwest Ohio Wildflowers: The galleries also specify which Ohio wildflowers are native, non-native, and/or invasive.
  • The Organic Center -  to promote a new found understanding of the health and other benefits of organic foods and production through a comprehensive set of credible, peer-reviewed scientific studies that highlight and underscore the "organic difference."
  • Pesticide Alternatives Laboratory (Whalon Lab/Michigan State) -  committed to researching the most innovative arthropod (bugs) pest management strategies, tactics and tools available to help agricultural producers and private land owners transition to more economical and environmentally friendly reduced risk and organic pest management.
  • The PLANTS Database (USDA): Provides standardized information about the vascular plants, mosses, liverworts, hornworts, and lichens of the U.S. and its territories. This information primarily promotes land conservation in the United States and its territories, but academic, educational, and general use is encouraged.
  • Plant Genome Research Outreach Portal (Iowa State University): The site contains fact sheets, lesson plans, and other materials for students and educators, including specifically themed resources on crops like maize, rice, sorghum, soybeans, and wheat.
  • The Plant List: a growing, comprehensive scientific plant name dictionary of all plant species. Here, you can browse through more than a million plants categorized by their taxonomy. You can also view the entire plant list by family or genus. Scroll down page for Plant List.
  • PlantNative: dedicated to moving native plants and naturescaping into mainstream landscaping practices. Our goal is to increase public awareness of native plants and related landscaping practices and to increase both the supply of and demand for native plants.
  • The Rain Barrel Company: leading resource of rain barrels for rain water recycling, renewable water solutions, water recycling. Embrace nature's solution to our emerging water shortage with eco-friendly, green solutions.
  • The Rodale Institute: pioneering research on organic farming versus conventional farming for farmers, gardeners, and the general public alike. The "New Farm" link is the online incarnation of their print publication that has been providing "farmer-to-farmer resources, articles and personal stories."
  • The Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute -  a list of plants and animals that are known to occur in the Bocas del Toro Archipelago, the Bahía Almirante, Laguna de Chiriquí, and the surrounding mainland on the Caribbean coast of Panama
  • Tom Volke's Fungi -  A comprehensive study of mushrooms including a search facility to help you locate the exact fungi that you're seeking. Don't think you have to be a biologist to find this feature valuable…helpful for 'choosing and using the different mushrooms for various dishes…interesting to anyone who enjoys eating, growing or cooking with these fungi.'
  • UI Plants (University of Illinois): database on woody landscape plant identification, culture and usage for the Midwest, including native and introduced species and their major varieties and cultivars. This encyclopedic resource serves as a learning tool for students, avid gardeners and industry practitioners who want basic and in-depth information on woody plants commonly found in the northern portion of eastern North America.
  • USDA - National Agricultural Library (NAL): one of four national libraries of the United States. It houses one of the world's largest and most accessible agricultural information collections and serves as the nexus for a national network of state land-grant and U.S. Department of Agriculture field libraries.
    • Alternative Farming Systems Information Center: The USDA–National Agricultural Library's website focuses on topics related to sustainable and alternative agricultural systems, crops and livestock, which includes ecological pest management, agritourism, renewable energy on the farm, and aquaculture.
    • United States Department of Agriculture: USDA has some fantastic high-res photos available for download that are copyright-free, public domain, images of crops, animals, insects, food, plants, and more.
  • Vegetable Gardening Ideas -  your complete guide to starting a vegetable garden.
  • vPlants -  the vPlants database allows browsing 90,000 plant specimens. Visitors can search for plant names by family, genus, or common name, also browse a glossary of terms and a set of external links. The database brings the plant life of the region to life through its mix of visual materials and well-written descriptions.
  • WebGarden - Horticulture and Crop Science in Virtual Perspective -  developed by Ohio State University to research just about anything related to plants and horticulture. The PlantFacts supports an Internet search engine with '260,000 pages of information from every land-grant university in the U.S. and several government institutions across Canada.' You'll have access to plant Images, in particular, a Plant Dictionary, 'a searchable database of high quality images featuring Ornamental plants, Turf, Plant Diseases, and Insects.' There are also '200 short gardening how-to videos, ranging from tips on basic landscaping to lessons on deadheading roses.' The FAQ's have 'illustrated answers to over 800 commonly asked Gardening Questions, ranging from when to plant annuals to watering large shade trees.'
  • The Wildflower Center's Native Plant Information Network allows you to search for native plant info by plant traits or names, browse through our collection of 17,000 native plant images, and pose your plant question to our resident horticulturalist.
    • The Native Plants Database -  Search for native plants by scientific or common name or choose a particular family of plants. If you are not sure what you are looking for, try the combination search or our Recommended Species lists to explore the wealth of native plants in North America.

       Chemistry:               Index

  • AP Chemistry Course Home Page: Stresses mastering the conceptual and quantitative aspects of chemistry, by enhancing students' qualitative understanding and visualization of the particulate nature of matter through the development of students' inquiry, analytical, and reasoning skills.
  • Battery University: free educational website that offers hands-on battery information to engineers, educators, media, students and battery users alike. The tutorials evaluate the advantages and limitations of battery chemistries, advise on best battery choice and suggest ways to extend battery life.
  • Chem4Kids -  information on matter, atoms, elements, the periodic table, reactions, and biochemistry.
  • ChemCollective (Carnegie Mellon University): Collection of virtual labs, scenario-based learning activities, tutorials, and concept tests. Teachers can use our content for pre-labs, for alternatives to textbook homework, and for in-class activities for individuals or teams. Students can review and learn chemistry concepts using our virtual labs, simulations, and tutorials.
  • Chemistry Educational Digital Library (ChemEd DL): "destination for digital content intended for chemical science education." Partnered by the National Science Digital Library (NSDL), the Journal of Chemical Education, and The Chemistry Collective.
  • Chemistry Laboratory Techniques (MIT's Open Course Ware): Learning to navigate the treacherous shoals of the chemistry laboratory is tricky business. The course consists of "intensive practical training in basic chemistry lab techniques" and the site includes a host of instructional videos.
  • Chemistry & Materials Classroom Resources – National Science Foundation: Includes Chemistry Now and ChemTutor.
  • Chemistry Now: The National Science Foundation (NSF) has joined forces with NBC Learn and the National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) to celebrate the International Year of Chemistry by creating "Chemistry Now" - a weekly, online video series that uncovers and explains the science of common, physical objects in our world and the changes they undergo every day.
  • Chemistry PowerPoint Lessons and Instructional Materials -  These particular resources cover atomic structure, quantum mechanics, atomic size, bonding, and several dozen additional topics. Visitors can browse through these resources at their leisure and each topic area includes a brief description of what is covered in each set of materials. Specifically, the resources include labs, assignments, worksheets, and handouts. Many of the resources draw on examples from the "Fundamentals of Chemistry" textbook…
  • ChemSpider: Award-winning database from The Royal Society of Chemistry provides fast access to over 30 million chemical structures and properties, as well as nearly unlimited links and related information. For a quick introduction, go to the About page and watch the ten-minute introductory video.
  • ChemTutor -  begins with the fundamentals and gives expert help with the most difficult phases of understanding your first course in chemistry. Chemtutor is not necessarily a complete text for your course or a complete outline, but we are proud to offer some insightful help in the parts of primary chemistry that have been, from our experience, the hardest for students to grasp.
  • ChemXSeer -  an integrated digital library and database allowing for intelligent search of documents in the chemistry domain and data obtained from chemical kinetics.
  • DVAction: Digital Video to Assist Chemistry Teachers and Instructors Online (Northwestern University). Browse the five headings on the left-hand side of the page to look through Categories, Equipment, Chemicals, and Titles. Looking over Chemicals will bring up a range of three dozen chemicals. Each item is accompanied by a short film that shows a test, interaction, or activity.
  • Dynamic Periodic Table of Elements -  This periodic table is far more feature-filled and interactive than even the most complex standalone applications.
    • Animated Periodic Table of the Elements -  A highly animated version of the periodic table of the elements. Visitors can browse through the alkali metals, the alkaline earth metals, and both the lanthanide and actinide series. As users move their mouse across the table they can learn each element’s boiling point, its oxidation states, its atomic weight, and its density. One of the other nice features of the site is that visitors can also look at each element’s bonding structure.
    • The Periodic Table of Elements (Ask.com Smart Answer) -  numerous additional resources and a drop-down menu listing each element.
    • Periodic Table of Elements. National Chemistry Week 2009: October 18–24, 2009.
    • pElement: a free interactive periodic table software application (requires download). It contains over 65 information items on each element, user selectable skins, 12 colored maps, find element tool, unit conversion tool and more!
  • Hunting the Elements (NOVA): This two-hour program "spins viewers through the world of weird, extreme chemistry: the strongest acids, the deadliest poisons, the universe's most abundant elements, and the rarest of the rare." It's a fascinating way to learn about the history of the periodic table, and the discovery and properties of the elements.
  • Intute - Interactive Chemistry Tutorials -  includes both unique problems and solution information for a wide range of subjects, including gas laws, kinetics, electrochemistry, and solubility. While the site doesn’t contain a search engine, users can scroll through each subject to look at the available resources and problem sets.
  • Laboratory Safety Videos – UC-San Diego: Designed for use in academic settings, these short and informative videos provide a wealth of information. Currently there are twelve videos on the site and they include "Flash Chromatography 101," "Basic Fume Hood Air Flow and Operation," and "How to Handle Pyrophoric Reagents." One of the more fun videos here is "The Periodic Table of Videos," which offers a brief video on each of the elements.
  • Learn Chemistry: Chemistry Resources for Teachers. The Royal Society of Chemistry has created this most useful website to help teachers and students of chemistry learn about the field via interactive experiments, diagrams, animations, and so on. The site includes over 3,300 resources.
  • Organic Chemistry Animations -  contains interactive 3D animations for some of the most important organic reactions covered during an undergraduate chemistry degree with supporting information on reactivity and spectroscopy. Visitors will want to also look at the list of reactions covered on the left-hand side of the same page.
  • Practical Chemistry: Nuffield Foundation with the Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC). Practical activities designed to "enable students to apply and extend their knowledge and understanding of chemistry in novel investigative situations." It's important to browse the Topics area, as this contains sections like States of Matter, Bonding, structure, properties, Analysis, Energy and entropy, and The Earth and atmosphere.
  • Science360 - Chemistry: Everything you hear, see, taste, smell and touch involves chemistry and chemicals. Our ability to understand the chemical make-up of things and chemical reactions has led to everything from modern food and drugs to plastics and computers.
  • Virtual Textbook of Organic Chemistry created by Professor William Reusch. An interactive textbook covering the usual topics treated in a college sophomore-level course.

       Environment and Ecology:               Index

  • Academic Earth: a user-friendly educational ecosystem that will give internet users around the world the ability to easily find, interact with, and learn from full video courses and lectures from the world’s leading scholars.
  • Academy of Natural Sciences - Exhibits include a photographic tour of Thomas Jefferson’s famed fossil collection and an overview of the work of Joseph Leidy, a noted 19th century paleontologist and anatomist. The "Scientific Research" area of the site provides copious amounts of printed literature (including reports and briefs) based on research done at the Academy.
  • All About Snow - The National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) -  The severe weather that has been taking place recently makes All About Snow the place to be. The National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) makes it possible for the snow bunny to find out the pertinent 'Snow Facts,' as well as research on the frozen realm of the cryosphere, 'the portion of the Earth's surface where water is in a solid form, usually snow or ice.'
    • NSIDC Education Center -  Earth is home to snow and ice in many different forms. These frozen realms of the cryosphere influence life all over our planet. Here in the NSIDC Education Center, you will find a range of information about Earth's snow and ice, from comprehensive "All About" sections to quick facts on popular snow and ice topics.
    • Snowflakes and Snow Crystals -  Prof. Kenneth Libbrecht at Caltech University documents the very wide, and very interesting world, of crystal growth and pattern formation in ice, of snowflakes, snow crystals, and other ice phenomena.
  • Alliant Energy Kids - Making Energy Fun and Safe: 'Through interactive and engaging activities, elementary students can learn about electricity and natural gas, how to use them safely and wisely, and the importance of conserving energy.'
  • A Rocha: Christian nature conservation organization. A Rocha projects are frequently cross-cultural in character, and share a community emphasis, with a focus on science and research, practical conservation and environmental education.
  • Au Sable Institute of Environmental Studies: the integration of knowledge of the Creation with biblical principles to bring the Christian community and the general public into a better understanding of the Creator and the stewardship of His creation.
  • Bridge Ocean Education Teacher Resource Center: "an ocean of teacher-approved marine education resources." It's the result of a great collaboration between the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the Virginia Sea Grant Marine Advisory Program. Offered on its homepage are a range of lesson plans, professional development opportunities, and an assortment of Ocean Science Topics.
  • The Catholic Climate Covenant: encourages greater personal and shared engagement by the Catholic community to live out our faith by caring for God’s creation and the "least of these" in response to the challenges of global climate change.
  • The Climate Literacy & Energy Awareness Network (CLEAN) offers a fine range of educational materials for educators hoping to build their students' "understanding of the core ideas in climate and energy science."
  • The Digital Library for Earth System Education (DLESE) -  effort involving educators, students, and scientists working together to improve the quality, quantity, and efficiency of teaching and learning about the Earth system at all levels. DLESE resources include electronic materials for both teachers and learners, such as lesson plans, maps, images, data sets, visualizations, assessment activities, curriculum, online courses, and much more. Click on Educational Resources and Educators Overview.
  • The Dynamic Earth -  the Smithsonian Museum of Natural History brings alive the fascinating history of the Earth from the perspective of the physical sciences. After a dramatic introduction, visitors can explore the Earth's history in four sections: "Gems and Minerals", "Rocks and Mining", "Plate Tectonics and Volcanoes", and "The Solar System".
  • Earth Day Network -  founded on the premise that all people…have a moral right to a healthy, sustainable environment. Our mission is to broaden and diversify the environmental movement worldwide, and to mobilize it as the most effective vehicle for promoting a healthy, sustainable environment.
  • Earthwatch Institute: scientific field research and education to promote the understanding and action necessary for a sustainable environment.
    • Earthwatch-Education: curriculum ideas and lesson plans inspired by other educators' experiences on Earthwatch expeditions. These resources are free and available for you to use.
  • EnergyStar.gov: a joint program of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Department of Energy helping us all save money and protect the environment through energy efficient products and practices.
  • The Environmental Health Science Education is an education outreach of the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences provides educators, students and scientists with easy access to reliable tools, resources and classroom materials. It seeks to invest in the future of environmental health science by increasing awareness of the link between the environment and human health.
  • Explorations – e-magazine of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography based at the University of California at San Diego. Explorations was created to educate the public about their projects and research. Visitors will find a trove of multimedia features, magazine articles, and information about conservation activities designed to protect the world's oceans for future generations.
  • Geomagnetism: The National Geophysical Data Center maintains archives of geomagnetic data to further the understanding of Earth magnetism and the Sun-Earth environment. Data at NGDC include surface, ocean, airborne and satellite measurements, as well as models of the main field and its secular change, and models of the Space - Earth environment.
  • Geopgraphy4Kids -  introduction to the earth sciences that includes topics on the Earth's structure, atmosphere, hydrosphere, and biosphere.
  • GoodCleanTech -  The Independent Guide to Ecotechnology. Aims to provide you with news, tips, advice, and ideas about how to do more with less.
  • The Habitable Planet: A Systems Approach to Environmental Science (Annenberg Learner). Course components include 13 half-hour video programs, a coordinated Web site which includes the streamed video programs, the course text online, five interactive simulations, background on the scientists who created the content and those whose research is documented, a professional development guide…
  • "Healing a Broken World" – Jesuits Special Report on Ecology. "…to create a new world based on a just relationship with creation."
  • How to Compost -  designed to be a hub for all composting information. No matter what your interest is, you'll find something here worth you time. Our goal is to be the best resource on the internet covering all topics about composting and organic gardening.
  • Kids do Ecology -  presented in both English and Spanish. Features an introduction to the scientific method, a learning lab, pages on Marine Mammals, a section on World Biomes and Conservation Projects.
  • MarineBio: Global mission is to share the wonders of the ocean to inspire conservation, education, research and a sea ethic.
  • Mother Nature Network -  Environmental news and information that makes sense.
  • MyHurricane: Hurricane And Storm Tracking Online. Did the news just report a hurricane or storm around your area? MyHurricane is a great hurricane and storm tracking web tool that is free to use.
  • National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences: Lesson Resources for Teachers. There are booklets, fact sheets, websites, and flyers all arranged into neat and tidy sections. The Booklets area includes "You and Your Genes-Making it in a Tough Environment" and "Guide to Keeping Laboratory Notebooks." The Fact Sheets section includes overviews of endocrine disruptors, allergens, and environmental factors and breast cancer risk.
  • Nature – Beauty – Gratitude by Louie Schwartzberg (TEDTalks). His stunning time-lapse photography, accompanied by powerful words from Benedictine monk David Steindl-Rast, serves as a meditation on being grateful for every day.
    • Wings of Life: Louie Schwartzberg presents the unsung heroes of the global food chain. You will witness, as never before, fantastic journeys that are full of wonder, drama and beauty.…Visually stunning and emotional, the story is told from the flower's point of view. For the first time ever, you will witness a world hidden from the naked eye-and it will be an experience you will never forget.
  • Nature & Science - Teacher Resources (National Park Service) -  Exemplary set of educational resources which draws on their greatest assets, namely national parks from Maine to Utah. The main area on their homepage features over a dozen teacher guides and park programs that feature detailed geology lessons that draw on the landscapes of Yosemite National Park and the dynamic volcanoes of Hawaii.
  • NatureServe Explorer - An Online Encyclopedia of Life: an authoritative source for information on more than 70,000 plants, animals, and ecosystems of the United States and Canada. Explorer includes particularly in-depth coverage for rare and endangered species.
  • NOAA Discovery Kits -  presents tutorials, lessons, and multimedia activities for learning about corals, estuaries, ocean currents, tides, and pollution from diffuse sources. Learn about the waters and habitats where rivers meet the sea and form some of the world’s most productive ecosystems; and geodesy, the science of measuring and monitoring the shape of the earth and the location of points on its surface.
  • Our Endangered Planet - Americas: Newsweek photo essays on how climate changes can affect the planet. Also section on Africa | Arctic | Asia | Europe.
  • The Paleobiology Database -  to provide global, collection-based occurrence and taxonomic data for marine and terrestrial animals and plants of any geological age, as well as web-based software for statistical analysis of the data. The project’s wider, long-term goal is to encourage collaborative efforts to answer large-scale paleobiological questions by developing a useful database infrastructure and bringing together large data sets.
  • Principles of Catholic Environmentalism - Jeff Mirus (CatholicCulture.org)
  • Real Climate -  Climate Science from Climate Scientists. Features: Weather and climate basics | The basics of climate prediction | Global Warming basics, and more.
  • Renewable Energy Policy Project -  The Renewable Energy Policy Project (REPP) has spent the past decade educating the general public about renewable energies. This is accomplished by providing competent and rigorous policy analysis about the myriad of issues surrounding the viability and sustainability of such energy sources.
  • Rocks for Kids -  Here you will find out stuff about rocks & minerals and where to go to find out more. If you already collect rocks then this is the place for you! Find out where you can get more rocks, look at some super pictures of rocks, learn how to identify the rocks you already have and discover neat things you can do with rocks.
  • Scripps Institution of Oceanography: one of the oldest, largest, and most important centers for ocean and earth science research, education, and public service in the world.
  • Storm Instability - Mike Hollingshead. Follow Mike on his first chase beginning in 1999 as well as access his 'Images by Year,' the earliest being taken in 1996 prior to Mike's beginning his actual 'chasing' pastime that has evolved into a career. The Storm Glossary/Info section will help you understand supercell storm structure, the various cloud formations and lightening associated with tornados.
  • Students for the Environment - US Environmental Protection Agency. Consists of three primary sections: Students K-12, Educators and Parents, and News and Deadlines; and Homework Resources.
  • Teaching Issues and Experiments in Ecology (TIEE): A peer-reviewed web-based collection of ecological educational materials. TIEE is a resource for busy ecology faculty who are looking for new ways to reach their students, or who perhaps want to learn more about teaching and learning.
  • U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) provides reliable scientific information to describe and understand the Earth; minimize loss of life and property from natural disasters; manage water, biological, energy, and mineral resources.
  • Weather Education - The National Weather Service's Office of Climate, Water, and Weather Services: Offers a range of materials for educators and students which includes lesson plans, brochures, satellite image collections and career information for the fields of meteorology and climatology. Includes eight topical sections, including "Classroom Materials", "Careers in Weather", and "Graphics, Photos, Images".
    • The National Weather Service: a component of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), an Operating Unit of the U.S. Department of Commerce. Provides weather, water, and climate data, forecasts and warnings for the protection of life and property and enhancement of the national economy. Customize your local forecast in the left column.
    • UM Weather (Univ. of Michigan - Dept. of Atmospheric, Oceanic, & Space Sciences): the Internet's premier source of up-to-date weather information, and the Net's largest collection of weather links. Note a search engine window on the right side called "Fast Forecast." Type in the ZIP Code, or name of location and click "Get it."
  • Windows to the Universe: Myths, Stories and Art (National Earth Science Teachers Association). An exploration of all matters in "Earth and Space sciences and the historical and cultural ties between science, exploration, and the human experience. " The Culture section of the site is quite a find and allows visitors to browse the collection of myths, folk tales, and stories about the Earth and sky.

Physics:               Index

  • The Physics Professor's Ultimate Resources: Includes sections on Geometry/Trigonometry | Chaos & Fractal | Mechanics | Optics | Tools | Virtual Labs | Miscellaneous Physics Sites.
    • The Feynman Lectures on Physics: now available in their entirety online and for free. "First presented in the early 1960s at Caltech by the Nobel Prize-winning physicist Richard Feynman, the lectures were eventually turned into a book by Feynman, Robert B. Leighton, and Matthew Sands.
    • The Office for Mathematics, Science, and Technology Education (College of Education at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign): To serve as a model-builder for innovative, standards-based, technology-intensive mathematics and science instruction at the K-16 levels. Online Resource Catalog – Mathematics: Number & Operations, Algebra, Geometry, Measurement, Data Analysis and Probability, Problem Solving, Reasoning and Proof. Science: Biology, Chemistry, Periodic Table, Significant Figures & Measurement, Lab Reports, Titrations, Physics.
    • Physics for the 21st Century: a wonderful new resource for physics teachers, students, and anyone else who would care to learn more about dark matter, string theory, and other "big topics in modern physics". Produced by the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics Science Media Group in association with the Harvard University Department of Physics.
    • Physics4Kids -  information on motion, heat and thermodynamics, electricity & magnetism, light, and modern physics topics.

Teaching Resources and Professional Development:               Index

  • 100 Ways Google Can Make You a Better Educator (Online Education Database - OEDB)
  • 20 Thing Educators Need to Know About How Students Learn.
  • A to Z Teacher Stuff For Teachers: FREE online lesson plans, lesson plan ideas and activities, thematic units, printables, themes, teaching tips, articles, and educational resources.
  • Baudville.com: The place for daily recognition. Recognition gifts, resources, e-Praises and custom awards.
  • The Career Toolbox: The Guide for Educators. Education careers require extensive training, some certifications, and boundless creativity – especially now that technology grows more and more important in the 21st century classroom. Check programs for Blackboard certification; National Board for Professional Teaching Standards; The New York Institute of Technology’s 15-credit certification focusing on 21st century teaching skills; Google Teacher Academy, and more.
  • The Center for Academic Integrity -  a forum to identify, affirm, and promote the values of academic integrity among students, faculty, teachers and administrators. Educational Resources include Academic Integrity Assessment Guide, Academic Integrity Articles, Ethics Tutorials, Faculty Workshops and Model Code of Academic Integrity.
  • DiscoverySchool.com -  Provides innovative teaching materials for teachers, useful and enjoyable resources for students, and smart advice for parents about how to help their kids enjoy learning and excel in school.
  • Doing What Works (US Dept. of Ed.): dedicated to assisting teachers in the implementation of effective educational practices. Contains practice guides developed by the Department’s Institute of Education Sciences that evaluate research on the effectiveness of teaching practices described in the guides. Also contains examples of possible ways this research may be used, but not necessarily the only ways to implement these teaching practices.
  • EducationCorner®: a comprehensive Internet guide to the best education sites, resources and articles on the Web. All education topics and resources are sorted by subject and lifestage, so you can find precisely what you're looking for quickly…
  • Education World -  the Educator's Best Friend, a resource that includes a search engine for educational Web sites only, lesson plans, information on how to integrate technology in the classroom.
  • Educational Sources Online For Middle School and Up (Online Schools.org): Includes art/music, literature/writing, history/geography, mathematics, reference sources, sciences, teacher resources and technology.
  • ERIC - the Education Resources Information Center -  An internet-based digital library of education research and information sponsored by the Institute of Education Sciences (IES) of the U.S. Department of Education. ERIC provides access to bibliographic records of journal and non-journal literature indexed from 1966 to the present.
  • Essential Resources for Your Classroom (Scholastic.com)
  • Federal Resources for Educational Excellence (FREE): Teaching and learning resources from federal agencies. Includes Arts & Music, Language Arts, U.S. History topics, Math, Science.
  • Getting Results -  this self-contained professional development course is designed to "challenge previous thinking about teaching and learning and give you the basic tools for effective classroom practices." Enhanced with online videos and worksheets, the course contains six modules, including "Moving Beyond the Classroom" and "Teaching with Technology".
  • Kathy Schrock's Guide for Educators (DiscoverySchool.com): a categorized list of sites useful for enhancing curriculum and professional growth. It is updated often to include the best sites for teaching and learning.
  • Learning Study Guides & Teacher Resources (Shmoop.com): offers learning study guides and e-books covering Teachers & Librarians Resources.
  • Learning Network - Grades 3-12 (NY Times): Connections for Students, Teachers and Parents.
  • Lesson Plan Directory - Lesson Corner.com: Includes lesson plans and worksheets covering Art & Music | English & Writing | Foreign Languages | Geography | Health & Sports & Fitness | History | Math & Geometry | References - Study Skills - Internet Research - Library Skills | Science & Astronomy | Social Studies
  • Lesson Planning Articles (LessonPlanet): Timely and inspiring curriculum planning and teaching ideas and strategies that you can apply in your own classroom. These articles are written by experienced Pre-K-12 teachers and provide you with useful links to lesson plans that have been reviewed by our teacher team.
  • LD OnLine.org: the world's leading website on learning disabilities and ADHD. LD OnLine seeks to help children and adults reach their full potential by providing accurate and up-to-date information and advice about learning disabilities and ADHD.
  • Library of Congress (LOC) – Teachers -  More than 10 million primary sources online. Kids and Families
  • National ACademic ADvising Association -  Resources helpful in advising students.
  • Online Stopwatch - Countdown Timer: a simple full-screen online stopwatch and countdown timer.
  • PBS Teachers -  Free multimedia resources and professional development for pre-K–12 educators. Standards-based resources: The Arts | Math | Health & Fitness | Reading & Language Arts | Science & Tech | Social Studies | Early Childhood Educators | Library Media & Tech Coordinators.
    • PBS TeacherLine: committed to helping PreK-12 teachers acquire the skills needed to prepare students through more than 90 courses in mathematics, reading, instructional technology, instructional strategies, science, and curriculum mapping.
  • Scholastic Teachers - Where Teachers Come First. Teaching Resources, Children's Book Recommendations, Student Activities.
  • ScienceNOW - Explore Teacher's Guides (NOVA): Designed by NOVA's scienceNOW group. Offers a wide range of teacher's guides designed to be used in conjunction with the scienceNOW programs. The guides are divided into thirteen topical areas: Anthropology/Archeology | Chemistry | Earth Science | Forensics | Health Science | Life Science | Mathematics | Oceanography | Paleontology | Physics | Social Studies | Space Science | Technology/Engineering.
  • The Smithsonian Institution for Educators: field trips, professional development, lesson plans, resource library.
  • Support for Students Exposed to Trauma (RAND Corp.): 200-page manual that offers an overview of the "Support for Students Exposed to Trauma" (SSET) program. which is "a series of ten lessons whose structured approach aims to reduce distress resulting from exposure to trauma."
  • Teach For America is the national corps of outstanding recent college graduates of all academic majors who commit two years to teach in urban and rural public schools and become lifelong leaders in ensuring educational equity and excellence for all children. Our mission is to build the movement to eliminate educational inequity by enlisting our nation's most promising future leaders in the effort.
  • The Teacher's Corner: Teacher resources, lesson plans, thematic units, printable worksheets
  • Teachers' Domain: Digital Media for the Classroom & Professional Development (PBS & National Science Foundation). A free digital media service for educational use from public broadcasting and its partners with 1000s of media resources, support materials, and tools for classroom lessons, individualized learning programs, and teacher professional learning communities. These classroom resources, featuring media from NOVA, Frontline, Design Squad, American Experience, and other public broadcasting and content partners are easy to use and correlate to state and national standards.
  • TeachersFirst -  web resource for K-12 classroom teachers who want useful resources and lesson plans to use with their students.
  • Teacher-to-Teacher Initiative: E-learning Workshops is a U.S. Dept. of Education FREE professional development website for teachers and administrators of proven classroom strategies and provide more effective ways of using data to improve instruction in the nation's schools.
  • The Teachers Network is a site 'by teachers, for teachers.' Its mission is 'to empower, recognize, and connect teachers to improve student learning, and to advocate for teacher leadership, all for the public good.' You'll find lesson plans, essays by those in the work force on their teaching experiences and also a list of grants available to educators. This site is also valuable as a resource for anyone interested in teaching instruction, as well as a good resource for home schooling.
  • Teacher Resources by Annenberg Media: distribution of educational video programs with coordinated Web and print materials for the professional development of K-12 teachers.
  • Teachers Resources (LOC): Bringing the power of primary sources into the classroom.
  • Teaching Channel: Inspired Teachers, Inspiring Classrooms. Committed to showcasing effective and inspiring teaching practices in public schools across America. Topics covered are Math, Science, English Language Arts, History/Social Science.
  • Teach With Movies: Great resource for those looking to integrate moving pictures into their classroom environments. On this website, visitors will find Snippets & Shorts, Sciences, Movie Worksheets, and a substantial variety of other areas. The Snippets & Shorts area is a particular gem, as it offers suggestions for using a range of popular films to teach concepts in science, history, English, and other subjects.
  • TryScience Teachers -  a wealth of resources to help you integrate TryScience and science center resources into your classroom activities, connect with your parents and students, and more!
  • UNESCO Portal on Higher Education Institutions -  Access to authoritative and up-to-date on-line information on higher education institutions recognized or otherwise sanctioned by competent authorities in participating countries.
  • Wingclips – Movie clips that illustrate and inspire: Now you can view inspirational movie clips from many of your favorite films. These WingClips™ can also be downloaded to use in your school, church or other organization. Search by Movie Title, Scripture, Category, of Theme.
  • Worksheet Library -  home to over 5,000 printable K-6 worksheets for teachers, parents, and homeschoolers. Includes a great selection of Best Teacher Sites.

Technology and Tutorials:               Index

  • 7 Computer Security Tips for Students - Preparing for school used to mean filling a backpack with spiral notebooks and textbooks. Today, computers are often at the top of that list. Read these tips to help protect school computers from viruses, hackers, spyware, and other attacks.
  • Ace Free Fonts - free fonts for Windows and Mac. One of the largest archives on the web including free fonts for Windows and Mac! There are 20309 fonts for Windows and Mac with customizable previews and full character maps.
  • AppDucate: Tutorials and reviews dedicated to Macs, iOS devices and the software that goes with it. Provides honest reviews, helpful tutorials and fixes for common Apple related issues.
  • BASIC-256 -  BASIC designed to teach young children the basics of computer programming. It uses traditional control structures like gosub, for/next, and goto, which helps kids easily see how program flow-control works. It has a built-in graphics mode which lets them draw pictures on screen in minutes, and a set of detailed, easy-to-follow tutorials that introduce programming concepts through fun exercises.
  • Beginner’s Guide to Search Engine Optimization -  This guide provides a complete overview of many of the processes, techniques and strategies used by professional search engine optimization specialists.
  • Campus Technology -  tracking changes in the ways technology is harnessed on college campuses. Visitors can read through sections that address current news items related to campus technology, take a look at their latest newsletter, and read articles from the print edition. One section that is particularly useful for those in the world of information technology is the "Resources" area that includes "White Papers" on timely topics.
  • The Continuing Challenges of Technology Integration for Teachers
  • Converge Magazine: Technology in Education. Converge is a great name for this fantastic online magazine about the convergence of education and technology. As the media arm of the Center for Digital Education, Converge is composed of "quarterly themed Converge Special Reports [and] Converge online. [It] provides strategy and leadership for technology use in the K-12 and higher education market."
  • DigitalLiteracy.gov: your destination for digital literacy resources and collaboration. Created by the National Telecommunications and Information Administration, an arm of the Commerce Department to give schools, libraries and job training centers the tools to help teach computer and Internet skills to Americans who are new to the Net. The site offers links to everything from basic Web surfing tips and online banking tutorials to resume-building services and resources on combating cyberbullying. It is to ensure that all Americans have access to high-speed Internet connections and the skills needed to use them to compete in today's digital economy.
  • Educational CyberPlayGround -  provides K-12 interdisciplinary, multicultural collaborative online thematic curriculum modules for schools, home schooled, and learning centers. The main focus of the site is to improve reading and "help all children,…teachers, and regular folks to learn to use and feel comfortable with technology."
  • Education World, the Educators Best Friend: distributor of free educational web-based materials focused on grades K-12. You'll find articles on Lesson Planning, Technology Integration, School Issues, Professional Development, Administrator's Desk and EdWorld At Home.
  • Edumax -  free "virtual classrooms" on various subjects and you can learn for free as long as you have access to the internet! Learn Microsoft Office, Learn Programming, Learn Computer Basics, Learn Database Basics, Learn Web Development, Learn Internet Business.
  • eLearn Magazine -  Education and Technology in Perspective
  • The EnhancED (Columbia Center for New Media Teaching and Learning - CCNMTL): Provides faculty and instructors information about new technologies and hot topics surrounding education and technology, and to share expertise about these technologies and approaches to teaching with technology.
  • Facebook Beginners Guide 101 - StateStats. This guide will help you get started with setting up an account, finding friends, uploading photos, changing, privacy settings, and more.
    • Facebook: The (Very) Unofficial Privacy Guide (MakeUseOf.com). This amazing guide outlines a variety of things regarding Facebook privacy, starting from how to make sure a comment meant for your friends isn't seen by co-workers to keeping your Facebook information off Google's search results and blocking unwanted users. Plus a few things you probably didn't even know you wanted to know.
  • Google Code University: learn more about current computing technologies and paradigms. The Courses section contains tutorials, lecture slides, and problem sets for a variety of topic areas: AJAX Programming, Algorithms, Distributed Systems, Web Security, Languages.
  • Google Web Search - Classroom Lessons and Resources. These Search Education lessons were developed by Google Certified Teachers to help educators learn better search skills in their classroom. The lessons are short, modular and not specific to any discipline so you can mix and match to what best fits the needs of your classroom. Additionally, all lessons come with a companion set of slides (and some with additional resources) to help you guide your in-class discussions.
    • Google Help - Cheat Sheet. Here's a quick list of some of our most popular tools to help refine and improve your search. For additional help with Google Web Search or any other Google product, you can visit our main Google Help page.
    • Google Tips and Tricks Every Student Should Know (Lifehacker.com): Many of these tips you've no doubt learned before from our previous Google coverage, but every worthwhile subject is worth reviewing now and again, and today we're looking specifically at the best Google tricks for students.
  • Guidebook To Web Searching (MakeUseOf.com). How to formulate your search queries, instead just 'asking' questions to the mighty Google, and how many different content-specific search engines there are at your disposal.
  • Handbook of Emerging Technologies for Learning (HETL) -  a resource for educators planning to incorporate technologies in their teaching and learning activities. A PDF version of the Handbook is also available for download.
  • How To Download A YouTube Video To Windows Media Player (MakeUseOf.com). This article is mainly concerned with how to view YouTube videos in Windows Media Player, regardless of how you obtained the files and what file format they are in. Hence, we can neglect the third option.
  • The Internet Crime Complaint Center (IC3) -  a partnership between the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), the National White Collar Crime Center (NW3C), and the Bureau of Justice Assistance (BJA). IC3's mission is to serve as a vehicle to receive, develop, and refer criminal complaints regarding the rapidly expanding arena of cyber crime. The IC3 gives the victims of cyber crime a convenient and easy-to-use reporting mechanism that alerts authorities of suspected criminal or civil violations.
  • Instructional Technology Resources for Schools (Online Schools.org): Technology Standards, Planning and Implementation; Internet Technology and Research Tools.
  • KeepVid: Download and save any video from Youtube, Dailymotion, Metacafe, iFilm and more!
  • McAfee Avert Stinger: stand-alone utility used to detect and remove specific viruses. It is not a substitute for full anti-virus protection, but rather a tool to assist administrators and users when dealing with an infected system.
  • Microsoft Office 2010: Ultimate Tips & Tricks (MakeUseOf.com). Points out all the best new features of Microsoft’s latest office suite, and explains them all in one handy guide. Office 2010 is so expansive that even veteran users will often find that they aren’t expert in even half of the capabilities the software offers.
    • Learn Excel (Chandoo.org): tips for mastering Microsoft Excel.
  • Microsoft Word Training Modules -  These training modules address such topics as inserting images in MS Word, creating signs with MS Word, and keyboard shortcuts. Each of the modules is written with introductory users in mind, and they include helpful graphics that illustrate different actions and tools. Additionally, the site also includes a series of "Beyond the Basics" learning modules that provide guidance on how to use the mail merge function and how to create hyperlinks within MS Word.
    • Getting Started With Excel -  This tutorial is part of the StudyFinance.com of the University of Arizona. It is divided into eight sections, which include "Entering and Editing Data", "Formatting the Worksheet", and "Creating a Chart". Each section contains several short paragraphs of text, complemented effectively with a few helpful graphics. The tutorial is rounded out by several problem assignments that will make sure students have mastered some of the basic features of Excel.
    • Microsoft Excel shortcuts: A handy infographic on the most important Microsoft Excel shortcuts.
    • MS Excel Tips by Allen Wyatt (Tips.Net): a powerful program, and you can make it even more powerful by learning the Excel tips, Excel tricks, and Excel tutorials that help make you an Excel guru.
    • MS Excel 2007 (Tips.Net): No doubt about it; Excel is "different" now, and it can be confusing to beginners and frustrating to long-time users. These tips are designed for use specifically and solely with Excel 2007. You'll find just about everything you need to become productive with the program right away.
    • MS Word Tips by Allen Wyatt (Tips.net): for many different versions of Microsoft Word for the PC: Word 6, Word 95, Word 97, Word 2000, Word 2002, Word 2003, and Word 2007. Tips cover editing, footnotes/endnotes, headers/footers, bullets/numbering, find/replace, graphics, outline, tables, columns, templates, and more.
    • MS Word 2007 (Tips.Net): You'll find just about everything you need to become productive with Word 2007 right away. Tips cover editing, files, formatting, graphics, macros, multimedia, and more.
    • Microsoft Office Templates for Word, Excel, PowerPoint and Access. There are also templates for other Office programs. You'll find free templates for budgets, résumés, cards and much more.
    • Microsoft PowerPoint Templates
      • Free PowerPoint® Templates for Your Presentations: 12 unique and 100% free templates that you can download, unzip and revise to create a great presentation. There is no hidden cost. Each template is free and has several slides included that are ready to use.
  • North Carolina Tests of Computer Skills Student Handbook. For students who entered grade 8 from 2000–2001 school year and beyond.
  • Online/Internet Safety Guide -  kids, teens & families. What kinds of risks are there? Risks by technology and privacy information.
  • Online Safety - Yahoo: Making smart choice online. Online safety skills for Teens, and for Parents.
  • Parry Aftab, Esq., The Privacy Lawyer™: Managing cybercrime, privacy and cyber-abuse risks. Check out resource sections on Best Practices, CyberLaw, Internet Safety, Cyberbulling, and more.
  • SeniorNet -  Our mission is to provide older adults education for and access to computer technologies to enhance their lives and enable them to share their knowledge and wisdom.
  • PowerPoint, How to Use  (About.com) -  Beginner’s Guide to PowerPoint, Free PowerPoint Tutorials, YouTube videos, Technology in the classroom.
  • SweetSearch: a custom search engine designed for students. Searches only 35,000 Web sites that have been evaluated and approved by a staff of Internet research experts at Dulcinea Media, and its librarian and teacher consultants.
  • Sumatra PDF: free, open-source PDF viewer for Windows. Sumatra has a minimalistic design. Simplicity has a higher priority than a lot of features. It's small and starts up very fast. It's designed for portable use: only one file so you can run it from external USB drive. Doesn't write to registry. Download Sumatra PDF
  • Teaching Kids to Stay Cyber-Safe (National Cyber Security Alliance): A national campaign to engrain the three Cs—cyberethics, cybersafety and cybersecurity—into the subconscious of K-12 students.
  • Technology Assisting Literacy Knowledge (TALK) -  The Classroom Literacy Guide is a rollup of best practices in literacy, consistent for all grade levels, that is put into a form useful for instructional planning, self-evaluation, peer-mentorship and staff development. It is the "how to" for a good literacy-based program.
  • Teachnet.Com -  offers multiple resources for teachers, including lesson plan ideas in mathematics, science, technology and many other subject areas.
  • TED-Ed: harnesses the talent of the world's best teachers and visualizers, extending great lessons beyond a single classroom to anyone with internet access."
    • TED-Ed (YouTube): Offers up original video content that marries the talent of great teachers with top animators to bring concepts like neuroscience to life in short videos, typically 5 minutes long.
  • TeenChatDecoder: Do you often wonder what those acronyms are that your teenager is typing when they go online to chat? Are you always worried about the things your kid is doing online? If you have answered yes to these questions, then Teen Chat Decoder is the right site for you.
  • TimerCountdown: Online Countdown Timer. Create a custom timer – Simply enter the units and unit name separated by a dash.
  • Using the Technology of Today, In the Classroom Today
  • W3Schools - Internet Developers Portal. Full web building tools - FREE. Covers HTML Tutorials | Browser Scripting | XML Tutorials | Server Scripting | Multimedia | Web Building, and more. W3Schools will help you become a professional Web developer.
  • Web Site Accessibility - Section 3: Section 508, ADA, and Web Sites. Section 508 and the ADA (Americans with Disabilities Act) establish U.S. requirements for Web accessibility. The annotated resources below provide links to official documentation and articles and tutorials about how to follow these guidelines and regulations.
  • Wolfram Education Portal: dedicated to the advancement of science and mathematics education. For both students and educators, this educational portal contains a collection of resources spanning all pre-college grade levels, including dynamic classroom Demonstrations.
  • WordWeb: comprehensive one-click English thesaurus and dictionary for Windows. It can be used to look up words from almost any program, showing definitions, synonyms and related words. It includes pronunciations and usage examples, and has helpful spelling and sounds-like links.
  • Yahoo! Safely! - Safety Tips: Check out these tips and advice on how to protect yourself online. Includes: Mobile Safety Tips | Tips for Strong, Secure Passwords | Tips to Help Prevent Cyberbullying | Protecting Your Privacy Online, and more.

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